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Advice for aspiring chess improvers

  • #41
    Milliern wrote:
    logozar wrote:

    The books from the "Chess Classics" series (Quality chess)

    How many of these have you gone through?  Thoughts on any particular texts, besides My System. 

    I've studied about 40% of My System, I'm likely to come back to it at some point.

    I've studied 2-3 chapters of Soviet middlegame technique and intend on studying it after I finish New York 1924 (which I'm about halfway through).

    I own all of the "Chess Classics" series by quality chess but haven't studied most of them yet.

    Opinions on them?

    Chess Praxis is a game collection. It's likely useful but can take some work to get through. I'd say the target audience is probably 1800 to 2200.

    Soviet Middlegame Technique is absolutely phenomenal. It's probably one of the best chess books ever written on the middlegame. I made progress simply studying 2-3 chapters of it. I think players up to 2400 FIDE (or possibly even higher) can learn from this book.

    Soviet Chess Primer is excellent. It is entertaining and instructive. I'd say the target audience is anywhere between 0 and 2000 USCF. Dvoretsky claimed he read it when he was class (C/D/E - somewhere around 1200-1500 don't remember which) over a summer and then had a series of wins which allowed him to break 2000.

    Soviet chess strategy is okay, it's sort of a series of articles.

    Questions of modern chess theory is rather thin, but from a glance looks extremely instructive. Fischer referenced it in his 'My 60 memorable games'

  • #42
    dfgh123 wrote:

    memorize a repertoire is kinda trolly

    "... Overall, I would advise most players to stick to a fairly limited range of openings, and not to worry about learning too much by heart. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)
    "... the average player only needs to know a limited amount about the openings he plays. Providing he understands the main aims of the opening, a few typical plans and a handful of basic variations, that is enough. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)

  • #43
    logozar wrote:

    Soviet Middlegame Technique is absolutely phenomenal. It's probably one of the best chess books ever written on the middlegame. I made progress simply studying 2-3 chapters of it. I think players up to 2400 FIDE (or possibly even higher) can learn from this book.

    Wow, what a review, and I've actually never heard of this book. I'll seriously consider getting it, thanks.

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  • #48
    logozar wrote:

    ... Soviet chess strategy ...

    http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/ebooks/SovietChessStrategyexcerpt.pdf

  • #49
    logozar wrote:

    ... Questions of modern chess theory ...

    http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/ebooks/QuestionsofModernChessTheory-Exceprt.pdf

  • #50
    kindaspongey wrote:
    dfgh123 wrote:

    memorize a repertoire is kinda trolly

    "...most players..."
    "... the average player..."

    Ambitious players who want to become expert or master might have to do more than that. 

    I do agree with you that in most cases for U2000 players plans and ideas are more important than memorizing deep variations in the opening.

  • #51
    bb_gum234 wrote:
    logozar wrote:

    Soviet Middlegame Technique is absolutely phenomenal. It's probably one of the best chess books ever written on the middlegame. I made progress simply studying 2-3 chapters of it. I think players up to 2400 FIDE (or possibly even higher) can learn from this book.

    Wow, what a review, and I've actually never heard of this book. I'll seriously consider getting it, thanks.

    I haven't seen you in Boston, or have I?  Did you end up moving?

  • #52
    Milliern wrote:
    bb_gum234 wrote:
    logozar wrote:

    Soviet Middlegame Technique is absolutely phenomenal. It's probably one of the best chess books ever written on the middlegame. I made progress simply studying 2-3 chapters of it. I think players up to 2400 FIDE (or possibly even higher) can learn from this book.

    Wow, what a review, and I've actually never heard of this book. I'll seriously consider getting it, thanks.

    I haven't seen you in Boston, or have I?  Did you end up moving?

    Oh, yeah, I said hi at a BCF event a few months ago. IIRC you had to leave a round early but you'd already tied or won your section, something like that, and I said congrats happy.png

  • #53

    the human subconscious photographs the variations we study and comprhend.. I enjoyed "LASKERS CHESSMAGAZINE VOLUME 2" because the material is simple to comprhend and memorize and yet its a challenge to complete the entire magazine..Yell=Smile For a magazinebook printed in 1905 its far ahead of its time... I recommend ANY serious chessplayer take alook and enjoy the articles, games ,puzzles, opening theroy, endgames, and gambits in this masterpiece..Cool

      not an easyread

  • #54

    Can't you just shut up. You stupid fellow!

  • #55

    @AviaSharma

    Who are you talking to?

  • #56
    AviaSharma wrote:

    Can't you just shut up. You stupid fellow!

    you 600-700 elo rating.    Mabye in about 10 years of study,  youll be able to read and comprhend books such as "SOVIET MIDDLEGAmE TECHNIQUE" and "LASKERS CHESSMAGAZINE VOLUME 2" 

      I recommend you read "The kids book of chess" by Harvey Kidder 

      "POWERCHESS FOR KIDS VOLUMES 1 and 2 might be too advanced for your almost 400 tacticsrating.

     I apologize if my book recommendation offends people.

  • #57

    Badi chaud khaa rahaa Hai na? 2 saal de mujhe. Agar mai GM nahi bani naa, to mera naam badal diyo

  • #58

    Kuch bhi bolta rehta hai

  • #59

    Mota

  • #60

    Bol ab to kuch

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