How to study openings?

kindaspongey

http://www.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Sacrifice-and-Initiative-in-Chess-77p3825.htm

http://www.thechessmind.net/blog/2013/11/27/a-quick-review-of-ivan-sokolovs-sacrifice-and-initiative-in.html

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/984.pdf

MorphyManiac
thekokohead wrote:
Hi. I've played some OTB and some online games, and I feel my openings are severely lacking. I've been always told the basics (develop, control the center) and I'll be fine. Now, more and more, I find myself behind in the middlegame. With the opening book on chess.com and any other resource, how can I improve my openings?

tactics tactics tactics, then endgames endgames endgames. oh wait? do want to actually improve? or just think you are learning chess? if all you want to do is delude yourself that you are learning chess then by all means study opening theory and really rely on your engine,

kindaspongey

"... for those that want to be as good as they can be, they'll have to work hard.

Play opponents who are better than you … . Learn basic endgames. Create a simple opening repertoire (understanding the moves are far more important than memorizing them). Study tactics. And pick up tons of patterns. That’s the drumbeat of success. ..." - IM Jeremy Silman (December 27, 2018)

https://www.chess.com/article/view/little-things-that-help-your-game

AlphaZeroDark30
thekokohead wrote:
Hi. I've played some OTB and some online games, and I feel my openings are severely lacking. I've been always told the basics (develop, control the center) and I'll be fine. Now, more and more, I find myself behind in the middlegame. With the opening book on chess.com and any other resource, how can I improve my openings?

Find a player whose style you admire, copy his (or her) repertoire, and then go from there.  

kindaspongey

"... A typical way of choosing an opening repertoire is to copy the openings used by a player one admires. ... However, what is good at world-championship level is not always the best choice at lower levels of play, and it is often a good idea to choose a 'model' who is nearer your own playing strength. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)

Trexler3241

You study an opening by making moves that follow opening principles and stop threats.

AlphaZeroDark30
indaspongey wrote:

"... A typical way of choosing an opening repertoire is to copy the openings used by a player one admires. ... However, what is good at world-championship level is not always the best choice at lower levels of play, and it is often a good idea to choose a 'model' who is nearer your own playing strength. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)

That depends on whether or not one wants to STAY low-rated.  My first repertoire was GM-level so I never had to change it as my rating went up unless I wanted to.  It also leads to better games, and it's a good starting point.