What goal for an adult beginner

Laskersnephew

I know we are uniquely blessed with chess opportunities in my area, but between New Jersey, New York City, and Philadelphia, I could easily play in two quads (6 rated games) every week and 4 or five open tournaments in a year. 250 rated games in a year wouldn't be at all difficult. Assuming I was continuously improving (big assumption!) my rating would go up quite quickly. But the OP is actually from France, and I don't know which part of France, so I have no idea what his playing opportunities are. And, of course, he didn't ask about becoming a FIDE Master, just about what kind of improvement he could lexpect

awang15

learn english

BubbaCox0

Good lord, i'm way behind on this.  At 55yo and living in the middle of Alaska, there won't be a lot of opportunity for me.  That said, i have always enjoyed the game poorly, never went beyond plying it as a glorified game of checkers.  But now, i see the potential in my grand kids, and the fun to be had with them.  AND, they will have many more opportunities at their ages than I will, so I'll learn with them and see how far they can go.  A little depressing to realize I'll be watching instead of participating like i did in my 20-40's but fun none the less.

DeirdreSkye
Laskersnephew wrote:

I know we are uniquely blessed with chess opportunities in my area, but between New Jersey, New York City, and Philadelphia, I could easily play in two quads (6 rated games) every week and 4 or five open tournaments in a year. 250 rated games in a year wouldn't be at all difficult. Assuming I was continuously improving (big assumption!) my rating would go up quite quickly. But the OP is actually from France, and I don't know which part of France, so I have no idea what his playing opportunities are. And, of course, he didn't ask about becoming a FIDE Master, just about what kind of improvement he could lexpect

      I answered a post saying that with determination everything is possible and I explained that "determination" in chess means  "determined to spend a lot of money" and that in turn requires that you either have them or you can somehow find them.

andrewnox

It may be easier, and faster, with a lot of money, but it isn't completely necessary. 

DeirdreSkye
andrewnox wrote:

It may be easier, and faster, with a lot of money, but it isn't completely necessary. 

      I think very few understand the real difficulties of chess .The ability to travel and play all year against strong opponents is absolutely critical , today even more than ever. 

Caruana left his home for 10 years and moved to Europe where he was playing in every strong open tournament he could find (almsot 100 rated games every year). According to him , that turned him from a promising young player to a top player.

     Awonder Liang claimed in an interview that lack of funds has prevented him from improving.

      Even if you are lucky to live in a  place with easy access to a lot of strong tournaments , just playing in them means you have to abandon everything else. No college , no work , just chess.How many can afford that?

    Gata Kamsky had to stop chess for 7 years to finish law school.When he returned after 7 years inactivity he was no longer No 4 in the world and his rating continue to drop. You think he was less talented than Caruana?       I don't think so , he just didn't have the money to live in Europe for 10 years and do nothing else except playing chess.

DamonevicSmithlov

Kamsky could've been world champ had he not "retired" for that long stretch. Wasn't he only 21 or so when he lost the title match to Karpov? He won the U.S. title at 17 and he beat in matches both Anand AND Kramnik on the way to the match with Karpov. Let me repeat that: he beat both Anand and Kramnik in extended matches during the world Championship cycle on his way to challenge Karpov. He was a legit title contender with enormous talent.

DeirdreSkye

     Kamsky is not the only talent that was wasted because of lack of funds. Who remembers Tal Shaked? A kid that won the world junior championship ahead of 2 of the most talented prodigies of his time(Morozevich and Ponomariov). He gave up competitive chess a few years later and guess what the reason was. Yup ,lack of funds.

    

kindaspongey

"... On the one hand, your play needs to be purposeful much of the time; the ability to navigate through many different types of positions needs to be yours; your ability to calculate variations and find candidate moves needs to be present in at least an embryonic stage. On the other hand, it will be heart-warming and perhaps inspiring to realize that you do not need to give up blunders or misconceptions or a poor memory or sloppy calculating habits; that you do not need to know all the latest opening variations, or even know what they are called. You do not have to memorize hundreds of endgame positions or instantly recognize the proper procedure in a variety of pawn structures.
[To play at a master level consistently] is not an easy task, to be sure ..., but it is a possible one. ..." - NM Peter Kurzdorfer (2015)

ZappiestTom

Allebonx wrote:

Hello happy.png

I started chess very late at 32 coaches.png about 10 months ago. I started from scratch, at the point I had to learn "en passant" and the very basics of the game. In about 8 months of serious practice every day I went from 900 to 1300 chess.com Elo (at peak), then took a brake about 2 months and now  struggling to come back over 1200. 

I do not believe being particularly gifted for the game but need some guidance on where to put my goal. What kind of Elo should I except and aim for about the end of the year, a year after etc... 

It seams that the easiest part of progress is behind me and it apparently do not help to start as an adult. I can expect practice about 10 hours a week, playing, analysing, tactic and some online lessons diamond.png when I have time. 

I have no clue about the average performance over the years of adult beginners like me who practice regularly. Should I expect a year of stagnation  or is it possible to steadily gain 100 elo/year on the first years lessons.png ? 

(I know the Elo is not the goal here, but it reflect what I mean by that, playing and understanding better the game thumbup.png)

Cheers

honestly, I'm a great believer in practice makes perfect. just keep playing and learn from your mistakes. if having a goal of 1500 elo is your key go for it. hell I'll give you a game if you fancy.