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Do you like/dislike the stalemate rule?

  • #41

    However, I still like the game. It's what makes it more fun and unique.

  • #42

    wow, they change the chess rules in Xiang Qi? Let me get this right, if I am losing in a Xiang Qi game but I manage to score the stalemate then it's not a draw, it's a loss? What is the point of playing on then to a stalemate?

  • #43

    And why was this forum locked for so long and now suddenly reopened? 

    Very weird.

  • #44

    Thanks for the pep talk VULPES_VULPES.  I guess you've given me another reason why I should never play Chinese Chess.  Like ever.  By the way, you want to know lucky?  The Vancouver Canucks making it to Round 1 of the 2012 Stanley Cup Playoffs <<< THAT'S lucky.  

  • #45

    A recent stalemate I got.

    http://live.chess.com/live?v=2012041801#g=285965814

  • #46

    Yeah, here's the recent stalement I was referring to.  

    http://www.chess.com/livechess/game.html?id=300823708 

  • #47
    MLHennessey wrote:

    Yeah, here's the recent stalement I was referring to.  

    http://www.chess.com/livechess/game.html?id=300823708 

    you shouldn't care about the knight on the last move just checkmate him with the rook on h8.
    that is the reason why I play against chessmaster it never resigns and I have to prove I can win. It makes all sorts of stalemate traps and therefore I have learned my own way of avoiding stalemate traps. by for example letting pawns walk as long as he has activity he cannot be stalemate. 
    I think stalemate occurs because most people are not used to defend a clear win they are used to an easy win there people resign.

  • #48
    bobbyDK wrote:

    you shouldn't care about the knight on the last move just checkmate him with the rook on h8.
    that is the reason why I play against chessmaster it never resigns and I have to prove I can win. It makes all sorts of stalemate traps and therefore I have learned my own way of avoiding stalemate traps. by for example letting pawns walk as long as he has activity he cannot be stalemate. 
    I think stalemate occurs because most people are not used to defend a clear win they are used to an easy win there people resign.

    Bobby, great insight man.  I will keep a better eye out for those stalemate traps you talk of and also go straight for the checkmate, as opposed to clearing off all of my opponent's pieces.  

  • #49

    allow me to present a masterpiece, sadly without annotations because I lost the book ''the art of defence'' where it's from.

     
    ..That was comical.

    Now for the real position:






  • #50

    lol.... 

  • #51

    ^check my post again! I kind of screwed up!

  • #52

    just a little.. hehe

  • #53

    @ Helzeth:  What's sad is that I almost tried those Spiderman king moves. Lol Fail.  

  • #54
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #55

    Again...wtf.  Lol  

    http://live.chess.com/live?v=2012051801#g=301220104   

  • #56
    chess_kebabs wrote:

    wow, they change the chess rules in Xiang Qi? Let me get this right, if I am losing in a Xiang Qi game but I manage to score the stalemate then it's not a draw, it's a loss? What is the point of playing on then to a stalemate?

    No, they did not. I was referring to our chess and the stalemate rule that makes it unique. You misunderstand.

    As for your second question.

    Playing a losing game in Chinese culture probably meant vanity. A stalemate would be looked down upon as a desperate action to achieve something that will be unsuccessful. 

    In other words, the reasons for the stalemate-equals-loss rule is that

    a) all they see is success or failure - no draw. Once you've a disadvantage in terms of material or position, they believe that that player is "destined" for loss and shame.

    b) the failure to checkmate the opponent but stalemating him/her/it is frowned upon. Why try to kill the opponent if you can't succeed?

  • #57
    VULPES_VULPES wrote:

    b) the failure to checkmate the opponent but stalemating him/her/it is frowned upon. Why try to kill the opponent if you can't succeed?

    To stop your opponent killing you. Laughing

  • #58
    chess_kebabs wrote:
    VULPES_VULPES wrote:

    b) the failure to checkmate the opponent but stalemating him/her/it is frowned upon. Why try to kill the opponent if you can't succeed?

    To stop your opponent killing you. 

    Nevertheless, it is still frowned upon. Once they start losing, they are lost. No second chances.

  • #59

    every man and woman has a right to self-defence! lol

  • #60

    I'm not the one who thinks that, but Chinese culture.

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