Do adults become Grand Masters?

StephenMcGrew
MetalRatel wrote:

There are three modern examples that quickly come to mind:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Aagaard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_K._Shaw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Kaufman

They all have written popular chess books.

 

Regarding Aagaard: "Jacob Aagard was born in Denmark on July 31, 1973 and later moved to Glasgow, Scotland. In 1985, at the age of 12, Jacob learned how to play chess. At age 16, he was the champion of his local chess club in Denmark."

 

Regarding Kaufman: "My father taught me at age 7, and I had a lesson on how to do the king and rook checkmate at age 8 from Harold Phillips, the first USCF President and a New York Champion of the Year." "During high school I oscillated between Chess and Bridge, but by the time I entered college (Age 16) I dropped Bridge for Chess."

 

I suspect a similar story for Shaw. These people started as children.

darkunorthodox88
StephenMcGrew wrote:
MetalRatel wrote:

There are three modern examples that quickly come to mind:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Aagaard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_K._Shaw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Kaufman

They all have written popular chess books.

 

Regarding Aagaard: "Jacob Aagard was born in Denmark on July 31, 1973 and later moved to Glasgow, Scotland. In 1985, at the age of 12, Jacob learned how to play chess. At age 16, he was the champion of his local chess club in Denmark."

 

Regarding Kaufman: "My father taught me at age 7, and I had a lesson on how to do the king and rook checkmate at age 8 from Harold Phillips, the first USCF President and a New York Champion of the Year." "During high school I oscillated between Chess and Bridge, but by the time I entered college (Age 16) I dropped Bridge for Chess."

 

I suspect a similar story for Shaw. These people started as children.

if you want someone that learned chess very late that became gm, check out ye jiangchuan. learned chess at 17 .but who knows if he had experience with some similar board game, at a much earlier age that gave him that "boost" in pattern recognition.

 

the legendary mir sultan khan learned chess very late in life, but played indian chess at a very high level already.

PowerofHope

Jonathan Hawkins (born 1 May 1983) is an English chess Grandmaster. He was the British Chess Champion in 2015, having outscored David Howell, with whom he shared the title in 2014.

Hawkins's chess career is unusual for the modern era in that he showed only modest ability as a child; his improvement from club player to International Master took place after he left full-time education, and while living in County Durham, far from traditional centres of chess activity. [4] About this sudden rise through the rankings, in his 2012 endgame book Amateur to IM, he notes that "a careful study of the endgame sparked the biggest leap forward in my own game".

BobbyTalparov
PowerofHope wrote:

Jonathan Hawkins (born 1 May 1983) is an English chess Grandmaster. He was the British Chess Champion in 2015, having outscored David Howell, with whom he shared the title in 2014.

Hawkins's chess career is unusual for the modern era in that he showed only modest ability as a child; his improvement from club player to International Master took place after he left full-time education, and while living in County Durham, far from traditional centres of chess activity. [4] About this sudden rise through the rankings, in his 2012 endgame book Amateur to IM, he notes that "a careful study of the endgame sparked the biggest leap forward in my own game".

While Hawkins earned his titles as an adult, he wasn't exactly a weak player.  At the age of 23 (in 2006), he was already above 2200.

Rocky64
darkunorthodox88 wrote:

 

the legendary mir sultan khan learned chess very late in life, but played indian chess at a very high level already.

According to his Wiki article, Sultan Khan learned "western" chess aged 21 and was world-class just a few years later, based on his tournament results. He beat Capablanca in a top tournament game about 4 years after learning how to play!

AntonioEsfandiari

Do grandmasters become adults?

darkunorthodox88
BobbyTalparov wrote:
PowerofHope wrote:

Jonathan Hawkins (born 1 May 1983) is an English chess Grandmaster. He was the British Chess Champion in 2015, having outscored David Howell, with whom he shared the title in 2014.

Hawkins's chess career is unusual for the modern era in that he showed only modest ability as a child; his improvement from club player to International Master took place after he left full-time education, and while living in County Durham, far from traditional centres of chess activity. [4] About this sudden rise through the rankings, in his 2012 endgame book Amateur to IM, he notes that "a careful study of the endgame sparked the biggest leap forward in my own game".

While Hawkins earned his titles as an adult, he wasn't exactly a weak player.  At the age of 23 (in 2006), he was already above 2200.

are you familiar with how strong he was at age 18?

dan3460

I don't believe a player that is not strong when young can become a grand master. There is something in brain that intuitively tells you what is good or bad move, I have been looking for that “something” a good part of my life and I have not been able to find it. I'm old, late 50's, if I study and practice enough I can get to the mid upper 1500, but I have not been able to go higher. Still puzzle me when to move D3 or D4 for example, or with the E pawn. When I run a game on the computer, most of the time the engine tells me that the best move is D4, but I don’t see why, and in similar position I make a move like D4 and the engine tells me that is a bad move.

 

BobbyTalparov
darkunorthodox88 wrote:

are you familiar with how strong he was at age 18?

The FIDE ratings history does not go back that far; however, the articles that talk about his first British Championship win mention that he was a "mere club player" in his teens.  Based on that information and his strength at 23, I would say he probably was at least 1600 at 18.

 

The point being that he wasn't exactly a beginner as an adult.  However, I do not think that fact changes the point that he has shown it is possible.

PowerofHope

The reason I post this guy is because it gives us class A teenage players hope to be stronger at chess.

luckbird

no only kids