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2017 Alabama State Scholastic Chess Championship Games

  • #1

    Hey guys..so here im going to show you my games from the 2017 Alabama State Scholastic Chess Championship....plz tell me what you think :)

     

    Round 1:

     

    Round 2:         

    Round 3: 

    Round 4:  

    so i finished the tourny 3-4 and tied for 2nd (of course,i got 7th on tie-breaks...i never have any luck with the tie-breaks) Tell me what yall think! thanks!

  • #2

    Cool, two games ended with Qg2#.

    Nice job getting a good position against Arden. Let's hope your win-conversion ability will improve with time!

  • #3

    Edit;i finished 3/4..not 3-4

  • #4
    Axonn wrote:

    Cool, two games ended with Qg2#.

    Nice job getting a good position against Arden. Let's hope your win-conversion ability will improve with time!

    Thanks :)

  • #5

    lol didnt realize 2 ended with Qg2#...cool

  • #6

    UPDATE: my rating went up from 1461-1472

  • #7

    Good Job!

  • #8

    Ok. So, in game one, you did really good in taking advantage of his mistake, but I do think you made a mistake with 13. f4 because you drop the pawn on e4. Nd2 would've been much better, developing a piece and defending e4. Overall, game 1 was a breeze. Game 2 isn't worth discussing.

    I'm not an expert in the Grand Prix, so I won't talk about the opening, but didn't seem like playing c4 and leaving the position closed was the best idea. By doing that you're allowing that pawn on d4 to restrict all of your pieces while you can't do anything about it. My candidate moves there would be Rc1, Rb1 and Nf2. When you played h4, your opponent could've replied with f5, but he played Ne7 and allowed himself to slowly get suffocated. Then when you played Nc4, I think your plan was to go to d6 but I think you missed that after the trades on e4 and Nd6 black could play Qg4 and sacrifice the exchange. You would be in a lot of trouble if you were not careful. Luckily he went passive with Nc8. And it's sad to hear you couldn't get the draw at least. It's happened to all of us.

    Game 4 was also a walk in the park, so I won't discuss it.  Hope I helped.

    Note: I didn't use an engine, so you may want to double check what I said.

  • #9
    LouStule wrote:

    Good Job!

    thx :)

  • #10
    Indirect wrote:

    Ok. So, in game one, you did really good in taking advantage of his mistake, but I do think you made a mistake with 13. f4 because you drop the pawn on e4. Nd2 would've been much better, developing a piece and defending e4. Overall, game 1 was a breeze. Game 2 isn't worth discussing.

    I'm not an expert in the Grand Prix, so I won't talk about the opening, but didn't seem like playing c4 and leaving the position closed was the best idea. By doing that you're allowing that pawn on d4 to restrict all of your pieces while you can't do anything about it. My candidate moves there would be Rc1, Rb1 and Nf2. When you played h4, your opponent could've replied with f5, but he played Ne7 and allowed himself to slowly get suffocated. Then when you played Nc4, I think your plan was to go to d6 but I think you missed that after the trades on e4 and Nd6 black could play Qg4 and sacrifice the exchange. You would be in a lot of trouble if you were not careful. Luckily he went passive with Nc8. And it's sad to hear you couldn't get the draw at least. It's happened to all of us.

    Game 4 was also a walk in the park, so I won't discuss it.  Hope I helped.

    Note: I didn't use an engine, so you may want to double check what I said.

    thx...that is helpful, now that i have looked at that,i think ur right but, i only had 5 mins left by then :) thx

  • #11

    Nothing to analyze for the most part. Three of your opponents were beginners and blundered all their pieces, and the other one wasn't, and of course the critical moments of that game happened after you stopped notating. 

     

    Can you remember any of the moves after you stopped? For future advice, whenever you have a game like that, you should sit down at a board later that day, even between rounds, when you have time and work out what happened after the notation stopped. You're a 1500+ level player probably, and young enough to be playing in a scholastic event (no idea what your actual age is- guessing a bit on the younger side- but that's a little besides the point), so you should be able to remember the moves that were played if you revisit the position later that day. But after a day or two the short-term memory might wear off, which I'm guessing is what happened. So that's why I recommend doing it as soon as possible after the game.

     

    Overall though I think you did fine against the 2100 up until whatever happened in the time pressure. High rated players also don't know what they're doing. They just make it look like they do happy.png 

  • #12

    On that note, (not saying you did), don't ever tell anyone you're scared of playing them. I was once scared of playing someone — and after I played them, it turned out they were also scared of me! Ah, chessplayers.

  • #13
    dpnorman wrote:

    Nothing to analyze for the most part. Three of your opponents were beginners and blundered all their pieces, and the other one wasn't, and of course the critical moments of that game happened after you stopped notating. 

     

    Can you remember any of the moves after you stopped? For future advice, whenever you have a game like that, you should sit down at a board later that day, even between rounds, when you have time and work out what happened after the notation stopped. You're a 1500+ level player probably, and young enough to be playing in a scholastic event (no idea what your actual age is- guessing a bit on the younger side- but that's a little besides the point), so you should be able to remember the moves that were played if you revisit the position later that day. But after a day or two the short-term memory might wear off, which I'm guessing is what happened. So that's why I recommend doing it as soon as possible after the game.

     

    Overall though I think you did fine against the 2100 up until whatever happened in the time pressure. High rated players also don't know what they're doing. They just make it look like they do  

    ok...i dont remember,,,sorry

  • #14

    lol they werent begginers...1  was playing 4 years,the other  like 2 :P

  • #15

    im 12,btw

  • #16

    You're not bad for 12. 

  • #17
    taechess wrote:

    lol they werent begginers...1  was playing 4 years,the other  like 2 :P

    I think it's generally considered that 1200-level and below is beginner skill-level, no?

  • #18

    I'd say so. My cutoff for beginner is like 1400 USCF, since you see a lot of silly mistakes below there in easy positions. It certainly doesn't matter how long you've been playing though.

  • #19
    dpnorman wrote:
    taechess wrote:

    lol they werent begginers...1  was playing 4 years,the other  like 2 :P

    I think it's generally considered that 1200-level and below is beginner skill-level, no?

    yeah i guess so...

  • #20
    Cherub_Enjel wrote:

    I'd say so. My cutoff for beginner is like 1400 USCF, since you see a lot of silly mistakes below there in easy positions. It certainly doesn't matter how long you've been playing though.

    why doesnt it matter? with that logic,you could be playing for 20 years and be a beginner :)

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