How can I learn to play like my opponent

BasicChess22

So I've come to kind of a realization in my chess skills. I'm pretty bad at playing attacking style players haha. I got outmatched by someone I would consider a very strong player. I tried to get a rematch but alas they must have been bored by my play, which sucks but I cant make anyone do anything. I feel like I have a ton to learn from this game. I made some big mistakes yes I know but in the middle game I felt like I was ahead and then just. BAM BAM BAM tactic after tactic my opponent just laid me over. 

 

I was so fascinated by the creativity that I couldn't help but laugh at myself. It was the kind of beautiful chess game that I was looking to play. Much like a quote I remember reading about some chess legend. "A brilliancy can only happen in a game of chess when your opponent makes a mistake". And well today it was me who made the error.

 

I was black in the game

 

 

I know to many of you this game will seem trivial and that I played like an absolute patzer but to me this game marked an important realization in my chess so I thought I would share it with you all. Please don't be too harsh on me I have a long way to go.

 

How does one get better at this style of chess? Any has any ways they like to practice to keep their mind sharp in very sharp lines? I can play the dull positional style better than most at my level (that I am aware of, not bragging) but its this style that I struggle with

Disobeyed_Teen
[COMMENT DELETED]
Rat1960

Did not see 3. ... Nxe4 hmmmm.
At 5. ... Well so what about the Knight.
You should have played your ... c6 idea
All ... h6 is drives the knight to influence the centre and makes your krp a target.
7. ... b5 hello ? get on with your plan ... Bc7
9. ... d6, sigh .... d5 - If your e-pawn rolls you can have qbn attacking h2
12. Nh4?? I would have replied to that with ... BxB and then Nxe4
The knight on f5 hurts a lot.
13. ... Na6?? Do I take it you do not see the knight is undefended, attacked by your queen if your knight moves.
15. ... g5?? The king is in an x-ray pin. How do we deal with that? We move the king.
Which is best? h8 ( in case Nh7/g4 is needed)
16. ... Nh5
16. ... h6xBg5 17. Qxg5+ Kh8 18. Nf5 Rg8 19. Qh4+ Nh7
You have Nc5-e6 and queen and rook can get to king cover.
18 fxNg3??
18. BxBc7 NxRf1 19. Bxd6 and three black pieces attacked.
20. ... Kg7?? Kh7 King attacking Knight, Knight attacking Rook. Black Wins.

21. Nf5+ and that is that.

The white attack was feeble, it fell apart, bad move 16. ... but white played terrible 18.
then at 20. .... you moved king to where white could check thus turning a win into a loss. 

BasicChess22

Rat1960 wrote:

Did not see 3. ... Nxe4 hmmmm.
At 5. ... Well so what about the Knight.
You should have played your ... c6 idea
All ... h6 is drives the knight to influence the centre and makes your krp a target.
7. ... b5 hello ? get on with your plan ... Bc7
9. ... d6, sigh .... d5 - If your e-pawn rolls you can have qbn attacking h2
12. Nh4?? I would have replied to that with ... BxB and then Nxe4
The knight on f5 hurts a lot.
13. ... Na6?? Do I take it you do not see the knight is undefended, attacked by your queen if your knight moves.
15. ... g5?? The king is in an x-ray pin. How do we deal with that? We move the king.
Which is best? h8 ( in case Nh7/g4 is needed)
16. ... Nh5
16. ... h6xBg5 17. Qxg5+ Kh8 18. Nf5 Rg8 19. Qh4+ Nh7
You have Nc5-e6 and queen and rook can get to king cover.
18 fxNg3??
18. BxBc7 NxRf1 19. Bxd6 and three black pieces attacked.
20. ... Kg7?? Kh7 King attacking Knight, Knight attacking Rook. Black Wins.

21. Nf5+ and that is that.

The white attack was feeble, it fell apart, bad move 16. ... but white played terrible 18.
then at 20. .... you moved king to where white could check thus turning a win into a loss. 

Hmm yes I wish I could have borrowed your brain for the game. How did you learn to think like that? Just experience or is there a style of training you do to keep your brain sharp?

aggressivesociopath

Calculate more lines. For God's sake your annotations are useless, I already told you that. Here's a sample from the very end of the game.

25. Nd5?! White was clearly winning and centralizing the knight can't be bad, by why not just take the b pawn?

25...Nd4?? loses a piece 25...Bb6+ was preferable, simply because it does not lose a piece.

26. Nxc6? No, 26. Nxd4 is the right way to go about it, Black does not have time to capture the knight because the bishop is hanging.

