Any suggestions to improve my endgames. Please guide if I am going right in my gameplay or not.

nitshar06

Rat1960

19. Marks the point of a double rook endgame.
19. f3 g6 20. Kf2 f5 21. Ke3 Kf7 That would be the first point, centralise your king.

It would be great if c3, b4 (a5xb4) c3xb4 happened assuming the black rook is off the a-file or white has a rook on the a-file. Black of course would not be helpful like that. Meaning no q-side counterplay.

Since the game went the way it did I am guessing you did not blockade the king side.
Looking at the game moves (but not playing it) I think Rd5 and Re3 are suspicious. 
23. Re3 ? Kf6 24. g3 f4 25. gxf4 ? gxf4 is all bad news for team white.  I would have wanted g4, h3 and the rooks covering the half-open h-file if need be with the king on e3/d3.

Hope that helps a little.

DiscipleOfKeres

To improve on endgames, first learn basic endgames. These include, but are not limited to : king and pawn, rook and pawn, outside passed pawns, central passed pawns, two minor pieces vs rook, two rooks vs queen, queen and king, rook and king, minor pieces vs king, connected pass pawns, the lucena mechanism, the philidor position, and various promotion methods. Another way to improve on endgames is to solve and develop an appreciation for endgame studies. The last way to improve is to study master games, like Capablanca, Rubinstein, and Botvinnik.

kindaspongey

I am far from being an endgame wiz, but my guess is that the critical mistake is 34.Rb4, ignoring the advancing g-pawn.

nitshar06
Rat1960 wrote:

19. Marks the point of a double rook endgame.
19. f3 g6 20. Kf2 f5 21. Ke3 Kf7 That would be the first point, centralise your king.

It would be great if c3, b4 (a5xb4) c3xb4 happened assuming the black rook is off the a-file or white has a rook on the a-file. Black of course would not be helpful like that. Meaning no q-side counterplay.

Since the game went the way it did I am guessing you did not blockade the king side.
Looking at the game moves (but not playing it) I think Rd5 and Re3 are suspicious. 
23. Re3 ? Kf6 24. g3 f4 25. gxf4 ? gxf4 is all bad news for team white.  I would have wanted g4, h3 and the rooks covering the half-open h-file if need be with the king on e3/d3.

Hope that helps a little.

thank you sir.

nitshar06
DiscipleOfKeres wrote:

To improve on endgames, first learn basic endgames. These include, but are not limited to : king and pawn, rook and pawn, outside passed pawns, central passed pawns, two minor pieces vs rook, two rooks vs queen, queen and king, rook and king, minor pieces vs king, connected pass pawns, the lucena mechanism, the philidor position, and various promotion methods. Another way to improve on endgames is to solve and develop an appreciation for endgame studies. The last way to improve is to study master games, like Capablanca, Rubinstein, and Botvinnik.

thank you sir.

nitshar06
kindaspongey wrote:

I am far from being an endgame wiz, but my guess is that the critical mistake is 34.Rb4, ignoring the advancing g-pawn.

hmm

kindaspongey

"... I'm convinced that Silman's [Complete Endgame Course] will take its place in history as one of the most popular endgame books ever. ... He writes in a clear and casual style, and time and again has shown the ability to reach those who feel intimidated by the lofty approach that a grandmaster will often take. ... he defines what he thinks is necessary to know at specific rating levels. ..." - IM John Watson (2007)

http://theweekinchess.com/john-watson-reviews/theres-an-end-to-it-all