Forums

After studying for a year, I am stuck at 800 ELO.

Sort:
sittingraccoondog1103

(1) I read two books for beginners. With a chess board ready.

(2) I solved over 5000 puzzles in total, including when I was using my previous account.
I was spending at least 30 seconds per problem.

(3) Including the time I was using my previous account, I played 15+10 rapid games over 2000 times in total.
Of course, I reviewed each game and thought about the causes of mistakes and countermeasures.

(4) During a game, I always check before moving.
Checks, captures, threats, etc. Including if I or my opponent are leaving any pieces dangling.
I spend 20-30 seconds on each move.

To be honest, I have been studying chess diligently for about a year.
People here often try to lecture newbies like me about not trying hard enough, but that's disrespectful.

I have tried my best to follow the advice of many people, but
Still, I'm stuck at triple-digit ELO.

Now, what should I try harder than this?
Will I continue to make unrewarding efforts?
Or will I accept that chess is not for me and give up on improving? Or leave?

EborKnight

Please don't stop playing, especially if you enjoy the game. Who cares what you're rating is? Why does it matter?? I'm an 800 player and quite content. It does surprise me how talented sub-1000 players can be.

sittingraccoondog1103
EborKnight はこう書きました:

Please don't stop playing, especially if you enjoy the game. Who cares what you're rating is? Why does it matter?? I'm an 800 player and quite content. It does surprise me how talented sub-1000 players can be.

(1)cuz it seems stupid that I can't reach to 1000. shameful

(2)not fun cuz i can't improve as much as I expected

sittingraccoondog1103

Why aren't you interested in improving?
Aren't we all on this site because we want to get better?

DreamscapeHorizons

Play mostly slower games. Do 5 tactics each day without a clock, it's more important to get it right. Go through a book on strategy. Really study it with a chessboard & real pieces. If it's really good go through it twice. Learn basic endings really well, king & pawns, rook & pawns, etc. Don't try to memorize openings, just learn the opening principles such as try to control the center, get ur pieces out fast, etc. And just as important, start playing in real live tournaments even if u think ur not ready. Ur ready now even if u don't think so. That'll improve u. Ur gonna have real serious games to go over/study & learn from.

Gimfain

Looking at a few of your games it feels like you put out your pieces in the opening and then you are in the middle game and have no idea what to do. Since you don't know what to do, you often end up making moves that weakens your position and you never reach a position where you can actually use tactics.

The way forward would be to learn an actual opening with both white and black that creates a more offensive position instead of the very passive four knights italian that I saw you playing with white. Learn the first five moves and every time you don't know what to do next, look it up in the database afterward on what could have been a better move.

That way you will slowly learn more and end up learning 8-10 first moves and get a far better position than your opponent which leads to tactical opportunities.

vladimir_ivanov07

Man, I am honestly surprised that we pretty much did the same thing - solve puzzles (though not 5000 of them), look for checks, captures, and attacks, etc etc. I, too, was once stuck at 700-800 elo for a month after my interest in chess was revived. When I finally managed to break through however, my rating skyrocketed and I didn't even stay in the 900-1100 range for a week. I was even very surprised about how instantaneous it happened.

Based on your list, you seem pretty grindy on the tactics aspect of the game. So my take is this: you probably have a problem related to the opening and/or endgame aspect of the game. Looking into your game list, you have multiple games wherein the game is decided in opening, and this might mean that your principles and opening theory are not strengthened. I also suggest to not try giuco-piano-esque solid openings and instead learn theory and tricks for specific openings like the ruy lopez, italian, and scotch since you are a 1. e4 player. Additionally, you seem to resign early in the game, which is just not something you should do at a triple digit rating. Heck, even at my level I blundered my rook but then my opponent shortly blundered his king!

To summarize, basically, despite your best efforts there is still some aspect that you have not trained for, which is why your hardwork has not been reiterated as victories on the chessboard. I believe that there is no such thing as "I don't have the chess talent to further progress in the game" and, thus, anyone can progress at the game whatever your chess goals are: be a titled player, become the champ of your local tournament, or even just reach 2000 elo.

JGambit
sittingraccoondog1103 wrote:

3) . . .Of course, I reviewed each game and thought about the causes of mistakes and countermeasures.

(4) During a game, I always check before moving.
Checks, captures, threats, etc. Including if I or my opponent are leaving any pieces dangling.
I spend 20-30 seconds on each move.

I'm stuck at triple-digit ELO.

