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chess and religion

llama47
btickler wrote:
llama47 wrote:

Eh, not really what I meant, but I guess those are types like I asked.

I was thinking along the lines of a creator god isn't necessarily omnipotent, and e.g. omniscience, omnipresence, benevolence, etc. All these attributes are independent of each other.

If a person has never encountered another language, they may make the mistake of believing all foreign languages amount to ciphers where one word or letter is simply replaced with another. So too a person who has never thought about religion may assume all gods are the same as their god, just dressed in different robes.

I was just kidding.  Reading some Joseph Campbell will shed some light on similarities between mythologies.

Sure, humans are humans no matter the age, and our literature has archetypes. I certainly didn't mean to imply all religions are completely different. Mostly I like to make these distinctions because once a believer realizes they're talking about a very specific God, they realize they need more evidence than "how do you explain rainbows?"

In other words, there are a thousand kinds of creator Gods that aren't your God.

btickler
llama47 wrote:

Sure, humans are humans no matter the age, and our literature has archetypes. I certainly didn't mean to imply all religions are completely different. Mostly I like to make these distinctions because once a believer realizes they're talking about a very specific God, they realize they need more evidence than "how do you explain rainbows?"

In other words, there are a thousand kinds of creator Gods that aren't your God.

Easier when they are all made up happy.png.

llama47
btickler wrote:
llama47 wrote:

Sure, humans are humans no matter the age, and our literature has archetypes. I certainly didn't mean to imply all religions are completely different. Mostly I like to make these distinctions because once a believer realizes they're talking about a very specific God, they realize they need more evidence than "how do you explain rainbows?"

In other words, there are a thousand kinds of creator Gods that aren't your God.

Easier when they are all made up .

I don't know what you mean.

btickler
llama47 wrote:

I don't know what you mean.

The thousands of Gods are easier to come up with.

llama47

Yes, but I can imagine a few reasonable arguments that take that to mean opposing things.

Sorry, I'm not a very good conversationalist...

blitz2009
Hi
llama47
blitz2009 wrote:
Hi

Hello, hi

Original Bad Boy on the case, cover your face . . 

jpaul_lyons

Come on now! I think we know all gods are but various forms of Caissa.

Troitzky sets you a problem to study! ~ find the key and be enlightened!

 

jpaul_lyons
power_9_the_people wrote:

There is only one little problem  with Hinduism,  since in this religion all are going to be liberated someday. In chess, oftentimes, there are winners and  losers. Knowing, on top of that, that Hinduism is the mother  of all religions... Not sure 😕 but it could be that Hinduism will always resist the temptation to imitate chess.

https://www.hinduismtoday.com/magazine/jan-feb-mar-2020/insight-hinduism-the-greatest-religion-in-the-world/

Some have observed that Hinduism seems to have brought religion into a kind of first-person oriented science.  There is something to this, as at the frontiers of cognitive science there has been discussion of such first person techniques (See Francisco Varela ).  The major literature of Eastern religions as whole is very interesting, especially from a psychological point of view.  I know that some very bright people including Emerson, Schopenhauer, Heidegger, and others have poured over this religious literature for insights, and there is nothing quite like it in the West.  Is it the best stuff?  That's maybe a matter of opinion. . . or a matter of pragmatism.  Swami Vivekananda has pointed out that there as many paths as there are temperaments, ranging from the emotional/devotional to the intellectual - all perhaps leading to the same summum bonum.  But again, I like Rajneesh! 

But he doesn't talk like a guy who actually believes in the hellfire of Dante's inferno! Vivekananda once said, "Fearless! Knowledge of the Self - you shall descend to the 7th hell unscathed!" ~ or something like that.  Very empowering, like when Christians reflect on the notion of Christ descending to hell with a mighty raucous, just after he left his body, to liberate some folks. In this way the Vedanta and Yoga philosophy is in a way empowering like the Hermetic philosophy, which also was combined with Christianity in the early days, declaring the brotherhood of mankind in Divinity; and "see the Universe as the body of God"; .  That philosophy says man is not a worm, not a miserable sinner.. but Divine.  One is encouraged to live up to this notion, however much it sounds like hyperbole! It is better for some people to be like Don Quixote than wan, sickly, and wretched.    The following excerpt from the Asclepius has a music that is similar to certain moments in the Hindu religious discourse:

“If then you do not make yourself equal to God, you cannot apprehend God; for like is known by like.
Leap clear of all that is corporeal, and make yourself grown to a like expanse with that greatness which is beyond all measure; rise above all time and become eternal; then you will apprehend God. Think that for you too nothing is impossible; deem that you too are immortal, and that you are able to grasp all things in your thought, to know every craft and science; find your home in the haunts of every living creature; make yourself higher than all heights and lower than all depths; bring together in yourself all opposites of quality, heat and cold, dryness and fluidity; think that you are everywhere at once, on land, at sea, in heaven; think that you are not yet begotten, that you are in the womb, that you are young, that you are old, that you have died, that you are in the world beyond the grave; grasp in your thought all of this at once, all times and places, all substances and qualities and magnitudes together; then you can apprehend God.

But if you shut up your soul in your body, and abase yourself, and say “I know nothing, I can do nothing; I am afraid of earth and sea, I cannot mount to heaven; I know not what I was, nor what I shall be,” then what have you to do with God?”
― Hermes Trismegistus, Hermetica: The Greek Corpus Hermeticum and the Latin Asclepius

Now clearly this "make yourself equal to God" is nearing blasphemy in Christianity, and yet Christ says something similar in "what I do (and greater, even), ye shall also do" - and he is one with the Father, in our Catholic teaching.

The variety ways is given by Plato as the Good, the True, and the Beautiful.  And therefore Chess!

jpaul_lyons

Apparently some Buddhists know that chess is a path to liberation:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/04/24/planet-kirsan