Free Chess Advise (Ask me any question Regarding CHESS)

MEMEdank70

How would one "study" an opening?

SoshoallyUnfit

How do you teach a 4 year old how to play chess? 

Freudenburg

What does it mean on chess.com when move notation is added to the end of an opening name (i.e. Sicilian Defense: Open, Najdorf, Amsterdam Variation, 6...e5 )? Does this mean it is not a book move or that it depends on the opponent's response if it's considered a book move? Or neither? Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

 

Louis

little_guinea_pig
chamo2074 wrote:

Ok, I will ask you a few questions and will see if you can answer me, here is my first question:

1) In the french defense, a fun dynamic line is the Morozevitch which goes like that:

What it does is create imbalances immediately. The plan for black is to control the light squares in the center as you know right? you're making a thread to give advice

According to that, the mainline is to play c4 preventing b5 expansion and stopping the bad bishop from getting to the long diagonal:

However, I keep facing this annoying d5 pawn sac idea for example:

Here, I lost the game horribly... best move according to the engine is Bc5 but this break occurs in a lot of different ways and Bc5 is not always efficiently available. Therefore can you give me an accurate, consistent, and efficient way of countering it?

I remember that game wink.png

ChesswithNickolay
Freudenburg wrote:

What does it mean on chess.com when move notation is added to the end of an opening name (i.e. Sicilian Defense: Open, Najdorf, Amsterdam Variation, 6...e5 )? Does this mean it is not a book move or that it depends on the opponent's response if it's considered a book move? Or neither? Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

 

Louis

I have no idea what this is. I have the same question.

LandoCalrissian1

YO BOI!!!!!!!!!!!!!11

ChesswithNickolay
SoshoallyUnfit wrote:

How do you teach a 4 year old how to play chess? 

I suggest by buying a big chess board, playing with them when they are free, and when it is afternoon or in the evening. Naming each figure in your native language (if you have one) can also work. Giving the chess board as a gift for a holiday makes it more special. These are all how I managed to gain an interest in chess.

ChesswithNickolay
MEMEdank70 wrote:

How would one "study" an opening?

Looking the opening up in master games at chessgames.com, watching @gothamchess and hangingpawns on YouTube, analyzing the best moves in response to your opponent's moves on several websites, and these are only some of the ways to do so. I will make a detailed blog once I reach 1600 in either rapid or blitz about how to study and master an opening step by step.

ChesswithNickolay

I am not going to respond to any comments till I get either my blitz to 1600 or my rapid to 1600. I responded to some recently due to the fact that they might not have seen this message on page 8.

MEMEdank70
ChesswithNickolay wrote:
MEMEdank70 wrote:

How would one "study" an opening?

Looking the opening up in master games at chessgames.com, watching @gothamchess and hangingpawns on YouTube, analyzing the best moves in response to your opponent's moves on several websites, and these are only some of the ways to do so. I will make a detailed blog once I reach 1600 in either rapid or blitz about how to study and master an opening step by step.

How would I do that without premium on chessgames?

JackRoach
Freudenburg wrote:

What does it mean on chess.com when move notation is added to the end of an opening name (i.e. Sicilian Defense: Open, Najdorf, Amsterdam Variation, 6...e5 )? Does this mean it is not a book move or that it depends on the opponent's response if it's considered a book move? Or neither? Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

 

Louis

It means it leads into a line that is more commonly named.

Because you can't say: French variation so-and-so move 6, Ruy Lopez Berlin move 5 variation of blah blah, etc.

chamo2074

It means a book move that doesn't have a name