Instructive loss, would appreciate feedback.


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #41

    manic13

    blueemu wrote:

    Space - Time - Force Analysis (with credit to GM Larry Evans).



    Disadvantage in Force: Try to avoid exchanges unless they bring you an immediate advantage, such as eliminating a very active enemy piece, or gaining several moves. Try to gain a counter-advantage in Time; since of all the elements, Time is the easiest to convert into a win. Try to complicate the game... if your opponent is ahead in force, he will be trying to simplify towards an ending.

    Advantage in Time: Open the position and play for a direct attack. Look for combinations. Superior development... which goes hand-in-hand with an advantage in Time... is increasingly important the more open the position is. Avoid exchanges unless they will increase your advantage or eliminate key defenders.

    Disadvantage in Time: Try to keep the position at least semi-closed. Avoid creating organic weaknesses, which offer your opponent targets for attack. Above all, calculate carefully... your opponent's advantage in Time is the signal for him to attack you. Don't let him see one move further than you. Gradually catch up in development and try to exchange off the most threatening enemy pieces, thus neutralizing your opponent's lead in Time.

    Advantage in Space: Avoid exchanges. Keep your opponent confined, and prevent liberating Pawn levers which would lead to the exchange of pieces. Try to convert your Space advantage into an advantage in Time, which would allow you to shift to a direct attack. Use alternating threats on different sectors of the board, switching the pressure from King's side, to Queen's side, to the center, back to the King's side. With less space to manoever, your opponent might easily fall behind in Time as his pieces start interfering with each other... and that will be your signal to open the position and attack him.

    Disadvantage in Space: Avoid creating weaknesses. Try to exchange off some pieces... three pieces rattling around in a cramped position are much easier to bear than seven pieces squeezed into the same cramped position. Try to defend with economical moves, and avoid losing time. Push Pawns only if it will create favorable conditions for exchanges or for counter-play... in a cramped position, pushing Pawns randomly is little better than suicide.

    Is there a technique for keep tracking time?? And what happens on multiple situations like being ahead in time but back in space or force? Nice post..

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #42

    mauriciolopezsr

    manic13 wrote:
    blueemu wrote:

    Space - Time - Force Analysis (with credit to GM Larry Evans).
    Yes there is a technique, is called a watch!


    Disadvantage in Force: Try to avoid exchanges unless they bring you an immediate advantage, such as eliminating a very active enemy piece, or gaining several moves. Try to gain a counter-advantage in Time; since of all the elements, Time is the easiest to convert into a win. Try to complicate the game... if your opponent is ahead in force, he will be trying to simplify towards an ending.

    Advantage in Time: Open the position and play for a direct attack. Look for combinations. Superior development... which goes hand-in-hand with an advantage in Time... is increasingly important the more open the position is. Avoid exchanges unless they will increase your advantage or eliminate key defenders.

    Disadvantage in Time: Try to keep the position at least semi-closed. Avoid creating organic weaknesses, which offer your opponent targets for attack. Above all, calculate carefully... your opponent's advantage in Time is the signal for him to attack you. Don't let him see one move further than you. Gradually catch up in development and try to exchange off the most threatening enemy pieces, thus neutralizing your opponent's lead in Time.

    Advantage in Space: Avoid exchanges. Keep your opponent confined, and prevent liberating Pawn levers which would lead to the exchange of pieces. Try to convert your Space advantage into an advantage in Time, which would allow you to shift to a direct attack. Use alternating threats on different sectors of the board, switching the pressure from King's side, to Queen's side, to the center, back to the King's side. With less space to manoever, your opponent might easily fall behind in Time as his pieces start interfering with each other... and that will be your signal to open the position and attack him.

    Disadvantage in Space: Avoid creating weaknesses. Try to exchange off some pieces... three pieces rattling around in a cramped position are much easier to bear than seven pieces squeezed into the same cramped position. Try to defend with economical moves, and avoid losing time. Push Pawns only if it will create favorable conditions for exchanges or for counter-play... in a cramped position, pushing Pawns randomly is little better than suicide.

    Is there a technique for keep tracking time?? And what happens on multiple situations like being ahead in time but back in space or force? Nice post..


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