Computer Chess


  • 5 months ago · Quote · #1

    KevA93

    In your opinion what are the main advantages and disadvantages of playing against a computer compared to a human?

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #2

    thechosen0ne

    Totally different! Even Magnus said he dislikes playing against the computer.

    It's more difficult to learn from computer moves since they come by brute force calculation that no human can match, and less by principles, ideas, strategies, and plans.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #3

    PositionalChessMC

    Computer moves dont come from brute force, Its impossible to brute force a middle game, becuase of the number of possibilities. Even after so much development table base has been developed only for 7 pieces.

    To get the best next move in a strategy 2p game like chess or tic tac toe usually a decision tree based algorithms is used such as Minmax, which only look upto a certain depth.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #4

    pineconehenry

    Does this mean that playing against a computer exclusively will better prepare someone for matches against actual human beings? I play against computers exclusively, I feel like they will tolerate my blunders and general lack of skill with more grace than a real person...
  • 5 months ago · Quote · #5

    KevA93

    I have been playing against the computer a lot as well recently and have found that once you are ahead, the computer will generally stop trying. I have also noticed that the computer tends to be very materialistic so might grab a pawn even if it's not necessarily the best move. Playing against humans tends to be more double edged and more useful for improving as a player. Just my experienced this summer.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #6

    Alfarsi11

    I think one of the main advantages of playing against a computer is expanding your perspective of openings and their variations.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #7

    General-Mayhem

    KevA93 wrote:

    I have been playing against the computer a lot as well recently and have found that once you are ahead, the computer will generally stop trying. I have also noticed that the computer tends to be very materialistic so might grab a pawn even if it's not necessarily the best move. Playing against humans tends to be more double edged and more useful for improving as a player. Just my experienced this summer.

    I disagree, some of the most sneaky swindles on the receiving end of which I've been have been by computers!

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #8

    thechosen0ne

    Which computer programs are you playing against?

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #9

    KevA93

    Haha chess titans as it's all I have access to at the moment. I have come to realize it's surprisingly poor . Today on level 9/10 I was able to win a completely drawn endgame. I recently purchased Fritz 14 SE. Do any of you have experience of playing with that?

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #10

    thechosen0ne

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #11

    GalaxKing

    If your on Android, there is an app called Droid Fish. It's FREE. You can download Stockfish 6 for free. This is one of the top 3 most powerful engines on the World. Rated around 3100 +. It's not gonna cut you any slack. It will slice your openings to ribbons. There are similar apps available for Windows, like Arena, which is a GUI (graphic user interface) that you can install engines like Stockfish 6. However, too get back to the OP original question, Hikaru Nakamura, said that he trained extensively on master level chess engines when he was starting out and says that the stronger level you put it on, the faster you will learn. I have read other interviews by top masters saying they trained on a variety of different, strong, engines. If course, most masters will not admit this in public. Of course, you need to couple your computer playing with referring to a opening tree data base, and studying your endgame technique. The hardest thing, in my opinion about training against a strong Chess engine is the insane frustration in getting beat time after time after time. You need to extensively analyze your games and by doing this you will learn a lot about tactics. The advantage is that the tactics you learn from this method are intrinsically connected to your openings, middle games, as opposed to stand alone, meaningless tactic puzzles. Assuming you already have a knowledge of the basic tactic themes. It's much to easy to play endless games online against approximately equal opponents.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #12

    xman720

    Well I wouldn't call computers "materialistic"... more than half of Tal's sacrifices are reccomended by computers as the number 1 move and the vast majority are in the top 3.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #13

    Alaharon123

    You all know there's a chess.com app fight?

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #14

    DrFrank124c

    B4 the internet came along all I had to play with was a Radio Shack computer and it showed me a number of good strategies that I use to this day.  Nowadays I use Lucas Chess--which has 20 or so different engines to choose from--to analyze my games and it does point out interesting tactics and strategies from time to time.  It is especially good in pointing out the mistakes that I have made in the opening and thus improves my opening game skill.   

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #15

    KevA93

    Thanks for the insight folks.


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