Outclassed by a much weaker player??

chessqueengirl

Hello everyone. Yesterday I played 2 games against a friend on a real chess board. She was a much weaker player than me (probably around 800) and I am 1200 in blitz, so I challenged her, expecting to win easily, having won every time before. But she turned the tables upside down on me. I needed some advice on the mistakes that I made.

I don't remember the exact moves in the first game but I was dominating till move 15 having won a free bishop that she blundered, but suddenly realised the strong attack of her queen, knight and pawn on my castled king. And by the time I saw it, there was no refutation. 

I thought she just got lucky so I challenged her to another game. 
I remember this one.



Again I played dynamically and got an early advantage but the thing that frustrated me so much was that how she was able to defend using substandard moves, and avoided any major material loss, but somehow counterattacked me out of a lost position, and threatened to take all the advantage back from me. Thus, I played some forcing moves but found myself totally strangled and finally I blundered my queen.

I don't understand why I lost so badly, though I was trying my best. I usually play online only, so could it mean that I won't perform well on real board? Besides, I felt a bit out of form and sleepy too. How much does one's form have an influence on his/her game? Strangely enough, I played an online game afterwards and won from a 1300 rated opponent in about 12 moves, lol. Thus, it could probably mean that it wasn't me doing wrong but my friend,although at 800, played probably like a 1500 player; just how did she manage to do something like that? Thanks guys for reading it till the end. I would be very grateful for any advice or opinion, thanks.

cellomaster8
Why did you play Bxe6? That was a 3 pt blunder
chessqueengirl

Yes, I should have played 11.Qd1 instead of 11.Bxf6. The bishop was protected by the knight and it couldn't have been captured, but the position got jumbled up in my mind during the game, and I went for a mating attack. That's what I don't understand that why my judgement got so irrational during the game. Was it pressure to lose again or my overconfidence to beat her immediately.frustrated.png

Farm_Hand

Once in an OTB tournament when I was rated 1800, I was paired with an 800 rated player for the first round.

I played normally, as if she were a very strong player. I developed my pieces and castled. She did the same. On move 15 or so the position was pretty equal, but then material was blundered, and I eventually won.

The point of the story is you have to play normally. Don't try to win in 15 moves.

If I were to play Magnus Carlsen, depending on the opening, I might have a totally equal position on move 20... but a game of chess is many moves, and I might play a game losing blunder on move 21... and when there are any problems to solve on the board, definitely I will be outplayed.

So before the game starts, in your mind think about winning on move 40, 50, or 60. Not on move 15 wink.png and remember the moments you'll have a chance to outplay your weaker opponent are when naturally occurring problems arise.

WSama

Yes, I see what happened here. Firstly, it's a blitz game, though I'm not sure how fast it was, still it's blitz, and you played 4.d3 (? for blitz 1200vs800) . Everything else afterwards followed this theme; limiting your movement  (given the time constraints). In the end, you had yourself in a very small square box while your friend looked at you, thinking "what the F chessqueengirl".

CavalryFC

Farm_Hand wrote:

Once in an OTB tournament when I was rated 1800, I was paired with an 800 rated player for the first round.

I played normally, as if she were a very strong player. I developed my pieces and castled. She did the same. On move 15 or so the position was pretty equal, but then material was blundered, and I eventually won.

The point of the story is you have to play normally. Don't try to win in 15 moves.

If I were to play Magnus Carlsen, depending on the opening, I might have a totally equal position on move 20... but a game of chess is many moves, and I might play a game losing blunder on move 21... and when there are any problems to solve on the board, definitely I will be outplayed.

So before the game starts, in your mind think about winning on move 40, 50, or 60. Not on move 15 wink.png and remember the moments you'll have a chance to outplay your weaker opponent are when naturally occurring problems arise.

Farm_Hand wrote: ...The point of the story is you have to play normally. This is really important. Back when I played my first time around, I was about 1400 at the time and playing about a 1050 player. I tried forcing things and ended up in a horrible position. I eventually won but when reviewing with my instructor he was just flabbergasted at some of my logic. It was a lesson learned... I keep seeing players around my rating say they are strong players. Having gone through the beginner stage before, I can safely say we are NOT good players. We can easily blunder a Q in blitz. No matter the competition we need to stay sharp and look for good moves.

DamonevicSmithlov

Well...……… 2 games doesn't show you were out classed. I've lost many games in a row vs much weaker opponents. Just a bad day maybe? Sometimes you might not care as much. Your mind might be elsewhere? There are a lot of reasons to lose to lower rated players over and over. The real test is your overall score and/or rating. And some games are just more important than others. Just have fun if that's what's important.

OPsec1132
You need to follow opening principles and become a much better player before you can start breaking them.

1. Get your king safe
2. develop all of your pieces with a plan, preferably not moving one too often
3.Control the center

If you stick to these rules, you’ll have much better games against weaker players. I often play sidelines and complicated sacrificial attacks against weaker friends for fun and I have been burned before. When I need to beat them I keep it simple and win the long game without taking too much risk
chessqueengirl

Thanks guys. I think it's safe to say that at 1200 we are not as good as we like to think we are. And we should not try to be Mikhail Tal, lol.

B4CK5tABb3R
So do you guys actually set up a board in front of while you play long games? Starring at my phone for hours is not my choice really. So using the phone for these games is a good option? Can it help in real life games?
pfren

The simple 7.Nc3 was probably even stronger than 7.Qf3.

poucin

1200 outclassed by 800?

At this level, everybody can be outclassed by everybody...

DeirdreSkye

    Mayber you overstimated yourself or underestimated her. Maybe she is not "a much weaker player".

    In any case players around 1200 make serious mistakes. Most of the times they lose on their own(suicidal chess is quite common in this level) while the opponent does nothing else except playing simple chess.  It's not about outclassing , it's about reducing your mistakes as much as possible.

If your opponent learned to be a little more careful or happened to be a little more careful that would be enough. Now it's your turn to learn to be a little more careful and outclass her next time. 

    After 10...Ke7 you played 3 moves that were suicidal.

10...Qd1 h6 11.Ne4 instead of 10...Bxg6, 11...Kd1 instead of 11...Ke2 and 

12...Ne4 instead of 12...Kd1 would keep you in the game.

    All 3 mistakes were when you needed to defend and that might mean something.

A lot of  players have a problem with the transition from attacking to defending.

cottonsock
13. Ne4 ! Was needed