I'm in big trouble - please help (how to beat someone 600 ELO better than you)

catdogorb
ghost_of_pushwood wrote:

I don't know when everybody started turning into Norman Vincent Peale...but it sure has made things sappy of late.

 It's true though, that to score an upset (or just play well in general) you can't play scared. That makes it much easier on the opponent. You have to believe you can win, even though that does sound really sappy.

ghost_of_pushwood

Honestly, I don't really agree with that.  I've always tended to be pessimistic about my positions, which (possibly) makes me more aware of things at times.  Of course you don't want to be abject and hapless...but wearing a Warren Beatty grin of positivity everywhere you go doesn't seem like a recipe for success either (although I guess it worked for him).

catdogorb

The way I experience playing, it feels like I have to push hard for keeping my pieces active, or pushing my agenda. Playing inactive / lazy moves are too easy, so at least for me personally I have to try hard.

Part of that is after calculating a position, I reach something unclear, do I go for the active plan or the lazy plan? I think if someone chooses the non-active choice whenever things are unclear then they're probably not playing as well as they could be.

catdogorb

So other than optimism, I guess I might call it trusting in the position.

As a very basic example, if I have 4 pieces attaching your long king, and I calculate a line where I sacrifice two of them to infiltrate leaving me with a queen and knight vs your open king, I don't keep calculating, I probably just trust there's a mate in there somewhere. Or, you know, I might look at the rest of the position and figure out how much material I'm likely to get back, or how many moves my initiative may last, and then just go for it.

ghost_of_pushwood

Well, I find it a lot easier to trust in my position against a class player than against a GM. wink.png  Sure, I'll go ahead and do whatever I have planned...I'm just not gonna bet the farm on the outcome.

I had a friend--same rating as mine and completely the opposite:  the quintessence of optimism.  So I think all sorts of outlooks can (potentially) succeed at the game.

catdogorb

I can be pretty sure my opponent will win, based on the rating, but I'm not going to... how to say it... I'm not going to change the way I play. Boiling it down, I guess that's the basic advice... it's just being expressed oddly i.e. "be optimistic."

I'll do my analysis, and if the move seems good, I'm not going to let the opponent's rating change my mind.

ghost_of_pushwood

Oh yeah, don't go for a draw every move!  And don't trade down like some mechanical device.  Yeah, you've got to play your own game. happy.png

ghost_of_pushwood

Still though, all this advice and it didn't end up helping the OP sad.png (whose announcement of his result kinda got buried back there)...

catdogorb

Yeah he said he tried to get his opponent out of book... I mean... that's ok as long as you're not just as confused as they are... because those extra rating points are gonna count for something if you're both confused wink.png

catdogorb

When a lower rated player goes for some line with a lot of theory, I've sometimes made my next two moves inaccurate on purpose, just to be sure we're out of book. Usually works out for me.

But I wouldn't try that with someone rated 600 points above me hehe.

ghost_of_pushwood

Reminds me of when I was playing my old microprocessor a lot.  And I would come up with stuff like 1 c4 c5 2 d3...just to disengage it from its stored memory. happy.png