"Benefit" of Studying your losses

  • #21

    If your under USCF 2000, study only your losses.

    Studying your opponents' losses is only for the cognoscenti.  But if you're a "purist," please do it, although it will be of limited practical value.  Your choice.

    Simple enough?

  • #22

    Yeah, studying mistakes only helps you learn if you were the one who happened to make them.  One of the mysteries of the universe.

    When I was a kid they used to say stuff like knowing history helps people not repeat the mistakes of the past.  Of course today we know this is silly talk as no one alive today was around 500 years ago making any mistakes.

  • #23

    "The only way to win a game of chess is to make no mistakes"  - Booby Fisher

  • #24

    I remember when Booby said that.

  • #25
    tfulk wrote:

    I remember when Booby said that.

    is that a typo?

  • #26

    I used to get really mad at blunders and was no doubt going to lose against similar rated opponents. Now though, after getting more creative and knowledgeable, I can turn more and more of them into draws and sometimes even wins. It is actually a fun part of the game for me now when I am so unlucky. Creating a fortress from a losing position is very satisfying. It also can teach you a lot and contributes to your chess imagination. This is just based on my experiences though.

  • #27

    Maybe the real answer is not to ever lose then this becomes a mute point

    People may say you can't win every match ... but maybe they don't cheat hard enough - lol

    And yes I know I lose matches before people point that out ... I'm just luring people into a false sense of security! :)

  • #28

    fine - picky :(

  • #29

    very smart statement by booby

  • #30

    In 'Think LIke a Grandmaster' Kotov says that you often learn more from your wins. The reason being that if you lose you naturally focus on the reason for the loss and find the mistakes in your play -  the loss encourages you to look for and then correct them.

    But if you win the mistake can lay hidden and overlooked.

    Nowadays you should run an engine over all your games and relfect on what went wrong in them. Very often the games I win have worse errors in than the ones I lost...

  • #31
    Gunners2004 wrote:

    Recently I've been advised to study all losses I've suffered either OTB or here on chess.com - the reason being "you learn much more from your losses than your wins".

    Although I appreciate the sentiment, studying nothing but where you messed up would affect a player negatively I would think.

    Does anybody agree?

    Studying your own mistakes is important in order to avoid them, but studying how to win is just as important.

  • #32

    maybe the benefit of studying your losses is learning to do your own analysis.

  • #33
    electricpawn wrote:

    maybe the benefit of studying your losses is learning to do your own analysis.

    At classic time controls you should be doing plenty of that in-game. 

    I can certainly see the benefit of following master games or an online coach's scenarios without the crutch on an engine - so you can try to work it out for yourself - but in a game which you have already extensively analysed OTB  I'm not sure I can see why re-analysing it without an engine is an especially good use of time.

  • #34

    Good observations. I guess I would only add the fact that we all have certain tendencies and predilictions that could be modified for the benefit of a beter game.

  • #35

    i don't think i have ever analysed matches

  • #36
    Gunners2004 wrote:

    Recently I've been advised to study all losses I've suffered either OTB or here on chess.com - the reason being "you learn much more from your losses than your wins".

    Although I appreciate the sentiment, studying nothing but where you messed up would affect a player negatively I would think.

    Does anybody agree?

    I have been told the same: That I should record my games and study my losses more intensely than my wins (which sucks, because I gotta study A LOT more since I lose so much haha)... But I agree with the thinking... replaying your lost games (especially if you break out your board and replay move by move) can reveal things you didn't see before, or show you that "ahhh crap, why didn't I play this other move instead" moment.

  • #37

    You just lost a tempo by asking this question. Now go review your games!

or Join

Online Now