26...Ne2+?? What the hell, 26. Nxc6 is the way to minimize material loss.

27. Kh2?? 27. Kf2 attacks the knight, even with the Rc8 double attack White comes out a piece ahead.

Ok, White was winning, but did you resign because you thought you lost a piece? 27...Rc8 28. Nxa7 Rxc7 29. Nxb5 Rb7 gives White passed pawns on both sides of the board, but you choose a weird time to resign.

Blunders, blunders, and more blunders. Put some work into it. A no, I don't mean use a computer, put actual work into your annotations.

BasicChess22

aggressivesociopath wrote:

Calculate more lines. For God's sake your annotations are useless, I already told you that. Here's a sample from the very end of the game.

25. Nd5?! White was clearly winning and centralizing the knight can't be bad, by why not just take the b pawn?

25...Nd4?? loses a piece 25...Bb6+ was preferable, simply because it does not lose a piece.

26. Nxc6? No, 26. Nxd4 is the right way to go about it, Black does not have time to capture the knight because the bishop is hanging.

26...Ne2+?? What the hell, 26. Nxc6 is the way to minimize material loss.

27. Kh2?? 27. Kf2 attacks the knight, even with the Rc8 double attack White comes out a piece ahead.

Ok, White was winning, but did you resign because you thought you lost a piece? 27...Rc8 28. Nxa7 Rxc7 29. Nxb5 Rb7 gives White passed pawns on both sides of the board, but you choose a weird time to resign.

Blunders, blunders, and more blunders. Put some work into it. A no, I don't mean use a computer, put actual work into your annotations.

Thanks Einstein

Rat1960

Hmm yes I wish I could have borrowed your brain for the game. How did you learn to think like that? Just experience or is there a style of training you do to keep your brain sharp?

What I do is I scan. (a) unprotected pawns (b) unprotected pieces  (c) attacked material (d) big squares.
So click on 12. Nh4 - I see [none, Ra1, Nh4] [none,Ra8] I see Bc1-e3-h6 BxB
I notice that squares f5 and g6 could be bad news without f7 pawn.
Now I have candidate move ... BxB, but hold on what about the dangling h4 are there any tactics?
Yes I see it is attacked if my knight was not there. Result it can take a pawn getting out of the way.
I also read Play Like A Grandmaster by Kotov. The English version is badly set out ( important topics start half way down a page, rather than fresh page for next important topic )
It is some experience (move the king from an x-ray pin is experience) and some mental discipline.
My brain is well passed sharp. I can go about 10-ply / 5 moves as can be seen at 16. where it is all panic! except of course I can see the board 5 moves later. I also know the best way to blow up a queen attack is to attack their queen with mine. So I can see Qh4+ ( a black square ) Nh7 and the queens are in opposition.
Kotov's book (it is over 40 years old) and has it all. Being Soviet Fischer is mentioned once.
It follows that 60 Memorable Games is also a must. That takes two or three chess sets, because when Fischer goes into variations, it is the full tree.
When I cared, I would play a game on a board, then play through the game in my head just before going to sleep. An example of that Tringov-Fischer 31 Aug 1965 Capablanca Memorial. (22 moves).
Aronian-Kramnik 2018 would be worth knowing, then playing the variations in your head, trying to see the board.

SmithyQ

Here are three things you can do to notice more attacking moves and incorporate them into your game.

First, you need to focus on it.  You need to ask yourself, “What can I attack?” and you need to do this every move.  Look for moves that go forward and threaten something.  When it’s your opponent’s turn, notice which pieces are defending which squares, and try to figure out if you can move, distract or sacrifice for one of them.  If you constantly think like this, you will start to see more attacking moves; most of them won't work, but if you find one that does, you get to win in spectacular fashion.  (I’m not saying you need to attack from move 1, but you need to be thinking about it, evaluating whether it is possible.)

Second, keep in mind the theory of attackers vs defenders.  As a general rule, you need more attackers than defenders to launch a successful attack.  The more attackers there are compared to defenders, the more likely a potential sacrifice will work.  Notice how in your game, you only had your Knight near your King, whereas White had his Queen, Knight and Bishop.  It made sense of White to think about that sacrifice, because he had more attackers than defenders (whether the sacrifice is sound is another question, and the simple Nf5 gives White a large advantage).

In short, if you notice (of if you can force) your opponent putting pieces mostly on side of the board, look for attacking opportunities on the other side, or in the centre.

