870 rated player looking to improve.

KeSetoKaiba
Pawned064 wrote:
Dsmith42 wrote:

At your level, you need to learn the basics first.  Whenever a novice comes into my local club, I first play them to gauge their level, and if they are short of 1000 or so, I being with:

1) The basic checkmates - how to checkmate with K&Q, K&R, the back rank mates, and the queen attack from the front of a castled king.

2) King & pawn v. king, which positions are won, which ones are drawn, and how to win/draw as applicable.

3) Basic tactics - forks, pins, skewers, discovered attacks/checks, and the zwischwenzug.

4) The opening - and here I only mention development of the minor pieces and control of the center - and I make sure introduce both the Classical and Hypermodern styles here.

The zwischwenzug (in-between move) is the main difference between someone at the 1000-1200 level and those at the 1600-1800 level.  Counter-punches are a lot more effective than strictly defensive moves.  You must open your mind to a wider range of moves, otherwise you'll simply be caught unaware when your opponent plays them.

I know about all of this.

Some of these "fundamental" topics even GMs are working on; even they don't know "all of this." However, what you probably intend to say is "I think I got the basics on this and want to move onto something else that will improve my chess" and to that I recommend to begin looking at more middlegame motifs. By 1500-1600ish I would imagine that the player has already started to investigate various pawn structures and thematic motifs outside of the openings they typically employ (as some motifs are transferable across openings). At over 1300 chess.com rating (where you are roughly at already), I think this would be a good direction to start going into. Study things (even if only loosely "study") like pawn breaks, when doubled pawns can actually serve as a strength (not only a potential weakness!) and common setups of pawns (like the Benoni pawn structure with the d6 "backwards pawn" or the King's Indian Defense ...f5 ideas). 

If you have gotten the basics above down solidly for your level, then I'd start investigating these middlegame themes. happy.png

Pawned064
Andrs64 wrote:

Buenas, saben que ataque seria el mejor con la siciliana?

I don't understand.

Pawned064
Pawned064 wrote:
Andrs64 wrote:

Buenas, saben que ataque seria el mejor con la siciliana?

I don't understand.

I think it meant-

Hi, do you know which attack would be the best with the Sicilian?

I don't know.

Its a defense right?

Pawned064
KeSetoKaiba wrote:
Pawned064 wrote:
Dsmith42 wrote:

At your level, you need to learn the basics first.  Whenever a novice comes into my local club, I first play them to gauge their level, and if they are short of 1000 or so, I being with:

1) The basic checkmates - how to checkmate with K&Q, K&R, the back rank mates, and the queen attack from the front of a castled king.

2) King & pawn v. king, which positions are won, which ones are drawn, and how to win/draw as applicable.

3) Basic tactics - forks, pins, skewers, discovered attacks/checks, and the zwischwenzug.

4) The opening - and here I only mention development of the minor pieces and control of the center - and I make sure introduce both the Classical and Hypermodern styles here.

The zwischwenzug (in-between move) is the main difference between someone at the 1000-1200 level and those at the 1600-1800 level.  Counter-punches are a lot more effective than strictly defensive moves.  You must open your mind to a wider range of moves, otherwise you'll simply be caught unaware when your opponent plays them.

I know about all of this.

Some of these "fundamental" topics even GMs are working on; even they don't know "all of this." However, what you probably intend to say is "I think I got the basics on this and want to move onto something else that will improve my chess" and to that I recommend to begin looking at more middlegame motifs. By 1500-1600ish I would imagine that the player has already started to investigate various pawn structures and thematic motifs outside of the openings they typically employ (as some motifs are transferable across openings). At over 1300 chess.com rating (where you are roughly at already), I think this would be a good direction to start going into. Study things (even if only loosely "study") like pawn breaks, when doubled pawns can actually serve as a strength (not only a potential weakness!) and common setups of pawns (like the Benoni pawn structure with the d6 "backwards pawn" or the King's Indian Defense ...f5 ideas). 

If you have gotten the basics above down solidly for your level, then I'd start investigating these middlegame themes.

thx