Help me.

bookwritter

SlowDanceWithMe

Because black can play Ne4. If you play Qc2 instead, then you can pick off the new e4 pawn. I'll let someone higher rated explain why the b2 pawn can be lost and how to deal with it.

 

 

bookwritter

Sorry, I forgot to mention that I am playing black and the wrong move is Ne4. 

ghost_of_pushwood

Well, what did Stockfish tell you?  Does it hang something?

SlowDanceWithMe
bookwritter wrote:

Sorry, I forgot to mention that I am playing black and the wrong move is Ne4. 

 

Yea, I didn't read your post close enough. Kinda the same thing but reverse. White could have improved on their position with Qc2 because of the pawn, and black could have avoided having the pawn on e4.

 

Stockfish is showing Rfe8. I think that is because it can attack the e3 pawn, but it also allows for Rxe4 if knights trade. Bc5 has some additional moves, but essentially the same thing is being addressed, the e4 square. That appears to be the key point of this position. Qa7 seems rather pointless to me, but Stockfish is showing it too. Maybe someone higher rated can explain any use of that, but I would go with the simple idea to not move the same piece twice and get the rooks in the center with Rfe8.

bookwritter

Thanks a lot! I thought about it, Ne4 seems to be a positional mistake, because with knight trades I am blocking the E file, where I could have put my Rook to put pressure on his weak E3 pawn.

dpcjsr

From a positional point of view white's weakness is the e3 pawn. 16...Ne4 allows white to eliminate that weakness by playing 17.Nxe4. White has two pawn islands to blacks three. The black pawns at a6 c6 and e4 are targets. White has an easy game with active play. 

ghost_of_pushwood

So what did Stockfish say?  How big a mistake was it?

bookwritter
ghost_of_pushwood escreveu:

So what did Stockfish say?  How big a mistake was it?

Stockfish evaluated Ne4 move as 1.5 for white.