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first OTB tournament

  • #1
    https://www.chess.com/analysis-board-editor?diagram_id=3722128
  • #2

    this is from round 1 of my first tournament in playing black and loose.

  • #3
     

     

  • #4

    Meh. My advice is simple: Either stop playing the Scandinavian Defense, or learn how to play it correctly: don't retreat your queen completely (3...Qd8?!), don't pin on White's kingside (5...Bg4?!) because he normally castles queenside and doesn't care what you do over there on the kingside, don't fianchetto in that defense (9...g6) since you're already fighting to regain at least one tempo, don't create an outward pointing pawn structure (15...b5?!), and don't exchange off your protective fianchettoed bishop (20...Bxg5?!).

  • #5

    Thanks for that advice, I do think I will stop playing the Scandinavian

  • #6
    Brandooooo έγραψε:

    Thanks for that advice, I do think I will stop playing the Scandinavian

    The Scandinavian is OK, and the 3...Qd8 variation you have played is quite good.

    You played the opening phase a tad passively, but this hardly matters: after 17 moves, Black was at least equal, I guess I would pick Black if I was asked to make a choice.

    Your mistakes came way later on (after move 30), and these are irrelevant to the opening.

  • #7

    I think the moves for both sides just kinda lacked purpose. lots of piece shuffling. It didn't look like there was much effort to create or exploit any weakness.

  • #8
    Sqod wrote:

    Meh. My advice is simple: Either stop playing the Scandinavian Defense, or learn how to play it correctly: don't retreat your queen completely (3...Qd8?!), don't pin on White's kingside (5...Bg4?!) because he normally castles queenside and doesn't care what you do over there on the kingside, don't fianchetto in that defense (9...g6) since you're already fighting to regain at least one tempo, don't create an outward pointing pawn structure (15...b5?!), and don't exchange off your protective fianchettoed bishop (20...Bxg5?!).

    I am not a scandinavian player so I'm not that familiar with theory, but as far as I know 3...Qd8 and 3...Qa5 are the viable moves that both lead to main lines

  • #9

     Your first OTB tournament is less about establishing the absolute truth and validity of your opening repertoire, and more about yourself as a competitor; especially how you adapt to various tournament situations. So relax. You blew a game where, coming out of the opening, you had pretty much equalised as black. Looking a little later, (let's take move 17, as it was pfren's point of focus), you were possibly outplaying white. But that's not the opening, that's the early middlegame. Yes, for today's grandmasters opening analysis extends pretty deeply into the middlegame; but for lesser mortals, that period in the game, around moves 12 to 15, is a critical transition. We have to  think for ourselves, to try to understand the position in both general and concrete terms. That's where the real game starts. White didn't manage it very well, and you retained your poise for a while. You were holding it together. That's something to take away. Yes, you blew it later, and you'll also learn from finding your mistakes. But this game wasn't a disaster. It was a lesson in several parts.

      @Vercingetorix75: Isn't planlessness endemic among weaker players? (I'm including myself here. The wisdom of experience; I know this is so often typical of my play, and its something I strive to overcome. Not with much satisfaction, though) I think of it as a symptom. The player (or both players) cannot find a plan for some reason. So why?

    I once read an interview with a grandmaster, I think it was Kevin Spraggett, BICBW, and to loosely paraphrase him, until a player is 2300, all he is doing is just learning the fundamentals. We can argue about whether that figure should go up or down and by how much, but the thrust of the statement would seem to be; that people who have not mastered the fundamentals are not masters, and cannot expect to achieve or maintain master level ratings, whilst masters have put in the grunt work in all aspects of the game and have the nescesary range of skills to compete against other masters in a wide variety of situations. Even when they are going through rough patches. So we, who are not worthy, pull out the collected wisdoms of Capablanca and Alekhin, Botvinnik and Keres and Tal, Fischer and others. And learn what plans are possible from those who made the first plans. No; learn that plans are possible.

    Good hunting.

  • #10

    I'm not sure the idea behind 15. b5. Yeah, it kicks the bishop but leaves c6 weak which is going to make b5 tenuous. Unless it has something to do with opening up the b file and using the a1 diagonal and b2 square for something. Otherwise going against the pawn majority with the B over there might be kind of optimistic. Especially with the awkward N on d7.

    Maybe something like 15...Nb6 gets you the same tempo, 16. Ba2 then ...Nd5 with double attack on c3 and queen. White probably 17.  Nxd5 then ...cxd5 might give White a bad B and limited opportunities on the e file without some sort of sac. But Black could get better B with more chances on c file.

    If all that is accurate, it would appear that black's opening was fine.

  • #11

       Your opening was fine.Don't listen to nonsense that you must stop playing Scandinavian.

       You don't change your openings once a tournament has started.That is a huge mistake that many amateurs do.Play what you know , and after the tournament ends analyse the games and decide what to do.

       Personally I wouldn't fiancheto the bishop but despite that inaccuracy you were still fine.

     

     

    For first tournament , that was a great game.

    Good opening , good middlegame but bad endgame.

    It was obvious that after the fall of the pawn on c5 , you were very disheartened.I will assume that you also were tired.

    All these are understandable.You need more games.Once you are more experienced you will play much better.

    Studying endgame wouldn't hurt.It was by far your weakest point.

    Good luck! 

  • #12

    wow everyone thank you for these tips, advice, and encouragement. I will personally try and make a full analysis of this game I do have a very busy schedule but I will try and do it in a week or so and I'll repost the game. I did go into this tournament unrated of course it was my first tournament and I went 2 wins and 3 losses. so I am definitely a rookie so I'm not sure how good my analysis will be.

  • #13

    6 Bxf7+

  • #14
    Zaphys wrote:

    6 Bxf7+

     

    That is excellent! I didn't realize that early opening trick. I guess to really be OK it's probably best...Nf6 and then if Bc4 either ...e6 or maybe an immediate ...Bg4 and then ...e6.

    Is Zaphys Carlsen?

     

  • #15

    Snap, I've been exposed.

    Bg4 is fine against 5 Nf3, in fact it's the main line, but against 5 Bc4 it's best to play c6 and Bf5. You don't want to play e6 while your bishop is still on c8. Just a few weeks ago some club mates of mine played a game in which the exact same motive occurred:

    It was a Budapest Gambit with 3 d5, which is bad because after 3...Bc5 Black has firm control over the central dark squares. After 4 Bg5?? even 4...Ne4 could be considered rather than 4...Bxf2+.

  • #16
    Sqod wrote:

    Meh. My advice is simple: Either stop playing the Scandinavian Defense, or learn how to play it correctly: don't retreat your queen completely (3...Qd8?!), don't pin on White's kingside (5...Bg4?!) because he normally castles queenside and doesn't care what you do over there on the kingside, don't fianchetto in that defense (9...g6) since you're already fighting to regain at least one tempo, don't create an outward pointing pawn structure (15...b5?!), and don't exchange off your protective fianchettoed bishop (20...Bxg5?!).

    Uhh...

    This is a valid line John Bartholomew (Chessable) recommends. I use it often with decent results. It's actually better than what most people think - once you trade off your LSB for their knight, you try and put your pawns on light squares to block the activity of their LSB. You can also aim for queenside play with moves like ...a5 and central play with moves like ...c5 or ...e5.

    However, I agree with the advice not to fianchetto - usually, in these lines, you only play ...g6 if he's lining up a queen-bishop battery pointed towards the h7 pawn. I also agree with the advice not to play ...b5 - you shouldn't disturb your very solid pawn structure. I've learned the hard way in blitz, where the pawn on c6 became a liability to defend.

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