x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

Mating Material vs. Timeouts

  • #21

    What is that last post???

  • #22
    EndgameStudy wrote (#11):

    ... The white king alone can theorectically stalemate ALL of the black pieces in this position:

    This is actually a perfect example of why stalemate HAS to be a draw (some guy complaining on forum that stalemate should be a win).

    Personally, I think if White has managed to force that position with just his king he deserves a win.

  • #23
    EndgameStudy wrote:

    I think in any position, where mate is theoretically possible, the computer should be able to detect if a player could reasonably FORCE mate in any given position, without the opponent's cooperation

    Computers can't do that yet.

    There are problems posted in the endgame forum which current computer programs will fail to solve. The starting position is also a theoretical win for one side or a theoretical draw but not as yet solvable by computer.  

  • #24
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #25
    MARattigan wrote:
    EndgameStudy wrote:

     

    ...  If both sides can theoretically force mate, then whoever runs out of time should just lose.

    It is never the case that both sides can theoretically force mate.

  • #26

    The FIDE rules seem to me to be perfectly sensible on this point. 

    The chess.com rules are apparently a local variant used in the USA and published by the USCF.  You will need fork out $20 to acquire these as far as I can see. Does chess.com make a copy available online anywhere?

     

    The reason I ask is related to positions like the following:

    What happens if Black on the move shown removes the White bishop from the board, releases his king on h8 and then hums "Colonol Bogey" until his flag falls?

    Under FIDE rules I think White may play Ng6# or hum in harmony until Black's flag falls. In either case he wins.

    I think under USCF rules White is not allowed to play if his clock is not running and I'm told the position resulting from Black's move would be a draw in case of timeout. Does this mean the course of action described would be Black's most accurate defence under USCF rules?

  • #27
    EndgameStudy wrote (#21):

    What is that last post???

    It goes: dah-daaaaah, dah-daaaaaah. dah dah-dah-da-dah-dah dahh-dah-da-daaaaah...

  • #28
    aravinds_ll wrote:

    I think, in the first three positions, according to FIDE rules, Black wins. But on Chess.com (which follows USCF rules), the game is a draw.

     

    In the 4th position, it's obviously White winning...

    Under FIDE laws, whoever runs out of time loses in all the positions.

     

    I find it hard to believe that under USCF rules (or on chess.com) Black would draw if he ran out of time in example 3, but I don't know where I can find a free version of either set of rules.

  • #29
    MARattigan wrote:

    The FIDE rules seem to me to be perfectly sensible on this point. 

    The chess.com rules are apparently a local variant used in the USA and published by the USCF.  You will need fork out $20 to acquire these as far as I can see. Does chess.com make a copy available online anywhere?

     

    The reason I ask is related to positions like the following:

     

    What happens if Black on the move shown removes the White bishop from the board, releases his king on h8 and then hums "Colonol Bogey" until his flag falls?

    Under FIDE rules I think White may play Ng6# or hum in harmony until Black's flag falls. In either case he wins.

    I think under USCF rules White is not allowed to play if his clock is not running and I'm told the position resulting from Black's move would be a draw in case of timeout. Does this mean the course of action described would be Black's most accurate defence under USCF rules?

     

    Quite a logical question to ponder about.

  • #30

    What happends if white loses on time if the only legal move available is pawn promotion which will be stalemate.

     

    Assuming wKing is stalemated, the only legal move for for black is pawn promotion which end in stalemate. 

     

    White's time runs out before black can make the final move, which will be draw. 

     

    What do FIDE rules say about this scenario?

  • #31

    What about just a simple position like this:

     

    White has mating material, but will clearly lose, white wins if black flags

    BUT:

    In this position white has mating material, but will CLEARLY WIN. There are no good parameters to set for this. You would need an AI program to determine who should win/lose/draw on time.

Top

Online Now