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I am 2200 rated in puzzles and 1000 rated blitz

ansicplusplus

Can someone help close the gap? 

justbefair
ansicplusplus wrote:

Can someone help close the gap? 

There is no gap. The puzzle rating reflects mostly the fact that you like to do puzzles and have spent a lot of time doing them.

Look at the Puzzles Leaderboard.  The leader has 65,000 points.  Do you think he's 20 times as good at tactics as Magnus Carlsen?

ansicplusplus
justbefair wrote:
ansicplusplus wrote:

Can someone help close the gap? 

There is no gap. The puzzle rating reflects mostly the fact that you like to do puzzles and have spent a lot of time doing them.

Look at the Puzzles Leaderboard.  The leader has 65,000 points.  Do you think he's 20 times as good at tactics as Magnus Carlsen?

your answer is like magnus carlsen chess rating is nothing .it reflects mostly the fact that he likes to play chess and spent a lot of time doing them.

 

ansicplusplus
justbefair wrote:
ansicplusplus wrote:

Can someone help close the gap? 

There is no gap. The puzzle rating reflects mostly the fact that you like to do puzzles and have spent a lot of time doing them.

Look at the Puzzles Leaderboard.  The leader has 65,000 points.  Do you think he's 20 times as good at tactics as Magnus Carlsen?

you are saying there is no significance of puzzles in chess rating. please some good player answer the question

Kamikuma597

the others are right. 
The only things that'll help you practice blitz would have to be time management, precognition, and your ability to focus at all points. As with any game, a player should begin by limiting all types of blunders, getting creative, and learning to convert any and all chances. If you analyze and keep at your chess for long enough, you should be able to get better at blitz constantly. 

ansicplusplus
Kamikuma597 wrote:

the others are right. 
The only things that'll help you practice blitz would have to be time management, precognition, and your ability to focus at all points. As with any game, a player should begin by limiting all types of blunders, getting creative, and learning to convert any and all chances. If you analyze and keep at your chess for long enough, you should be able to get better at blitz constantly. 

any tips on how to get started?

Kamikuma597
ansicplusplus wrote:
Kamikuma597 wrote:

the others are right. 
The only things that'll help you practice blitz would have to be time management, precognition, and your ability to focus at all points. As with any game, a player should begin by limiting all types of blunders, getting creative, and learning to convert any and all chances. If you analyze and keep at your chess for long enough, you should be able to get better at blitz constantly. 

any tips on how to get started?

I would recommend analyzing your earliest games and seeing how much you have improved by making a short list, and what mistakes remain uncovered, or common, as you kept playing more with time. Also, to get used to the time scarcity predicament, you'd have to learn to trust your instincts at crucial times, and hence you'll have to learn to be able to find good moves sooner, and for that you need to be able to instantly discard blunders and bad moves from your mind. Playing under pressure is one of a chess players best tests. If you think you need to be able to practice brain-storming, and learning to find better moves sooner, play more rapid of upto ~15 minutes, it'll affect development in both Classic and Blitz too. Bullet is a different matter however, so you need to train differently for that grin.png

Kamikuma597

Your puzzles rating being high doesn't mean you are good at a certain time control, since its entirely two different situations, it will take time to get better, they almost never happen simultaneously.

QwertPolk
any tips on how to get started?

First of all, playing longer time-controls really improves your chess. In blitz, you mainly rely on intuition and rarely calculate something, and if you do, you only go a few moves deep. If you play 15+10 for example, you get the opportunity to use your tactical skills and really understand the position you are in. Also, analysis is the key: After any game, draw, loss or win, you have to go back and figure out what the critical moments in the game were and where you went wrong/could have played something better. Try it first on yourself and then check with an engine.

This was the practical part, but if you are looking for something more theoretical, there are many great resources online. You can for example read an analysis of some grandmaster games, you can study an opening and learn the ideas behind it, you can just in general look for excercises and concepts regarding positional chess, like pawn-structure, piece-placement, kingsafety, etc.

Kamikuma597

For candidate moves, i really recommend this one:
https://www.chess.com/lessons/candidate-moves

ChxtNoir
My question for you is whether you use your tactical skills during games.
ansicplusplus
Kamikuma597 wrote:
ansicplusplus wrote:
Kamikuma597 wrote:

the others are right. 
The only things that'll help you practice blitz would have to be time management, precognition, and your ability to focus at all points. As with any game, a player should begin by limiting all types of blunders, getting creative, and learning to convert any and all chances. If you analyze and keep at your chess for long enough, you should be able to get better at blitz constantly. 

any tips on how to get started?

I would recommend analyzing your earliest games and seeing how much you have improved by making a short list, and what mistakes remain uncovered, or common, as you kept playing more with time. Also, to get used to the time scarcity predicament, you'd have to learn to trust your instincts at crucial times, and hence you'll have to learn to be able to find good moves sooner, and for that you need to be able to instantly discard blunders and bad moves from your mind. Playing under pressure is one of a chess players best tests. If you think you need to be able to practice brain-storming, and learning to find better moves sooner, play more rapid of upto ~15 minutes, it'll affect development in both Classic and Blitz too. Bullet is a different matter however, so you need to train differently for that

thanks man

ansicplusplus
QwertPolk wrote:
any tips on how to get started?

First of all, playing longer time-controls really improves your chess. In blitz, you mainly rely on intuition and rarely calculate something, and if you do, you only go a few moves deep. If you play 15+10 for example, you get the opportunity to use your tactical skills and really understand the position you are in. Also, analysis is the key: After any game, draw, loss or win, you have to go back and figure out what the critical moments in the game were and where you went wrong/could have played something better. Try it first on yourself and then check with an engine.

This was the practical part, but if you are looking for something more theoretical, there are many great resources online. You can for example read an analysis of some grandmaster games, you can study an opening and learn the ideas behind it, you can just in general look for excercises and concepts regarding positional chess, like pawn-structure, piece-placement, kingsafety, etc.

thanks bro

AunTheKnight

Tactics rating doesn’t have to do anything with chess rating. It shows how good you are at calculations, spotting patterns, etc.

Netboss12

try playing slower games and work on your openings thats what got me from 1200 to 1700 while still working on tactics for pattern recognition 

ansicplusplus
Netboss12 wrote:

try playing slower games and work on your openings thats what got me from 1200 to 1700 while still working on tactics for pattern recognition 

thanks