I Don't Improve

OpeningTheorist
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

Vicariously-I
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

He needs to learn opening PRINCIPLES, not specific openings. His opponents likely won't play book moves so learning opening theory will be of little use to him.

OpeningTheorist
Vicariously-I wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

He needs to learn opening PRINCIPLES, not specific openings. His opponents won't play book moves so learning opening theory will be if no use to him.

The opening principles is opening knowledge. Also he should focus on one opening or two so he can know how to properly develop a middlegame

IMBacon
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

I knew a guy that for years all he taught were openings.  And just the openings he played.  He was a USCF 1200 player.  Needless to say he never kept a student for long.

Im not bagging on openings, but trying to teach someone openings when they dont even understand the basics seems like such a waste.  Its like trying to teach someone to speed read, when they dont even know how to read.

OpeningTheorist
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

I knew a guy that for years all he taught were openings.  And just the openings he played.  He was a USCF 1200 player.  Needless to say he never kept a student for long.

Im not bagging on openings, but trying to teach someone openings when they dont even understand the basics seems like such a waste.  Its like trying to teach someone to speed read, when they dont even know how to read.

Maybe I shouldn't have suposed that a 1000 would know the basics.

IMBacon
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

I knew a guy that for years all he taught were openings.  And just the openings he played.  He was a USCF 1200 player.  Needless to say he never kept a student for long.

Im not bagging on openings, but trying to teach someone openings when they dont even understand the basics seems like such a waste.  Its like trying to teach someone to speed read, when they dont even know how to read.

Maybe I shouldn't have suposed that a 1000 would know the basics.

All any of us can do is to look at the OP's games, and decide what we think is best.  But being here for years and seeing the usual cast of characters: "I know the <insert opening here> 20 moves deep, but i keep dropping material.  Do i need to study more openings?"  "I'm a tactical player.  What openings should i play?" "I have been here for 4 years and cant seem to improve.  Do i need to study more openings, or play more blitz?"

At some point in time.  Someone decided that the key to chess improvement was to spend all your time on openings.  It didn't matter if you just learned how to play.  It didn't matter if you hang material.  It didn't matter if you play bullet.  It didn't matter if you play constantly. Someone got it in there head that openings are the key to everything.  I can understand this mentality.  It sounds really cool to say you know an opening 20 moves deep.  It sounds really cool to be able to say you're a tactical player.  It sounds really cool to impress people with how aggressive your play is.  It sounds really cool to know the names of all kinds of side variations.  But ya know whats hard?  Actually getting in and really learning, and understanding the game.  Not just memorizing a bunch of openings.  But to each there own.

damafe

https://www.chess.com/article/view/how-to-start-out-in-chess

OpeningTheorist
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

I knew a guy that for years all he taught were openings.  And just the openings he played.  He was a USCF 1200 player.  Needless to say he never kept a student for long.

Im not bagging on openings, but trying to teach someone openings when they dont even understand the basics seems like such a waste.  Its like trying to teach someone to speed read, when they dont even know how to read.

Maybe I shouldn't have suposed that a 1000 would know the basics.

All any of us can do is to look at the OP's games, and decide what we think is best.  But being here for years and seeing the usual cast of characters: "I know the <insert opening here> 20 moves deep, but i keep dropping material.  Do i need to study more openings?"  "I'm a tactical player.  What openings should i play?" "I have been here for 4 years and cant seem to improve.  Do i need to study more openings, or play more blitz?"

At some point in time.  Someone decided that the key to chess improvement was to spend all your time on openings.  It didn't matter if you just learned how to play.  It didn't matter if you hang material.  It didn't matter if you play bullet.  It didn't matter if you play constantly. Someone got it in there head that openings are the key to everything.  I can understand this mentality.  It sounds really cool to say you know an opening 20 moves deep.  It sounds really cool to be able to say you're a tactical player.  It sounds really cool to impress people with how aggressive your play is.  It sounds really cool to know the names of all kinds of side variations.  But ya know whats hard?  Actually getting in and really learning, and understanding the game.  Not just memorizing a bunch of openings.  But to each there own.