Lastly, a very good teaching tool is to study miniature games.  These are games of less than 25 moves, generally won by pretty tactical attacks.  If you study these games, you will see how opening mistakes can allow for swift destruction, and you will learn many common motifs and patterns.  The classic book ‘Chess: 5334 Puzzles, Combinations and Drills’ (or whatever the exact title is) has 600 miniature games.  They aren’t annotated, but they are organized by theme (eg, sacrifice on f7) and are great study material.  There are many other resources as well, but I used the above and greatly improved my early attacking skills when I was younger.

MickinMD

I'd like to help and if this awful game was representative of your play, it would be easy to point out things you need to improve.  But outside of this one, you won 7 of your last 8. and they were all 30 min, on the clock or longer games. In that one loss, you were a Pawn ahead and ahead on time and had a decent position, yet you resigned!

In your loss before that one, the game only went 6 moves, was even, yet you resigned.

In your loss before that, your opponent allowed his Queen to get pinned to his King by your Bishop - AND YOU DIDN"T TAKE THE QUEEN!

I don't know what to suggest.  If you're playing stoned - stop doing it.

Rat1960

#9 @MickinMD
"In your loss before that one, the game only went 6 moves, was even, yet you resigned."
I think I saw that one? The slightly strange Ruy Lopez exchange variation (... b7xBc6) that dropped a pawn but which a ... Qe7 would have got back (after a q-side tour). Slightly stronger white player.

jonnin

this game looks like you just got caught by the opening, to be honest.  This opening is one I play and it often leads to massive attacks on the kingside castled opponent.  You correctly got rid of the bishop pointed at your castled king, but you did not seem to know what to do after that.  H6 is a known tactical target and Na3 is a wasted move. g5 is a disaster.  You are going to bleed here, but g5 is a beheading.  Kh7 maybe?  Not really sure, everything seems dangerous but you need to get a knight and that queen up there to counter the attack, and fast. 

 

All that aside, ...  learning to attack is or to play some way or another is just another way of asking how to learn the game, really.   You can learn some openings that lead to a more active or attacking game.  You can practice tactics, so you can spot attacks.   You can learn patterns, like the attack h6 theme against a castled black position.   You can try to study the game deeper ... set your PC opponent as white, yourself as black, and try to do to it what he did to you, then observe how it defends and makes that not happen and then attacks you and beats you up and down the board happy.png    Doing a lot of that is not productive, but on the occasional game, the PC can enlighten you in short order. 

 

 

 

 

BasicChess22
jonnin wrote:

this game looks like you just got caught by the opening, to be honest.  This opening is one I play and it often leads to massive attacks on the kingside castled opponent.  You correctly got rid of the bishop pointed at your castled king, but you did not seem to know what to do after that.  H6 is a known tactical target and Na3 is a wasted move. g5 is a disaster.  You are going to bleed here, but g5 is a beheading.  Kh7 maybe?  Not really sure, everything seems dangerous but you need to get a knight and that queen up there to counter the attack, and fast. 

 

All that aside, ...  learning to attack is or to play some way or another is just another way of asking how to learn the game, really.   You can learn some openings that lead to a more active or attacking game.  You can practice tactics, so you can spot attacks.   You can learn patterns, like the attack h6 theme against a castled black position.   You can try to study the game deeper ... set your PC opponent as white, yourself as black, and try to do to it what he did to you, then observe how it defends and makes that not happen and then attacks you and beats you up and down the board    Doing a lot of that is not productive, but on the occasional game, the PC can enlighten you in short order. 

 

 

 

 

Yeah I have been finding myself in a lot of sharp positions recently. Lots of Kings Gambits, Benko Gambits, and this neat little combo someone got on me below.

 

A game I had recently as black against an Italian

 
I have recently been studying the great attacker Garry Kasparov. Such a interesting style and I think it has helped me out a lot in at understanding attacking players thought process. This game analyzed by GM Yasser Seirawan was such a beautiful game to watch and Yasser was very good at explaining it. I hope to commit this game to memory one day.
 
 

 

macer75

Ask him to be your coach.

BasicChess22
macer75 wrote:

Ask him to be your coach.

Yeah as soon as i find about 10k in my bank account that I dont mind spending ill ask him

Rat1960

#12 Yes that is a great game.
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1067175
GM Seirawan's analysis is great.
As I said in #7 "I would play a game on a board, then play through the game in my head just before going to sleep." and "then playing the variations in your head, trying to see the board."
If you can see that down to a queen if black has ... Qe1+ ; Bf1 QxB#
That whole St Louis set-up looks amazing, it almost makes me wish I was a teenager.