Are there any specific requirements for becoming a NM?

Elubas

I've always heard about GM norms, and IM norms, to earn those respective titles, but I've never heard anything on how one would become a national master. Do you have to get "NM" norms for that?

Tricklev

Neither FM, CM or NM requires any norms besides hitting the required rating.

Elubas

Hmm. But I recall reading a guy's blog today who was commenting on how someone in the tournament he was playing in (might have even been the poster) "earned a CM norm."

shoop2

CM is the USCF norms-based title for Expert.  It's a rating-based title for FIDE.

Elubas

What about a NM?

Conflagration_Planet

Don't you just need a USCF rating of 2200 for NM?

Elubas

NM is a life title right? If it is, then you have to be "appointed" a NM, so I thought maybe you have to do something special :)

waffllemaster

Almost certain that in the US anyway you will lose your NM distinction if your rating falls below 2200.  Someone let me know if this is not true.

Conflagration_Planet
waffllemaster wrote:

Almost certain that in the US anyway you will lose your NM distinction if your rating falls below 2200.  Someone let me know if this is not true.


 That's not true. It's a life title.

Conflagration_Planet
akintews wrote:

Seems like AndyClifton has disowned his...


 He just doesn't show it on this site.

Elubas
waffllemaster wrote:

Almost certain that in the US anyway you will lose your NM distinction if your rating falls below 2200.  Someone let me know if this is not true.


Well, I know that you're not in the master class anymore if you get out of 2200, just as you're no longer an expert if you're below 2000, but is that what NM means? I thought that when you're just 2200, you're an unofficial master. Just "Master" is a class, or rating group, but I thought "NM" was a life title, in the same vein as IM and GM.

I recall seeing NM Tonydal put up his rating here as one in the 2100s.

Conflagration_Planet
Elubas wrote:
waffllemaster wrote:

Almost certain that in the US anyway you will lose your NM distinction if your rating falls below 2200.  Someone let me know if this is not true.


Well, I know that you're not in the master class anymore if you get out of 2200, just as you're no longer an expert if you're below 2000, but is that what NM means? I thought that when you're just 2200, you're an unofficial master. Just "Master" is a class, or rating group, but I thought "NM" was a life title, in the same vein as IM and GM.

I recall seeing NM Tonydal put up his rating here as one in the 2100s.


 Didn't you read my post where I said it is a life title? It is.

Elubas
woodshover wrote:
Elubas wrote:
waffllemaster wrote:

Almost certain that in the US anyway you will lose your NM distinction if your rating falls below 2200.  Someone let me know if this is not true.


Well, I know that you're not in the master class anymore if you get out of 2200, just as you're no longer an expert if you're below 2000, but is that what NM means? I thought that when you're just 2200, you're an unofficial master. Just "Master" is a class, or rating group, but I thought "NM" was a life title, in the same vein as IM and GM.

I recall seeing NM Tonydal put up his rating here as one in the 2100s.


 Didn't you read my post where I said it is a life title? It is.


So they just award it to you for life if you become 2200? Just want to know how certain you are of this since there seems to be mixed opinions.

Conflagration_Planet

100% certain. I believe 2000 USCF makes you an expert. However, expert is not a life title.

goldendog

"Life Master is a chess title awarded by the United States Chess Federation (USCF). To be awarded this title, one must hold a master's rating of over 2200 for at least 300 USCF-rated tournament chess games.

During the 1990s, the USCF also awarded a "Life Master" title on the basis of a different and more complex system that was similar to the FIDE 'norm system' of awarding titles. This method of attaining Life Master became officially recognized by the USCF on January 1, 1996. The "class norm" system was later discontinued, and players who had or were subsequently granted the title on the 300-game basis were renamed "Original Life Masters." In practice, the distinction is rarely made.

As the name of this title implies, this title is held for life, regardless of any subsequent decrease in rating. Thus it is possible to have a player with a USCF rating of 2100 (or below) who is a Life Master. While this is uncommon for 'Original Life Masters' (since such a rating floor can only be dropped by the USCF itself), it is relatively common for Life Masters who earned their title via the now-defunct norm system, since the requirements for that title did NOT require a rating of over 2200. This has led to some holders of the USCF Life Master title having never obtained ratings above 2200."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Master

Conflagration_Planet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_master

Conflagration_Planet

I see I was beaten to the punch.

AnthonyCG

There is also a caffeine consumption requirement.

Conflagration_Planet
woodshover wrote:

I see I was beaten to the punch.


 Actually, you should read my reference. It tells more about it.

goldendog

You tell 'em woodie.