I don't mean that the openings are the most important, I just like to study them. Anyway, you are right mate wink.png

IMBacon
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:
IMBacon wrote:
OpeningTheorist wrote:

I can help you at improving your openings if you want  

As is the case 99.99% of the time.  Openings are not the issue.

A G30:

https://www.chess.com/live/game/3151590033?username=chigetsu

The OP lost in 15 moves.  And the painful part?  The OP used 1 minute 6 seconds for 12 moves. 

The OP spent 5.5 seconds per move.  Among his other games, it was the usual:

Not following opening principles.

Missing simple tactics.

Hanging material.

Yes you are right but he clearly needs some opening knowledge too (and as you don't have to be a GM to teach openings I though I could help).

I knew a guy that for years all he taught were openings.  And just the openings he played.  He was a USCF 1200 player.  Needless to say he never kept a student for long.

Im not bagging on openings, but trying to teach someone openings when they dont even understand the basics seems like such a waste.  Its like trying to teach someone to speed read, when they dont even know how to read.

Maybe I shouldn't have suposed that a 1000 would know the basics.

All any of us can do is to look at the OP's games, and decide what we think is best.  But being here for years and seeing the usual cast of characters: "I know the <insert opening here> 20 moves deep, but i keep dropping material.  Do i need to study more openings?"  "I'm a tactical player.  What openings should i play?" "I have been here for 4 years and cant seem to improve.  Do i need to study more openings, or play more blitz?"

At some point in time.  Someone decided that the key to chess improvement was to spend all your time on openings.  It didn't matter if you just learned how to play.  It didn't matter if you hang material.  It didn't matter if you play bullet.  It didn't matter if you play constantly. Someone got it in there head that openings are the key to everything.  I can understand this mentality.  It sounds really cool to say you know an opening 20 moves deep.  It sounds really cool to be able to say you're a tactical player.  It sounds really cool to impress people with how aggressive your play is.  It sounds really cool to know the names of all kinds of side variations.  But ya know whats hard?  Actually getting in and really learning, and understanding the game.  Not just memorizing a bunch of openings.  But to each there own.

I don't mean that the openings are the most important, I just like to study them. Anyway, you are right mate

If you enjoy studying openings, and it brings you joy then carry on.  As for me? Its not about being right, its about offering the best possible advice to the OP.

kindaspongey

https://www.chess.com/article/view/study-plan-directory
"... In order to maximize the benefits of [theory and practice], these two should be approached in a balanced manner. ... Play as many slow games (60 5 or preferably slower) as possible, ... The other side of improvement is theory. ... This can be reading books, taking lessons, watching videos, doing problems on software, etc. ..." - NM Dan Heisman (2002)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627084053/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman19.pdf
"... If it’s instruction, you look for an author that addresses players at your level (buying something that’s too advanced won’t help you at all). This means that a classic book that is revered by many people might not be useful for you. ..." - IM Jeremy Silman (2015)
https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-best-chess-books-ever
Here are some reading possibilities that I often mention:
Simple Attacking Plans by Fred Wilson (2012)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090402/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review874.pdf
http://dev.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Simple-Attacking-Plans-77p3731.htm
Logical Chess: Move by Move by Irving Chernev (1957)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708104437/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/logichess.pdf
The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by Irving Chernev (1965)
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/most-instructive-games-of-chess-ever-played/
Winning Chess by Irving Chernev and Fred Reinfeld (1948)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708093415/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review919.pdf
Back to Basics: Tactics by Dan Heisman (2007)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708233537/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review585.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-back-to-basics-tactics
Discovering Chess Openings by GM John Emms (2006)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf
Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro (2014)
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/05/review-of-pete-tamburros-openings-for.html
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/openings-for-amateurs/
https://www.mongoosepress.com/catalog/excerpts/openings_amateurs.pdf
Chess Endgames for Kids by Karsten Müller (2015)
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/chess-endgames-for-kids/
http://www.gambitbooks.com/pdfs/Chess_Endgames_for_Kids.pdf
A Guide to Chess Improvement by Dan Heisman (2010)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708105628/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review781.pdf
Studying Chess Made Easy by Andrew Soltis (2009)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090448/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review750.pdf
Seirawan stuff:
http://seagaard.dk/review/eng/bo_beginner/ev_winning_chess.asp?KATID=BO&ID=BO-Beginner
http://www.nystar.com/tamarkin/review1.htm
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-winning-chess-endings
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708092617/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review560.pdf

