I have over 45 chess books but I don't understand a single one of them

amiakr8

One more thing.  Don't try to checkmate your opponent in 5 moves (or less).  Anybody with any experience will see through it in about 2 seconds.

incorrectname

A silman's endgame book has a section for each rating range

MetalRatel

This was my (or rather my father's) chess library when I started to learn chess as a kid:

Winning Chess Tactics Illustrated (Horowitz)

Logical Chess: Move by Move (Chernev)

Fischer v. Spassky (C. H. O'D Alexander)

(Although I like Logical Chess for its applicable themes and game selection, I wouldn't necessarily recommend the other two to a beginner, but this was all I had!)

As a beginner, I felt I made the most tangible progress with Logical Chess, although working tactics definitely helped. I put a lot of work into reading this book. I even went through it all a second time. I could see progress when I didn't have to move the pieces over the board to understand variations. The abundance of resources today probably makes chess study confusing for the beginner. I think it would be a good idea to choose three quality books and stick to them. Chess is a struggle and some new concepts won't be easy to understand right away. If you have 45 books, it is probably easier to get distracted from learning one book well. I didn't have a choice but to focus on three books when I started, but you may need to use some restraint to limit your selection. I think studying one book well is much better than superficially reading ten.  (Note I made the distinction of "studying" - it makes a difference to read actively with a board in front of you and ask your own questions.)

Excalibr4

 For what it's worth, you need to study openings more. I researched your skills based on your TT vs blitz vs bullet. Your TT rating shows you have the skills to compete with 2000 rated players (in the mid game), but your bullet rating says you don't have your opening skills down. It takes a lot of work to memorize all the openings 5 to 6 moves out, but that's exactly what Bobby Fischer did, when he was a kid. He read over 4000 books on chess. However, the computer makes it far easier and faster to learn all these. It's boring and time consuming, but necessary. Reminds me of a doctor friend of mine. He never opened a book in medical school (his dad was a doctor), but he recorded every lecture. He is very successful now. My point being, hands on experience, against a computer, teaches you what you need to know, without all the reasoning behind each move. It becomes second nature, allowing you to reach mid game, where all the real action starts. As I mentioned before, your TT rating says you have a good mid game skill level and once you memorize the openings your bullet rating will soar.

kindaspongey

"... Overall, I would advise most players to stick to a fairly limited range of openings, and not to worry about learning too much by heart. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)
"... I feel that the main reasons to buy an opening book are to give a good overview of the opening, and to explain general plans and ideas. ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)
"... the average player only needs to know a limited amount about the openings he plays. Providing he understands the main aims of the opening, a few typical plans and a handful of basic variations, that is enough. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)

incorrectname

tf

incorrectname

account created just for that?!

ilovesmetuna
robbie_1969 wrote:
ilovesmetuna wrote:
some see spam as spam, unless your chess is really bad.

Lol The op can come back in a month and with Spongebobs help make a thread

I have over 145 chess books but I don't understand a single one of them

looking forward to it robbie happy.png

EndgameStudier
Excalibr4 wrote:

 For what it's worth, you need to study openings more. I researched your skills based on your TT vs blitz vs bullet. Your TT rating shows you have the skills to compete with 2000 rated players (in the mid game), but your bullet rating says you don't have your opening skills down. It takes a lot of work to memorize all the openings 5 to 6 moves out, but that's exactly what Bobby Fischer did, when he was a kid. He read over 4000 books on chess. However, the computer makes it far easier and faster to learn all these. It's boring and time consuming, but necessary. Reminds me of a doctor friend of mine. He never opened a book in medical school (his dad was a doctor), but he recorded every lecture. He is very successful now. My point being, hands on experience, against a computer, teaches you what you need to know, without all the reasoning behind each move. It becomes second nature, allowing you to reach mid game, where all the real action starts. As I mentioned before, your TT rating says you have a good mid game skill level and once you memorize the openings your bullet rating will soar.

I actually think taking more time in the opening in a bullet game and having fast endgame skills when you reach a winning position will be more beneficial to winning the game with a few second left

kindaspongey
RussBell wrote (~3 days ago):

@pdve -

Checking your stats we see that you have played the following:

Blitz = 4467 games

Rapid = 1110 games

Bullet = 578 game

Daily = 198 games ...

Excalibr4 wrote (~17 hours ago): "... once you memorize the openings your bullet rating will soar."

Is there a reason to suppose the main interest is in bullet games?

BrazilianBrother1996

The great secret to improve is to study good books and solve complex tactics. (Yes, the Captain Obvious strikes again!)

Klauer
robbie_1969 hat geschrieben:

chess books I think should be for enjoyment.  If you enjoy chess and reading and playing over games why not?  Find a chess book that you actually enjoy, its half the battle.  It probably doesn’t matter what it is as long as you are exposing your mind to different types of positions and you are actively engaging in analysis and enjoying it.  If you don't enjoy it, try another until you find one that you do enjoy.  All chess games have a narrative.

This is very important. As amateur you might start with and only with something giving you pleasure. Else you will stop using it.

There was another post here, as important. Read one, two or three books several times and look, what they tell you about the games you play(ed).

 

I have nearly 1000 chess books and I like it. But I don't expect from no book to make me a better player. Becoming a better player needs basically other things than chess books. Books are a useful medium! Analyzing your games with players of equal strength and stronger are the best help. Moving pieces over the board in training is a useful help too, if done seriously with a notebook.

 

And this leads to the book you should like most: Your notebook! It shows your errors and successes in learning, personal, truthful, without despection.

robbie_1969
Klauer wrote:

This is very important. As amateur you might start with and only with something giving you pleasure. Else you will stop using it.

There was another post here, as important. Read one, two or three books several times and look, what they tell you about the games you play(ed).

 

I have nearly 1000 chess books and I like it. But I don't expect from no book to make me a better player. Becoming a better player needs basically other things than chess books. Books are a useful medium! Analyzing your games with players of equal strength and stronger are the best help. Moving pieces over the board in training is a useful help too, if done seriously with a notebook.

 

And this leads to the book you should like most: Your notebook! It shows your errors and successes in learning, personal, truthful, without despection.

Yes because when we are learning sometimes the learning curve is so steep that we become disillusioned with the pain and simply give up, anything that can help is good and like you say motivation is key.

chessbased

That's pathetic,maybe donate the books to someone who need them really.may be ebay them?

Klauer
chessbased hat geschrieben:

That's pathetic,maybe donate the books to someone who need them really.may be ebay them?

You don't understand. Having them is fun. Looking into them is fun. If a young man or women really needs a chess book she or he gets it from me. But that's another topic.

Important for everybody using chessbooks is to select the right book for his level. You won't give a 4th class mathematical book to a 10th class pupil except in a very special situation. And you won't give a reading primer to a 4th class pupil too.

pawnstorm17
Time to switch to just watching videos instead 😅
amiakr8

Excellent idea (videos)

importantheart

What are you talking about?

robbie_1969

Actually videos have the tendency to spoon feed the viewer whereas when you are presented with a text you must at least make the effort to read and assimilate the material.

Nehaabbas092536
Some chess books are pretty old , so try to check latest ones. If you are good at chess , you might be able understand the books .