Now, what should I try harder than this?
Will I continue to make unrewarding efforts?
Or will I accept that chess is not for me and give up on improving? Or leave?

Very hard to believe points 3 and 4 and being stuck at 800, I think I should look at some of your games for insight. There isn't a situation where I could see someone actually doing that and not being 1400 on here or at least 1200. Chess is for anyone who enjoys playing it so you get to decide to play or not.

The hard truth is it doesn't seem you have much proclivity at being a very strong player. That is okay. I try hard at chess though lack of discipline does hold me back we all have limitations. Not everyone is trying to actively improve but most chess players do seem to be the type that want to be the best they can.

Oleg_Kovalcuk
sittingraccoondog1103 написал:

(1) I read two books for beginners. With a chess board ready.

(2) I solved over 5000 puzzles in total, including when I was using my previous account.
I was spending at least 30 seconds per problem.

(3) Including the time I was using my previous account, I played 15+10 rapid games over 2000 times in total.
Of course, I reviewed each game and thought about the causes of mistakes and countermeasures.

(4) During a game, I always check before moving.
Checks, captures, threats, etc. Including if I or my opponent are leaving any pieces dangling.
I spend 20-30 seconds on each move.

To be honest, I have been studying chess diligently for about a year.
People here often try to lecture newbies like me about not trying hard enough, but that's disrespectful.

I have tried my best to follow the advice of many people, but
Still, I'm stuck at triple-digit ELO.

Now, what should I try harder than this?
Will I continue to make unrewarding efforts?
Or will I accept that chess is not for me and give up on improving? Or leave?

You cant expect to improve with 22 games doe. You gotta just play. Others got experience off-site, While others got experience on the site. Soo what if you know tactics? Soo what if you analysed?
If you didnt play much, There arent many games to analyse.
Tactics wont help either as there aren't positions where you instantly get your tactics switch turned on just from a gut feeling. In puzzles you know that there IS a tactic and soo you look for it. But in a game?
Honestly, PLAY. No opening can propel you to 1000, Just play. You gotta get experience.
Books cant propel you from 800 to 1000, Not that eazy.
Upon getting thousands of games, You will start seeing patterns and play like a goddamn 1600 already.

Hoffmann713
sittingraccoondog1103 ha scritto:

Aren't we all on this site because we want to get better?

Not everybody. For many, including myself, the main purpose is to play for the pleasure of playing, because chess is beautiful and interesting. Then, there is also the desire to improve (i.e. learn to play better), but without making of it an obsession: one works to improve, but if he doesn't succeed it doesn't matter that much. Anyway, sooner or later the moment comes when you can no longer improve, for many reasons. What remains is the pleasure of playing.

vladimir_ivanov07
Hoffmann713 wrote:
sittingraccoondog1103 ha scritto:

Aren't we all on this site because we want to get better?

Not everybody. For many, including myself, the main purpose is to play for the pleasure of playing, because chess is beautiful and interesting. Then, there is also the desire to improve (i.e. learn to play better), but without making of it an obsession: one works to improve, but if he doesn't succeed it doesn't matter that much. Anyway, sooner or later the moment comes when you can no longer improve, for many reasons. What remains is the pleasure of playing.

Acutally in OP's post he mentioned he had a previous account

Hoffmann713
vladimir_ivanov07 ha scritto:
Hoffmann713 wrote:
sittingraccoondog1103 ha scritto:

Aren't we all on this site because we want to get better?

Not everybody. For many, including myself, the main purpose is to play for the pleasure of playing, because chess is beautiful and interesting. Then, there is also the desire to improve (i.e. learn to play better), but without making of it an obsession: one works to improve, but if he doesn't succeed it doesn't matter that much. Anyway, sooner or later the moment comes when you can no longer improve, for many reasons. What remains is the pleasure of playing.

Acutally in OP's post he mentioned he had a previous account

Maybe you wanted to reply to message #9, I guess.

Chesseus2024

I just beat a 1000 elo player since starting chess approx 12 months ago.

my advice:

1. go and play in real world

2. buy a chess board, buy a notepad, a pen, buy a timer and when playing online play as if you were playing over the board, write down the moves.

this will provide a more realistic psychological experience.

Gl I look forward to a challenge asap

GMegasDoux

You are over 900. Not to far from 1000, keep at it. You will get there. Also after 1 year from scratch that is a good rating.

