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Improvement game #7 (seeing tactics that aren't there!)

  • #1

    I was missing a game #7 so this one will fit. A loss as white.

    I am usually guilty of missing the most obvious tactics and checkmates but in this game I managed to invent some that weren't there. I got away with the first one but the next two blunders finished me off.

    Any comments that may be of help aside from the obvious mistakes, are appreciated... sad.png

     

  • #2

    Instead of Nd2 then Nf3 did you consider f4? Do you remember the duscussion of the merits of f5 in one of your other games? So it is here with white. Be aggressive and grab the space Dan. Billy Big Bollocks!

  • #3
    Strangemover wrote:

    Instead of Nd2 then Nf3 did you consider f4? Do you remember the duscussion of the merits of f5 in one of your other games? So it is here with white. Be aggressive and grab the space Dan. Billy Big Bollocks!

    And then I would get, don't move the f pawn early in the game, develop your minor pieces haha!

    Seriously though I can see the merits yes, Bc5 would freak me out a bit though once the knight had retreated...

  • #4

    I don't know about this variation of the Ruy Lopez, but after ...a6 normally White retreats his KB to a4, not c4, so as to put it at c2 (after moving c3) it on the great diagonal pointing at h7, and also to cover his e4-pawn.

    You missed a chance at a "queen slap" that would have given you a slight advantage if Black had followed through: 7. Nxc6 dxc6?! 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8.

    Also, challenge open diagonals and don't let Black invade with rooks or queens, so in this case 29. Re4 would have been relatively best (although White is already lost by then, admittedly).

  • #5

    @Sqod: Idk about the whole "queen slap" thing. Often White seems to have a larger advantage if he just avoids those.

  • #6
    chesster3145 wrote:

    @Sqod: Idk about the whole "queen slap" thing. Often White seems to have a larger advantage if he just avoids those.

     

    I studied the statistics of "queen slaps"' at one time, across different openings, which strongly suggested the queen slap is usually the best option. If I get enough objection to my claim and if I have time I'll write up a more formal document that shows this in detail. For right now I am sufficiently convinced, and besides, I like to trade off those dangerous queens anyway. happy.png For the example above, Black isn't forced to be "queen slapped" (...bxc6 avoids that, but then Black gets a messed up pawn structure as a result), so in that specific case you could well be right.

  • #7

    Also, 7... dxc6?? is a lemon due to 8. Bxf7+!

  • #8

    17. Ba7 did not go the way you wanted it to be as the b7 Black bishop also happened to be protected by the e7 queen - horizontal attacks and defences are sometimes hard to see. After 17...Ra8, the bishop would have to retreat, thereby losing tempi - the positioning of the rook on a8 is not really much different from its old positioning at b8 in terms of attacking and maneuvering prospects. Alternatively, is 18. Qd4 is played, 18...Nxf3+ (one move earlier than actually played in the game if the move orders were swapped), White's kingside position would not be very good.

     

    22. Qg4 saves the game but loses the a7 bishop, but at this point there are probably no better ways to salvage the situation.

     

    23...Nxf3+ would be a zwischenzug by Black.

     

    You must have wished that the pawn on f7 had bad legs for one turn on move 25.

     

    Try again in future games. At least you tried to come up with tactics (although the attempts were not very successful). Probably at this point you can envision tactics on the basis that your opponent passes his moves, but this does not actually happen in the game, thus you must consider your opponent's moves while planning tactics of your own.

     

     

  • #9

    Thanks Eric. 

    I looked at the game again and maybe Nxe5 was the move to play at 15 instead of the very passive c5 to avoid being struck by ...Nxf3+ in future?

    The one positive I have taken from this game is that I didn't mess up in the opening and got 14 or 15 moves in without finding myself in trouble.

    I will keep trying, don't worry. Cheers for your input.

     

  • #10

    You were doing ok until you played Ba7, that bishop is in the wrong place and is subject to being won once the bishop exchanges to discover an attack from his queen.

    In addition your kingside is exposed.

    The f4 advance once you have castled is a good move. It attacks the knight that has taken up a good square. It helps open the f-file for your rook.

    The computer thinks 9 Nf5 is the top move. This attacks the pawn on g7 and black castles, then white exchanges the knight for the bishop on e7 and then pushes f2-f4.

     

  • #11
    There was no possible way your tactic would work because you required an attack with the rook to the queen but his knight was depriving you of that option with a simple fork.  There was a way to save your pieces and be down the exchange in the endgame, but it was all losing for you.  here is what I came up with.
     
     

     

  • #12

    Thanks Daybreak, I liked your thinking of improving weaker pieces and solidifying the position rather than going for badly thought-out tactics that didn't exist. Usually I am quite patient but in this game I was rushing to find aggressive moves for some reason. I am not sure black would've played all those responses however I understand what you are getting at overall, targeting weak pieces and moving pieces to better squares slowly. 

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