Is there any chance that a 1300 rated player can beat a 2700 rated player?


  • 9 days ago · Quote · #3681

    LeComtedeMonteCristo

    Thérèse is a probability but it is so little so we can consider that it is impossible
  • 9 days ago · Quote · #3682

    mdinnerspace

    What us the point tom? Anyone can make up a scenario.

  • 8 days ago · Quote · #3683

    Bakup

    Yes people can get godlike lucky rarely every now and then but highly unlikely there is a reason why Midgits don't fight giants, same reason why elo giants don't bother with elo midgits.

  • 8 days ago · Quote · #3684

    Elubas

    mdinnerspace wrote:

    @ Elubas... you play table tennis? Well I do. Having won several national titles and played vs world class players I can say there are many holes in your comparisons. 1st., quick reflexes is a muscle reaction, different from "anticipation" of opponents next shot. Both are possessed by good pjayers.

    Spatial recognition and pattern recognition, I agree are 2 separate things. I should have been referring to pattern recognition as the more useful tool.

    Well in a book I read (the author was a table tennis pro himself), there was a dude who had the quickest reflexes... or so it seemed. He would return the ball in a more timely manner than anyone else in their club or something. But then they all played a "pure" reflex exercise, you make a movement or something as soon as you hear a beep or something like that, and that "fast" guy did the worst out of the whole group. At least according to the author. Sure, that was just a game, but if you're going to argue for this "general" skill of reflexes that you need for table tennis, surely a person who is good at table tennis reflexes must be good at many different kinds of reflexes. In reality though, that's not necessarily the case at all.

  • 8 days ago · Quote · #3685

    TheronG12

    Elubas написал:
    mdinnerspace wrote:

    @ Elubas... you play table tennis? Well I do. Having won several national titles and played vs world class players I can say there are many holes in your comparisons. 1st., quick reflexes is a muscle reaction, different from "anticipation" of opponents next shot. Both are possessed by good pjayers.

    Spatial recognition and pattern recognition, I agree are 2 separate things. I should have been referring to pattern recognition as the more useful tool.

    Well in a book I read (the author was a table tennis pro himself), there was a dude who had the quickest reflexes... or so it seemed. He would return the ball in a more timely manner than anyone else in their club or something. But then they all played a "pure" reflex exercise, you make a movement or something as soon as you hear a beep or something like that, and that "fast" guy did the worst out of the whole group. At least according to the author. Sure, that was just a game, but if you're going to argue for this "general" skill of reflexes that you need for table tennis, surely a person who is good at table tennis reflexes must be good at many different kinds of reflexes. In reality though, that's not necessarily the case at all.

    There's far more to table tennis than just fast reflexes. What you described about anticipation is obviously extremely important, and can make up for having slow reflexes to a large extent. But at a high level, all other things being equal, the guy with faster reflexes has a significant edge.

  • 8 days ago · Quote · #3686

    Elubas

    How much do reflexes even vary? Are there really some people with way faster reflexes than others? I come across people who respond much more quickly to things (in general) than others, but I'm not sure how much of that is physiological and how much of it is just mental, that you know what little things mean and can discriminate and perceive of them. So I just wonder if when we think someone has faster reflexes, we're getting reflexes confused with something else. Or maybe not, but I'm curious about that.

  • 8 days ago · Quote · #3687

    mdinnerspace

    People have two general types of skeletal muscle fibers: slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II). Slow-twitch muscles help enable long-endurance feats such as distance running, while fast-twitch muscles fatigue faster but are used in powerful bursts of movements like sprinting.

    The "twitch" can be measured and is an indicator of a person's potential performance.

    I am a defensive table tennis player. I slow the game down. My anticipation is based on the spin I used to return the ball, the players position at the table, forcing either a fore or backhand or a shot directly at the body. I will often switch hands to make a shot. Something not often seen by the other player.Throw in a drop or a block shot limits the other players choice of return. Knowing their tendencies, strengths and weaknesses is taken into account. In other words, it was a thought "process" with many factors. 1 big factor is the angles of the shots at the table. Driving the ball cross court to a players backhand most likely will produce a limited option of return. I was preparing my next position before returning the present shot. The really good players are able to change things up by for example going down the line in a difficult position, when it would seem the only option was a return across table. My chop was 1 of the best going, floated low over the net deep onto the table. A player needed a darn good loop to make a decent return.

    The speed and agility of today's players is amazing to watch. It Is claimed they are the best conditioned of all athletes. I would not dispute this.

    On the topic of reflexes, some seem to have a greater ability to quickly change from 1 shot to another. By example, being in position, anticipating a forehand return and a backhand becomes the only play. Requires fast hands and feet. It gets measured how fast someone reacts to a starting gun in races, but I don't know if that equates to the table tennis discussion.


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