1nvyncibleone

I'm getting into Chess for the first time. My late brother was the Chess player in the family, but I've played other competitive games at a high level which require strategy. Your problem is one of mindset. I've seen it before in other games. You're stressed, and not playful. These problems will never leave you until you correct your mentality. Correct your mindset and more than your Chess ELO will improve.

checkmated0001

You seem to have a positive win-rate, I doubt you'll be below 1000 for more than another month or so. I would say to try and work on consistency though, since your accuracy seems to vary anywhere from 85-90% to around 40%. Otherwise, you're doing pretty well.

ChessMasteryOfficial

To most of my students, I give this advice (and it's all they need):


The biggest reason people struggle in lower-level chess is because of blunders. They make them in almost every game.

A mistake can instantly put you in a bad position, no matter how well you played earlier: if you had great opening knowledge, great positional skills, great endgame skills, whatever; a single mistake can change everything (you lose a piece or get checkmated).


So, how do you avoid blunders? Follow these two simple steps:

1. After your opponent moves, think if it's dangerous. Ask yourself, “What’s his idea?”
2. Before you make your move, think if it's safe. Ask yourself, “What attacking replies can he play?”


If you feel like getting to levels like 1600, 1800, or 2000 in chess is super hard, let's look at it in a different way. Those players you're facing make blunders in nearly every game they play. Beating them isn't so tough if you stop making big mistakes and start using their slip-ups to your advantage.

Again, it does not require you to become a chess nerd or spend all your time on chess. Just doing this one thing can boost your rating by a few hundred points right away.

sittingraccoondog1103
JGambit はこう書きました:
sittingraccoondog1103 wrote:

3) . . .Of course, I reviewed each game and thought about the causes of mistakes and countermeasures.

(4) During a game, I always check before moving.
Checks, captures, threats, etc. Including if I or my opponent are leaving any pieces dangling.
I spend 20-30 seconds on each move.

I'm stuck at triple-digit ELO.

Now, what should I try harder than this?
Will I continue to make unrewarding efforts?
Or will I accept that chess is not for me and give up on improving? Or leave?

Very hard to believe points 3 and 4 and being stuck at 800, I think I should look at some of your games for insight. There isn't a situation where I could see someone actually doing that and not being 1400 on here or at least 1200. Chess is for anyone who enjoys playing it so you get to decide to play or not.

The hard truth is it doesn't seem you have much proclivity at being a very strong player. That is okay. I try hard at chess though lack of discipline does hold me back we all have limitations. Not everyone is trying to actively improve but most chess players do seem to be the type that want to be the best they can.

Does that mean I'm too stupid to play chess properly? Did I just throw this past year away for nothing? Should I stop?

Thank you for your valuable feedback.

sittingraccoondog1103
ChessMasteryOfficial はこう書きました:

To most of my students, I give this advice (and it's all they need):


The biggest reason people struggle in lower-level chess is because of blunders. They make them in almost every game.

A mistake can instantly put you in a bad position, no matter how well you played earlier: if you had great opening knowledge, great positional skills, great endgame skills, whatever; a single mistake can change everything (you lose a piece or get checkmated).


So, how do you avoid blunders? Follow these two simple steps:

1. After your opponent moves, think if it's dangerous. Ask yourself, “What’s his idea?”
2. Before you make your move, think if it's safe. Ask yourself, “What attacking replies can he play?”


If you feel like getting to levels like 1600, 1800, or 2000 in chess is super hard, let's look at it in a different way. Those players you're facing make blunders in nearly every game they play. Beating them isn't so tough if you stop making big mistakes and start using their slip-ups to your advantage.

Again, it does not require you to become a chess nerd or spend all your time on chess. Just doing this one thing can boost your rating by a few hundred points right away.

I have already done so. But I couldn't improve it at all. It's all over now.

vladimir_ivanov07
Hoffmann713 wrote:
vladimir_ivanov07 ha scritto:
Hoffmann713 wrote:
sittingraccoondog1103 ha scritto:

Aren't we all on this site because we want to get better?

Not everybody. For many, including myself, the main purpose is to play for the pleasure of playing, because chess is beautiful and interesting. Then, there is also the desire to improve (i.e. learn to play better), but without making of it an obsession: one works to improve, but if he doesn't succeed it doesn't matter that much. Anyway, sooner or later the moment comes when you can no longer improve, for many reasons. What remains is the pleasure of playing.

Acutally in OP's post he mentioned he had a previous account

Maybe you wanted to reply to message #9, I guess.

Yes, I did. Sorry, I misclicked