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My opponent did not accept a draw so he ................

  • #1

     

  • #2

    Too bad for your opponent.  Good game 

  • #3

    he clearly wanted to kamikaze his king rather than face the dishonour of a draw haha good game

  • #4

    The g4 White pawn is a secret agent of Black's pieces in disguise, assisting in the locking up of the White king to the h5 square.

  • #5

    Take a draw, whenever you get it. Lesson learned!

  • #6

    FortunaMajor no it is depend on the position. In that game it is so clear that the repetition may not be avoided.

  • #7

    White's queen is hanging on move 29.

  • #8

    BetweenTheWheels believe me if I tell that I did not see it til you notice that now.

  • #9
    FortunaMajor wrote:

    Take a draw, whenever you get it. Lesson learned!

    umm.... I ARGUE WITH THAT

  • #10
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #11
    AdamCheng8 wrote:
    FortunaMajor wrote:

    Take a draw, whenever you get it. Lesson learned!

    umm.... I ARGUE WITH THAT

    me too

  • #12

    haha you done messed up

     

  • #13

    I remember I asked an opponent for a draw and he said no and the very next move he made a bad blunder and was mated instantly. It was a satisfying win, although he probably didn't feel too good afterwards or perhaps it didn't bother him. I remembered it because usually when you seek a draw it's because the game seems to be considered lost.

  • #14

     

    Fun game. A really nice finish.

    Some comments:

    Your knight sacrifice 25... Nxe5 is beautiful.

    Your comment after white's 27. Bf4 "giving back the piece" is fun, because actually white gave his queen; you could now take it 27... Qxd3.

    Well you didn't take it, but white gave you another chance to take it in move 29 as pointed out by BetweenTheWheels.

    Well, instead you returned the favor with 29...Qxf2+?? and this time the queen was in fact taken although it was the wrong queen from your point of view.

    Your compensation was your active rooks but with proper play from white he should have the upper hand I would say.

    On move 41 white had his big chance to force a winning game even his rook was removed from the first rank. Instead of 41. Qe5+? he should have played 41. Qd4+ followed by 42. Qxf2.

    On move 42 white kind of gave black the initiative in that black could now force a draw after 42. Re6. White would be better off by playing 42. Qe1.

    Then after 43 moves black's draw offer happens but white declines it. Hmm, declining a draw offer when you think you are winning because you are up in material certainly isn't a good idea if you are fatally "down" in position.

    The position after 45. Kxh4??, which was the only way to decline the draw, is either a nice mate in two as happened in the game or a black win of both the white queen and rook, 45... g5+ 46. Qxg5 hxg5+ followed by 47... Rxe6. Wonderful!

  • #15
    BetweenTheWheels wrote:

    White's queen is hanging on move 29.

     

    You mean moves 27 and 29.

  • #16
    BlueKnightShade wrote:

     

    Then after 43 moves black's draw offer happens but white declines it. Hmm, declining a draw offer when you think you are winning because you are up in material certainly isn't a good idea if you are fatally "down" in position.

    The position after 45. Kxh4??, which was the only way to decline the draw, is either a nice mate in two as happened in the game or a black win of both the white queen and rook, 45... g5+ 46. Qxg5 hxg5+ followed by 47... Rxe6. Wonderful!

     

    I am sure that White did not anticipate the checkmate, "There are only two Black rooks and two Black pawns over there, what can Black do?", and thus White declined the draw offer. I am very sure that White was pushing for the "win" with 45. Kxh4?? and had a great shock after being "stabbed from the back" with 46...Rh3#.

  • #17
    "pawn8888 wrote:
     

    I remember I asked an opponent for a draw and he said no and the very next move he made a bad blunder and was mated instantly. It was a satisfying win, although he probably didn't feel too good afterwards or perhaps it didn't bother him. I remembered it because usually when you seek a draw it's because the game seems to be considered lost.

     

    In contrast I had a different, but weird situation, that is, accepting a draw when a mate in one is available. I played my queen back and forth, and my opponent similarly repeated moves for a threefold repetition and I claimed it. Both of us missed that there was a mate in one (I was on the receiving end of the checkmate) with some Qh3# right in front of our faces (a Black bishop from c8 protects the Black queen on h3 while a White queen on f2 and a Black pawn on f5 blocks the escape squares of the White king on g3).

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