Kings Indian Defense question

RetiOrNot92
New player. I've tried a bunch of different set ups for black against D4/ the field and found the KID to be favorite. Plus there was a helpful series on chess.com lessons on it. But what do if he plays D5 before I play my knight to D5?
Any additional tips for the KID would be appreciated.

RetiOrNot92

I've been really sloppy, so I've decided to post every single game I play on the forums and get feed back. This thread will be all my King's Indian Defense games, no matter how bad/sloppy. I need the feedback.

KID #2

So really sloppy game. I didn't scan the whole board and blundered my knight. It was a dumb move anyways. My endgame was equally bad.

Specific question: Computer engine says G6 was a mistake and I should have played D5. Should I branch out and play D5 (maybe a slav type deal or grunfeld) against kind of dubious openings like that? Or just stick with what I know?

As always any tips/critiques much appreciated.

Shakaali
RetiOrNot92 wrote:

Specific question: Computer engine says G6 was a mistake and I should have played D5. Should I branch out and play D5 (maybe a slav type deal or grunfeld) against kind of dubious openings like that? Or just stick with what I know?

You cannot blindly plays the same moves every time regardless of what your opponent does. This time he did 2. Nc3 before playing c4 so it technically isn't even a King's Indian and you certainly should consider your options at that point. Preventing white's e4 by playing 2... d5 is the most natural move. Having said that, calling 2. g6 a mistake is increadibly harsh. After 2.g6 3. e4 the game just transposes to the Pirc that even some strong GM's like to play against 1. e4.

Some specific things about the opening.  You could perahps consider 5... Nxe4!? intending 6. Nxe4 d5. 6. d5? is a wasted move by white - why close the diagonal for the bishop he just developped to c4 like that. I think 7... b5 would be the correct way to fight for the centre.

8... Nxe4? is a mistake. Probably should play 8... Nxd5 followed by 9... Bxb2 instead. White in turn probably should have done 8. exd5.

 

PawnstormPossie

I was looking at 2nd game and generous advice in post #3 when I noticed (15...Nf3+) you were not calculating. So, I asked myself why. It turns out this was a 10 min blitz game, you didn’t have time if you wanted to calculate.

Noone can help you think in blitz/bullet. You need to slow down and think, follow a process, improve, and then you can speed up. It's not easy to speed up btw.

I'll suggest you play blitz/bullet for fun only. Play daily to think/improve and rapid to test your improvement.

Analyze/annotate your (daily/rapid) games with your thoughts and reasoning before asking for help. 

pfren

You really need to know what King's Indian defence is before asking questions about it. And, even in that case, you have to care about other things first: In our second posted game (which is not a King's Indian defence) what really matters is the after 8...Nxe4+?? you are dropping you Queen for very little.

ArtNJ

Openings are close to irrelevant at your rating.  Studying openings is not useless, but not the best use of your time at your rating.  Its not a problem that you want to study openings of course, it can be fun, but when you select an opening that develops slower and/or counter-attacks the center, it is very difficult for beginners.  You would be far better off concentrating on developing your pieces as quickly as possible and playing a blunder free game.  

IMBacon
RetiOrNot92 wrote:
 
New player. I've tried a bunch of different set ups for black against D4/ the field and found the KID to be favorite. Plus there was a helpful series on chess.com lessons on it. But what do if he plays D5 before I play my knight to D5?
Any additional tips for the KID would be appreciated.

 

First piece of advice.  STOP playing it. 

1.  You're not even playing it.

2.  Openings do not decide your games.

If you want to improve.  Work on the basics like minimizing your blunders, and work on tactics.

I know this isn't as "glamorous as being able to say you play certain openings, but its what you need.

Opening Principles:

  1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5.
  2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key. Centralized piece control more squares.
  3. (King Safety)
  4. Connect your rooks. There should be no pieces between your Rooks.

The objective of development is about improving the value of your pieces by increasing the importance of their roles (Piece Activity).  Well-developed pieces have more fire-power than undeveloped pieces and they do more in helping you gain control.

Now we will look at 5 practical things you can do to help you achieve your development objective.

They are:

  1. Give priority to your least active pieces.
  • Which piece needs to be developed (which piece is the least active)?
  • Where should it go (where can its role be maximized)?
  1. Exchange your least active pieces for your opponent’s active pieces.
  2. Restrict the development of your opponent’s pieces.
  3. Neutralize your opponent’s best piece.
  4. Secure strong squares for your pieces.

 

Don’t help your opponent develop.

There are 2 common mistakes whereby you will simply be helping your opponent to develop:

  1. Making a weak threat that can easily be blocked
  2. Making an exchange that helps your opponent to develop a piece

 

And for each move, you need to go through this checklist.

Pre Move Checklist:

  1. Make sure all your pieces are safe.
  2. Look for forcing move: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board.
  3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board.
  4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece.
  5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"