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Books for free in Chessable: some suggestions

  • #1

    If you know me, you know already that I am a big fun of the website Chessable. I do a lot of advertisement for it here, as the more players are studying there, the better the website will get (it is already great). 

    What is so special in this website? You learn the things by spaced repetition. If you are like me you know that it is difficult to keep in memory things that you just read once or twice. In  Chessable you have to repeat regularly, the often you blunder a position, the often you will review the position. Things that you memorised well you will repeat less often. That's it. 

    You have books there on openings (the most books) and endgames. The website has still to build up material on tactics and strategy. 

    For the openings there are books from different quality. I like very much the books by GM Colovic, a complete repertoire against everything but 1.e4. The repertoire is based on QGD, and it is from exceptional quality, as far as I see. Cool is that you can ask the authors, and often they will answer you rather quick. Colovic often answer my stupid questions on the same day, often in the same hour.

    Another book I like very much is the Scandinavian by  John Bartholomew. He is a strong IM, close to GM. Some of you perhaps know him from his terrific chess videos in YouTube. The book is based on Queen going back to d8. It is funny that I almost thought this move is just rubbish, played by people who do not understand theory. But there are several strong players playing it. Strongly recommended if you want to have a solid position, often giving the opponent the bishop pair and more space, but it is funny to see how white have huge problems to make something out of it.

     

    The endgame books are few, but highly helpful. You can get a book for free on basic stuff, ideal for people who make the first steps in endgames; it is called Basic Endgames.

    For experts until GM level you have the famous book "100 Endgames You Must Know". If you go through this stuff you will crash everybody in the endgame (well, if you missed up in the opening / middlegame you can use the book to try to get a draw).

    Here the link to the website. Good luck and see you there.

    https://www.chessable.com/

     

  • #2

    Thanks for the suggestion Torri!

  • #3
    In before the lock
  • #4

    Pikelemi, am I not allowed to write about other websites? I don't know exactly the rules, so...

  • #5

    You can now adjust the amount of time you can spend on figuring out the next move in a book.

  • #6
    torrubirubi wrote:

    Pikelemi, am I not allowed to write about other websites? I don't know exactly the rules, so...

    You are allowed to discuss them.  You are not allowed to compare them to chess.com

  • #7

    I am not comparing, so...

    I like both websites. Chessable is more to learn, hard work. Here is more for fun.

  • #8

     I am not sure DeLaVilla's book is as good as you think.

    A friend showed me a position from the book(page 160  if I remember correctly)

    According to ce La Villa 1...Rg1+ 2.Kf6 Rh1 and white has nothing better than play 3.Kg5 to protect the pawn and Black alternates checks and threats on h-pawn.

        The problem is that 1...Rg1+ 2.Kf6 Rh1 3.h5! seems to win since 3...Rxh5 loses to 4.Kg6(threatening the rook and checkmate).

        And this is not the only one.

  • #9

    Ops, thank you very much, I will check this in my book.

  • #10

    Actually this is the position 11.4 from this book. As  you see, both pawns have reached the 6th rank. The variation is okay. The white king will go to e8, but avoiding d7:

    1... ♖g1+
    2.
    ♔f5
    ♖f1+
    3.
    ♔e6 
    3... ♖e1+
    4.
    ♔d6
    4.Kd7? Kf7 allows Black to hold.
    4... ♖d1+
    5.
    ♔e7
    ♖e1+
    6.
    ♔d8
    ♖d1+
    7.
    ♔e8
    ♖e1+
    8.
    ♖e7
    ♖f1
    9.
    f7+
    ♔h8
    10.
    ♖e6 +-
    Followed by f7-f8.
  • #11

    I was gonna say, cos 3.Rb8# would save White a lot of time!

  • #12
    JamesColeman wrote:

    I was gonna say, cos 3.Rb8# would save White a lot of time!

    The king is on g8 , I place it wrong.

  • #13
    torrubirubi wrote:

    Actually this is the position 11.4 from this book. As  you see, both pawns have reached the 6th rank. The variation is okay. The white king will go to e8, but avoiding d7:

    1... ♖g1+
    2.
    ♔f5
    ♖f1+
    3.
    ♔e6 
    3... ♖e1+
    4.
    ♔d6
    4.Kd7? Kf7 allows Black to hold.
    4... ♖d1+
    5.
    ♔e7
    ♖e1+
    6.
    ♔d8
    ♖d1+
    7.
    ♔e8
    ♖e1+
    8.
    ♖e7
    ♖f1
    9.
    f7+
    ♔h8
    10.
    ♖e6 +-
    Followed by f7-f8.

     I think he has one more with the pawns on 4th rank.

  • #14
    DeirdreSkye wrote:

     I am not sure DeLaVilla's book is as good as you think.

    A friend showed me a position from the book(page 160  if I remember correctly)

     

    According to ce La Villa 1...Rg1+ 2.Kf6 Rh1 and white has nothing better than play 3.Kg5 to protect the pawn and Black alternates checks and threats on h-pawn.

        The problem is that 1...Rg1+ 2.Kf6 Rh1 3.h5! seems to win since 3...Rxh5 loses to 4.Kg6(threatening the rook and checkmate).

        And this is not the only one.

    You are right, it is example 9. Interesting is that the diagram is wrong, it is not coherent with the text (he says that 2.Rh1 does not work with the h-pawn on the 4th or 5th rank, because White can play 3.f5. He wrote this and got confused, putting the pawns on the 4th rank, but they should be on the on the third rank. In Chessable people saw this already and everybody can see a comment on it.   I did not know it because I did not work with this chapter yet.

    Otherwise the books is good. Please let me know if you know something else wrong in this book. I will try to contact the author, so he can correct these things in the next edition.

  • #15

    Why would it be drawn with the pawns on the third rank, though?

  • #16

    I have to check this.  I have a digital book in Kindle, and there in some diagrams the pawns are half in a square, half in another! But I will go to sleep and check this tomorrow.

  • #17

    To be honest I don't know too much about this ending but I'm pretty sure with the K cut off on the back rank it's nearly always lost. For example WR:b7 WK:g2 white pawns at f2 and h2, BK g8 BR a1 is a win for white regardless who moves. Nigel Short showed me how to try and hold this but I've forgotten some of the details.

  • #18
    What Pikelemi said in the original post #3.
    Also a member of ‘able. Surprised this site doesn’t have that training feature here, even if it is just rote memorization drills.
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