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A perfect schedule for vacation?

  • #1

    First of all sorry for my bad english.

    Well, I'm going to spend some time out of the university this summer for 3 months and I'm trying to build a schedule to learn more about chess, about everything of the game (openings, endgames, strategy, etc). The problem is that I can't find the best way to split my time between all of the subjects. At first I'm planing 8 hours a day for chess (yeah, I'm trying to take my chess to another level in my life) and the rest to whatever I want, so, assuming I'm sticking with 8 hours a day for 3 months, how should I split this time? Should I focus more on specific things, like endgame, middlegame, or things like strategy, plans and tactics? Can you guys share with me your thoughts about it? I apreciate every opinion and sujestions wink.png

  • #2

    8 hours a day for 3 months? My gosh! I suggest that such a level of study is unhealthy 😀 But anyway, I would pick 2 openings each for white and black, 1 e4, 1 d4, study games by strong players with these openings, play games using these openings. Endgame drills vs a strong engine, Rook and pawn stuff, positions where you have 1 or 2 extra pawns etc etc and many many tactics puzzles. And if you feel like its getting too much, take a break, go for coffee with friends, whatever. Dont do it if it becomes a chore and is not fun for you!

  • #3
    Strangemover escreveu:

    8 hours a day for 3 months? My gosh! I suggest that such a level of study is unhealthy 😀 But anyway, I would pick 2 openings each for white and black, 1 e4, 1 d4, study games by strong players with these openings, play games using these openings. Endgame drills vs a strong engine, Rook and pawn stuff, positions where you have 1 or 2 extra pawns etc etc and many many tactics puzzles. And if you feel like its getting too much, take a break, go for coffee with friends, whatever. Dont do it if it becomes a chore and is not fun for you!

    Thanks for the thoughts, I already have an "repertoire" but the openings that I like to play have a lot of theory ^^. And if you put like that "8 hours of study", for me is not like 8 hours = 8 hours of no fun, I actually like to study chess wink.png

  • #4

    My suggestion is to not study chess for 8 hours per day. 

  • #5
    tooWEAKtooSL0W wrote:

    My suggestion is to not study chess for 8 hours per day. 

    I go with that!!
    But, I think you should ask a coach for that.

  • #6

    Those who study the brain have revealed that you can only learn so much at a time with any efficiency due to plain old fatigue.....so 2-3 hours per day (and even that should be split up into 2-4 sessions per day at different times) for a year is much, much better. maybe start in the summer and carry it through...to ???

  • #7
    You’ll burn out.
  • #8

    8 hours is that long? I mean, people work for more than 8 hours a day :/ I think it wouldn't be a problem.

  • #9

    8 hours is not bad.  I used to play/study for 6 hours or so a day back in highschool.  My recommendation is to ask yourself where your weaknesses are.  The biggest weakness should be your main focus.  I'd allocate 4 of those hours to that.  Then I'd do 2 hours to your next biggest weakness and then 1 hour to the third, followed by a final hour either playing games online or looking over grandmaster games.  So, if it were me doing this (I wish I could), I'd do 4 hours of opening theory, 2 hours of endgame theory, 1 hour of tactics, and an hour looking at GM games.  But everybody's different.  

  • #10

    Vacation? Why don't you go somewhere exotic like a beach on the coast of Brazil? Oh wait a minute.

  • #11

    pick up a good book and read it when you're done read another one

  • #12

    pick up a good book and read it when you're done read another one

  • #13

    Trying to study so many hours is certainly possible, but may require splitting up the kind of studying you do. If, for example, you work on a book, you will get tired before the 8 hours are up. So, perhaps start with some tactics puzzles for an hour, then spend time with the book or your main study. You should also add playing games into your schedule so you can try and put into practice the ideas you have learnt.

     

    I've heard one suggestion that says learn an opening, and then go play like 20 Blitz games when you only use that opening. It doesn't matter if you win/lose, it is about becoming familiar with the opening and possible variations in a relatively quick time. 

     

    At the end of the day, when you're feeling tired, you can switch your training over to something easier to follow such as a chess lecture on YouTube you can watch, or some chess training DVDs, etc. 

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