Many Tactics Verses Concentrating on a few

PatternRecognition

(Since you only have so much time) Is it better to do thousands of tactics quickly, knowing that you'll eventually get the pattern, and you'll get to see thousands of examples. Or is it better to only do a few but concentrate for a longer period of time, and analyze why it is correct.

Or do you try to find a balance with both?

IMBacon

Quality over quantity.

Youre better off doing a few a day.  How many patterns a day do you think you can remember?

BobbyTalparov

If you really want to burn them into your memory, you will do a few new ones a day, but review all previous ones.  For example, assume you have a bank of 100 puzzles of various types.

Week 1:  Solve the first 10 (in random order) each day, aiming for accuracy.

Week 2:  Solve the next 10 (in random order) each day, aiming for accuracy.  Then review the first 10 (in random order) for speed (but looking to get 100% correct in a set time limit).

Repeat for the remaining 80 puzzles.

Weeks 11-12, you should be solving all 100 puzzles for speed (again, aiming for 100% accurate in the time limit).

PatternRecognition

What if I do a thousand a day, by the end of the month I would have done 30,000. It's likely I would cover the same puzzle several times though, right?

JamesColeman

 lol good luck with that

dannyhume
Yes, for simple ones, 1-2 moves deep, doing 30,000 rather quickly for pattern recognition may work. Deeper tactics with more branches, not so sure.
torrubirubi
I tried different apps and books, and by far the best results I had using a rather small pool of puzzles, something about 1200 exercises, and work systematically with them using spaced repetition.
The books in Chessable.com can be reviewed using spaced repetition. It also a great method to learn opening and endgame. As the method is very efficient it is ideal for people,who doesn't have much time to learn.
NMinSixMonths

Both.

IMBacon
torrubirubi wrote:
I tried different apps and books, and by far the best results I had using a rather small pool of puzzles, something about 1200 exercises, and work systematically with them using spaced repetition.
The books in Chessable.com can be reviewed using spaced repetition. It also a great method to learn opening and endgame. As the method is very efficient it is ideal for people,who doesn't have much time to learn.

I have to second this post!  

chessable.com is a fantastic site, with a some really well done books on different phases of the game.  The whole spaced repetition is working well for me.  I am currently working through: Improve Your Chess Tactics: 700 Practical Lessons & Exercises.

I just finished chapter 1 on Deflection (took 3 weeks).  Between that, and reviewing my missed tactics here on Deflection, it is really making a difference.

SeniorPatzer
IMBacon wrote:

Quality over quantity.

Youre better off doing a few a day.  How many patterns a day do you think you can remember?

 

Given how limited my memory is, I agree with this.