My most satisfying blitz game

kaukasar

I rarely play blitz since i am not good at short time controls, but in this game everything went so smooth - 98.6 accuracy. happy.png I am using this variation of english opening quite frequently, i feel it gives good harmony to my development, piece placement and pawn break opportunities. 

scrabblechecs

Beautiful game !

eric0022

i presume that Black made the assumption that the Black knight was already defended on move 7 and therefore played 7. Qf6 .

NotSoProChessLeaxgue

Well done buddy ^_^. Though, try not to pay too much attention on the accuracy the engine gives you. Just try to play good, logical, safe moves that help your position, and when you see tactics, take advantage of them. Also, the English is really good for piece harmony. 

ghost_of_pushwood

Yeah, accuracy scores are pretty silly.  They're generally more a reflection of your opponent's bad play.

ghost_of_pushwood
eric0022 wrote:

i presume that Black made the assumption that the Black knight was already defended on move 7 and therefore played 7. Qf6 .

Yes, that did seem a bit inaccurate. happy.png

kaukasar

Thanks! happy.png I know my opponent played badly, 2 serious blunders in a quick succession. It is much harder to get a good piece harmony when facing a strong opponent. 

Do you know if the english variation i am playing has any name? I haven't studied any theory, i just started develop my pieces this way because it felt natural. Key moves are playing e3 and Ne2 instead of Nf3 (i dont want to block my light square bishop). And i usually fianchetto my dark square bishop as well, depending on my opponents play.

The only drawback that i have noticed is that it takes a while to get this setup. There are faster (and more aggressive) ways to develop..

saiea
kaukasar wrote:

Thanks!  I know my opponent played badly, 2 serious blunders in a quick succession. It is much harder to get a good piece harmony when facing a strong opponent. 

Do you know if the english variation i am playing has any name? I haven't studied any theory, i just started develop my pieces this way because it felt natural. Key moves are playing e3 and Ne2 instead of Nf3 (i dont want to block my light square bishop). And i usually fianchetto my dark square bishop as well, depending on my opponents play.

The only drawback that i have noticed is that it takes a while to get this setup. There are faster (and more aggressive) ways to develop..

Yes. it does. it's called English Bremen system

ghost_of_pushwood

Glad somebody knew it. happy.png

ChessFreak2020

Despite your game being almost 100% accurate, you have to take into consideration that your opponent played very badly. The scale generally takes your opponents bad play and then sets that as a Standard for yours. If your opponent had played very well your accuracy wouldn't have been as good.

MaxLange-simulator

Black was like "Here bro. Take my pieces. They are all undefended!!"  

hikarunaku
ChessFreak2020 wrote:

The scale generally takes your opponents bad play and then sets that as a Standard for yours. If your opponent had played very well your accuracy wouldn't have been as good.

You sure that's how it works? 

ghost_of_pushwood

probably happy.png

hikarunaku

I know it's easy to get a high accuracy against bad play but that's not because the scale sets your standards according to your opponent's play but because it's easy find the best moves in simple positions. 

ghost_of_pushwood

lol  I believe that's one of those tomato/tomahto things...

Optimissed

You mean, tomayto tomato?

ghost_of_pushwood

No, that's what you mean.