How to stay objective and efficient in chess?

KingSideInvasion

Hey all. I have recently noticed quite a big difference between me and strong chess players. That is the objectivity and efficiency in the thought process in chess. See, I don't find my understanding of concepts in chess to be terribly weak, but rather how I execute this understanding. I very often find myself looking for things that don't exist, spending way too much time looking for the perfect plan, or even making decisions based more on emotion than actually reading the chessboard and playing as the position demands me to do. 

Whenever I see a strong player commentate games live (Mainly on youtube), even blitz games occasionally, I am astounded by the clarity of their thoughts, the objectivity, and the efficiency in the way they find their moves. It's not that I do not understand the moves, but rather how they find such accurate moves with such objectivity and speed. 

I understand that probably part of it is engraining positional patterns and studying how pawn structures and different openings affect plans, and just generally accumulating experience, but besides this, is there anything I can do to make the gap between me and strong players in this regard slightly smaller?

awesomeadithya

more puzzle rush helps a lot, if you looked at my past 5 min blitz games, you'll see it helps a lot. try playing 3min puzzle rush so that you get used to finding tactics in a short time

KingSideInvasion
awesomeadithya wrote:

more puzzle rush helps a lot, if you looked at my past 5 min blitz games, you'll see it helps a lot. try playing 3min puzzle rush so that you get used to finding tactics in a short time

Good advice, though puzzle rush only really helps to get a sharp tactical eye. I am talking more about planning, strategy, and deep calculations. Definitely good to improve both though!

SocialistEgypt

They said the Russian team had Sex with their wives to get a performance boost, also in football Netherlands team in WC 2014 were allowed to have Sex with their wives, they were one of the best.

KingSideInvasion
SocialistEgypt wrote:

They said the Russian team had Sex with their wives to get a performance boost, also in football Netherlands team in WC 2014 were allowed to have Sex with their wives, they were one of the best.

 I don't see how this is relevant to my question?

jleronce

If you haven't focused on the development of your pieces while playing, try to give that a whirl. Get everybody involved in the fight. Don't exchange a piece unless you are further developing. Try to squeeze a good position into a suffocating one. I used to be a wicked pawn thief until I realized the game's not over when you capture some pawns, only the king. Wish I could give you better advice but I'm in the same boat :)

KingSideInvasion
jleronce wrote:

If you haven't focused on the development of your pieces while playing, try to give that a whirl. Get everybody involved in the fight. Don't exchange a piece unless you are further developing. Try to squeeze a good position into a suffocating one. I used to be a wicked pawn thief until I realized the game's not over when you capture some pawns, only the king. Wish I could give you better advice but I'm in the same boat :)

Again, this is great specific advice, but I am looking for something more general. I understand the principles, I just want my thought process to be cleaner.

KingSideInvasion

Also just to everybody, do not look at my blitz games if you wish to give me more specific advice. My rapid games are the ones that mainly carry this problem, but I am really bad at blitz.

KingSideInvasion

Plus if you notice I don't play blitz very often recently.

nexim

Honest answer? They've just seen more positions, practiced more tactics, analyzed their games, studied more theory and simply played more chess games than you have. If you're able to self-reflect on your mistakes and make a habit out of trying to understand what you did well and what mistakes you made, you will constantly learn and get better. If you're watching a master level player streaming on Twitch or watch a recording on YouTube, what you're seeing is the result of probably decades of practice, hard work and dedication.

I mean it is important to be effective in your practice (play slower time controls, analyze your games, train tactics and go through chess books with serious effort), but there is no other short cut to this clarity. It's just practice and experience. And when it comes to very high rated players they probably have thousands upon thousands of hours of serious practice under their belt.

KingSideInvasion
nexim wrote:

Honest answer? They've just seen more positions, practiced more tactics, analyzed their games, studied more theory and simply played more chess games than you have. If you're able to self-reflect on your mistakes and make a habit out of trying to understand what you did well and what mistakes you made, you will constantly learn and get better. If you're watching a master level player streaming on Twitch or watch a recording on YouTube, what you're seeing is the result of probably decades of practice, hard work and dedication.

I mean it is important to be effective in your practice (play slower time controls, analyze your games, train tactics and go through chess books with serious effort), but there is no other short cut to this clarity. It's just practice and experience. And when it comes to very high rated players they probably have thousands upon thousands of hours of serious practice under their belt.

Slower time controls? I wish chess.com had classical time controls because I agree 30 minutes is little time.

nexim

I think 30 minutes for time control is pretty good for training purposes. It's much better than blitz or bullet, that's for sure. Compared to classical time controls you can get more games under your belt playing 30 mins, which might be more useful than having one very long game. If you keep playing 30 minute games, try to analyze them afterwards (and later with an engine) and make a habit out of this you will keep getting better and better if you just keep grinding.

SNUDOO

Usually I kinda visualize things using analogies in my head. For example, the backwards pawn. I always thought that looked like punching someone except you're throwing the punch without putting your body behind it, instead trying to swing your fist like a wrecking ball, which makes it very inefficient. ( I recognized the weakness of backwards pawn before I learned it was called backwards pawn, lol)

This method also made me very in tune with square weaknesses

KingSideInvasion
nexim wrote:

I think 30 minutes for time control is pretty good for training purposes. It's much better than blitz or bullet, that's for sure. Compared to classical time controls you can get more games under your belt playing 30 mins, which might be more useful than having one very long game. If you keep playing 30 minute games, try to analyze them afterwards (and later with an engine) and make a habit out of this you will keep getting better and better if you just keep grinding.

Well it's certainly good training for time pressure

KingSideInvasion
SNUDOO wrote:

Usually I kinda visualize things using analogies in my head. For example, the backwards pawn. I always thought that looked like punching someone except you're throwing the punch without putting your body behind it, instead trying to swing your fist like a wrecking ball, which makes it very inefficient. ( I recognized the weakness of backwards pawn before I learned it was called backwards pawn, lol)

This method also made me very in tune with square weaknesses

I do not have trouble identifiying weaknesses, it's one of the few things that always came instinctually. This is great advice though. 

SNUDOO
KingSideInvasion wrote:
SNUDOO wrote:

Usually I kinda visualize things using analogies in my head. For example, the backwards pawn. I always thought that looked like punching someone except you're throwing the punch without putting your body behind it, instead trying to swing your fist like a wrecking ball, which makes it very inefficient. ( I recognized the weakness of backwards pawn before I learned it was called backwards pawn, lol)

This method also made me very in tune with square weaknesses

I do not have trouble identifiying weaknesses, it's one of the few things that always came instinctually. This is great advice though. 

I view things better when I'm thinking graphically. Personally the key to getting better is to be more consistent. Perhaps you are able to convert a two bishop vs two knights endgame 50% of the time. Practice and up it to 75%, or (ideally) 100%.