Eti-10
Hello
Chigetsu

Looking back at this thread I feel so sorry for myself lol

I was blinded by how little I improve that I thought that I don't improve at all.

harbi_canoshi

No one will give you any information to help you. They will only tell you why you aren't improving. And keep telling you this in as many ways as they can.

Personally, I think, of it, as watching a movie. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. You have no control over who the algorithm picks for you to play. There is a degree of luck involved in whether your rating goes up or down. 

As Bill Hicks used to say, "Enjoy the ride." 

torrubirubi

A quick way to improve is:

1. No blitz, or very few blitz (less than 5% of your games). Better Daily Chess.

2. If you play Daily Chess, write down all your thoughts during the games. Write down what do you think your opponent is aiming by playing a certain move, what you was afraid at a certain position, what each of your moves did to improve your position. After the game, post your game with the comments and ask other players for help. Don't even think on using engine when you post your game. The engine you will use only after people discussed your game.

3. Train tactics in the most effective way. This means, you should repeat a puzzle several times until you are able to remember the tactics immediately. Certainly the best way to be effective in tactics is using spaced repetition. I suggest you following book: 

 

"1001 Chess Exercises for Beginners" (available in Chessable)

 

Here the description:

Chess is 99% tactics!

If this celebrated observation is true for the master, how much more so for the beginner and club player. 

By far and away, the quickest and most effective way to improve your chess performance is to increase your tactical skill so that at a glance you are able to see the typical mating patterns and material-winning tactical motifs that so often decide a game. 

There is no doubt that the best way to acquire good tactical vision is to do exercises that teach you to recognise the tactical building blocks that make up every combination. This book focuses on the crucial positions that every chess player must know. 

It cannot be stressed enough that a knowledge of strategy is of little use if you have not first mastered the fundamentals of tactics. 

This book starts with hundreds of essential mating positions that train immediate visual recognition; first there are the easier mate in one or two move exercises; then there are exercises for various crucial tactical motifs that must be mastered by any aspiring chess player; these are followed by more demanding positions where these various motifs are often combined. 

The introductions to each chapter are particularly instructive. It is here that we explain the ideas behind crucial tactical motifs such as double attack, the pin and skewer, as well as pawn promotion, drawing techniques, etc. 

This book is intended not only for personal use, but also as a course text book. 

We have thus consulted leading teachers and masters with extensive training experience working in chess academies and club courses so as to best identify the most productive positions and exercises to use. 

Franco Masetti and Roberto Messa

If you train regularly with this book, you will have MUCH more fun playing chess. You will immediately recognize tactics in your games, both those which you can use and those you can prevent.

4. Begin already now to learn a basic opening repertoire for black and white. I mean really a basic repertoire, for example 1.d4 as white and 1...e6 against 1.e4 as black, 1...d5 against 1.d4, etc. You will also find several great books at Chessable, some for free. Please note that I am not telling you to learn only openings. You should learn tactics (you should go several times through the book I should above), but you can invest perhaps 20% of your training time with openings, so you will get a general idea how to play through the opening and reach a playable middlegame.

Good luck.