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QGD - Why Did I Lose?

  • #81
    Hello
  • #82
    Hi
  • #83

    shut up @Dragondawg999

  • #84

    QGD or e4 are both the wrong ways to learn chess! a traumatic player grown and raised with e4 cant love chess and a QGD inventor can break out any moment!

  • #85
    ciarli wrote:

    QGD or e4 are both the wrong ways to learn chess! a traumatic player grown and raised with e4 cant love chess and a QGD inventor can break out any moment!

    That makes no sense. Try again.

  • #86
    notmtwain wrote:
    ciarli wrote:

    QGD or e4 are both the wrong ways to learn chess! a traumatic player grown and raised with e4 cant love chess and a QGD inventor can break out any moment!

    That makes no sense. Try again.>>

    He means in spots.

     

  • #87

    14...Nxc3. The exchange is simply better for White. The other problem is that there's no way to develop the pieces you do have. Black's light-squared bishop is trapped behind pawns and there seems to be no way to develop the rooks. So in retrospect, it's like White is playing with Q+N+B v Q because the other pieces Black has can't actually do anything.

     

    8...Nc6 is also a problem but not losing. In queen's pawn openings you usually don't want to develop your knight in front of the c-pawn. In this pawn structure with a pawn on d4 vs a pawn on e6, White's d-pawn gives him a space advantage. This means that White's pieces have a lot of room to maneuver while Black's position is cramped. You can see this problem vividly in the position after 14...Nxc3 as it's very difficult to find squares for Black's pieces. So Black typically tries to attack this d-pawn and remove it from the board in favorable circumstances.

     

    If the d-pawn is removed then Black gets more space for his pieces and can move around easier. Black usually attacks the pawn by playing the move ...c5 at some point. But with the knight developed to c6 this is no longer possible. An alternative way of attacking the d-pawn is to play the move ...e5 but this move tends to be much more difficult. With the knight on c6 you are probably committed to the e5 break but it's not very realistic here. If Black does not play the e5 or c5 break he will simply be cramped and without some other way to find counterplay he will simply be worse. And this is why it was difficult to find moves in your game. You had to play moves like ...g5 because it was hard to find active play otherwise.

     

    With this in mind we can now see that Black should prefer moves like 8...c5 or 8...Nbd7 preparing the move 9...c5. These will lead to more playable positions for Black. Black could try something like 8...Nc6 9.Nf3 Na5 10.Bd3 b6 here which uses the ...c5 break and prepares to develop the light-squared bishop to b7. This could be risky though because the knight on a5 could signal White to go for an attack and sac a piece with the idea that the sacked piece is more effective than anything the knight on a5 could ever do. But if you didn't know about the important pawn breaks in the game then you may not have found this plan anyway so there's not much to be done about it. But now you know and this should help you in your games.

  • #88
    DaniSpringer wrote:

    Thank you all very much.

    It seems this opening is way too advanced for me for now.

     

    What can I do to refute it? Carocan? King's Indian? Is there a way to avoid the QGA/QGD? Or is the QGD the refutation of the QGA?

     

    For example, if I don't want white to play the Ruy Lopez, I can play 2...d5, and go into the Scandinavian (which I don't yet know well, but that's a separate story ).

     

    So, to avoid 1...d4, 3...c4, what can I play? (or to make those two moves not the best choices for white)

    I think I saw a reply that mentioned double D pawn openings meaning 1d4 ...d5 like the game you played and next move was 2. c4 ...Nf6 which is some kind of Q G D. When white played c4, the gambit pawn, he is offering a pawn in exchange for quick development, he hopes; since you didn't take the pawn immediately, it could play out like a Q G D.In the previous post by varelse1, He shows the move for Classical game. You can also protect the center with the c pawn ...c6, which advances the pawn before moving the Knight who has a reserved spot on d2, That has a  certain name too but can't remember

     

    @Terry1948 I agree 100%! I'm learning about ideas I never knew even existed (which, considering I'm < 1400, is not such a surprise, but still )

     

  • #89

    You might want to watch a few videos about Q G D on You tube; there's a bunch

  • #90

    you lost because you couldnt 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    SCUFFLE

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