Spassky on Fischer (1986)

KoldC45E

Here we are, jumped into this beautiful post about the Greatest World Champion, Fischer. I joinin y`all, give another thought to crush this postgrin.png

What was happened to Fischer... Soviet hegemony on chess bein ruined by Fischer who won the championship. So, soviet thinkin about the way to stop Fischer,,, they use their network in the USA to provoke Fischer N Fischer ate the bait. N the story goes .. N itiz  a  happy end for the red Soviet...until I come.

Just jokinggrin.png

ghost_of_pushwood

unfortunately in a foreign tongue

ghost_of_pushwood

even if nobody else can understand a word

ghost_of_pushwood

I'd say it's more like it sidestepped me. wink.png

blueemu
kamalakanta wrote:

Fischer never recovered from the trauma of growing without his father....

I think that Fischer never recovered from the trauma of winning the world chess championship. He had devoted his whole life to defeating the Russian Machine... and once he succeeded, he felt that he had been deserted by his enemies.

ghost_of_pushwood

Oddly reminiscent of the Chris Farley story.  All he had ever wanted to do was be on SNL.  Once he got there, what then?  And so his compass went haywire.

BonTheCat
Slav2Luv wrote:

Of course by that logic, having climbed Olympus, so to say... RJF would have declined as a player and might not have kept the title. His demands and behaviour suggest he was rusty and somewhat worried by Karpov. But we are speculating, yes?

Of course we're speculating. My point was that had Fischer continued to play after Reykjavik 1972, cetaris paribus, he would have been far ahead of the competition for a good few years. As a basic assumption I don't think that's unreasonable given Fischer's his age and general fighting spirit, never ever taking his foot off the pedal in tournaments and matches even when he was streets ahead of the competition (the Stockholm Interzonal, steamrollering the US champ'ships on various occasions, the Palma de Mallorca Interzonal, the matches against Taimanov and Larsen, and so on).

However, Fischer having practically lived, eaten and slept chess since his early teens, once he achieved his aim, Kasparov's explanation as to why he disappeared virtually without a trace, strikes me as perfectly, not to say highly, plausible. Fischer, not the most stable person to begin with, having invested everything in chess hit with a 'Now what?' moment. He'd already sought religion, more or less out of nowhere (in light of his upbringing).

Morphys-Revenge

this is a great OP. thanks. Spassky is a real gentlemen. 

it was the original fischer-spassky match that got me interested in chess. This game has held my fascination now for 50 years. while my understanding and my rating have increased quite a bit, I still find the game a conundrum. 

 

there is a famous saying that I wish I could remember. it is something like a gnat can dip and an elephant can bathe in it. it relates to the depth and complexity of the game. 

Chess can be enjoyed equally by a rank beginner or an extremely experienced veteran. 

ghost_of_pushwood

Unfortunately, I'm an extremely rank veteran!

msnman

Let's fight now

 

ghost_of_pushwood

Nah, we already did that in '53.

llamonade2
blueemu wrote:
kamalakanta wrote:

Fischer never recovered from the trauma of growing without his father....

I think that Fischer never recovered from the trauma of winning the world chess championship. He had devoted his whole life to defeating the Russian Machine... and once he succeeded, he felt that he had been deserted by his enemies.

That's how it feels to me.

I think it was hard for him to show up because it was almost a lose - lose situation. If he loses the match that would be incredibly negative, but if he wins the match it's even worse.

StinkingHyena
llamonade2 wrote:
blueemu wrote:
kamalakanta wrote:

Fischer never recovered from the trauma of growing without his father....

I think that Fischer never recovered from the trauma of winning the world chess championship. He had devoted his whole life to defeating the Russian Machine... and once he succeeded, he felt that he had been deserted by his enemies.

That's how it feels to me.

I think it was hard for him to show up because it was almost a lose - lose situation. If he loses the match that would be incredibly negative, but if he wins the match it's even worse.

Fischer had massive issues well before that, adulthood, fame and fortune just allowed him to indulge. He was expelled from elementary school for kicking his principal, he once bit another chess player so hard it left permanent marks, I believe Reuben Fine? was asked no less than three times to counsel and help him, several chess players noted his extreme irrationality and anger when he lost as a child. He was on the crazy train (I am being flippant about his mental health, but how respectful can you be to someone who once told a Jewish player that he was reading this great book ‘Mein Kampf’) long before winning the championship. While I certainly recognize his talent and achievements, I don’t see any reason to admire Fischer the man.

msnman

clsrngody...

melvinbluestone
StinkingHyena wrote:
llamonade2 wrote:
blueemu wrote:
kamalakanta wrote:

Fischer never recovered from the trauma of growing without his father....

I think that Fischer never recovered from the trauma of winning the world chess championship. He had devoted his whole life to defeating the Russian Machine... and once he succeeded, he felt that he had been deserted by his enemies.

That's how it feels to me.

I think it was hard for him to show up because it was almost a lose - lose situation. If he loses the match that would be incredibly negative, but if he wins the match it's even worse.

Fischer had massive issues well before that, adulthood, fame and fortune just allowed him to indulge. He was expelled from elementary school for kicking his principal, he once bit another chess player so hard it left permanent marks, I believe Reuben Fine? was asked no less than three times to counsel and help him, several chess players noted his extreme irrationality and anger when he lost as a child. He was on the crazy train (I am being flippant about his mental health, but how respectful can you be to someone who once told a Jewish player that he was reading this great book ‘Mein Kampf’) long before winning the championship. While I certainly recognize his talent and achievements, I don’t see any reason to admire Fischer the man.

   I agree, in principal. But this sort of makes the case for excusing 'Fischer the man'. Perhaps his bizarre behavior as an adult had it's origins in an 'uncounselled childhood', which lays the blame, of course, on everybody else: his mother, his absentee father, his sister, and maybe even Harry Truman and Alfred Kinsey. It's difficult to understand how the guy could be such a great chess player, so logical and precise, and yet so far off the mark on a ton of other stuff. This mystery is likely to intrigue chess players and non-players alike for quite some time to come..... At least until the next Ice Age.

    As for Reuben Fine, considering his own somewhat unstable personal life (five marriages, he was in a contest with Mickey Rooney) and his questionable Freudian approach to chess psychology, maybe it''s better he didn't counsel Fischer as a professional M.D. Besides, Fine looked too much like Harvey Korman to be of any real use to Bobby. wink.png

Image result for reuben fine" < Reuben Fine

ghost_of_pushwood
melvinbluestone wrote:

It's difficult to understand how the guy could be such a great chess player, so logical and precise, and yet so far off the mark on a ton of other stuff.

Seriously?  Jeez Mel, you're coming off a bit naive here...

DrSpudnik

Does he know any chess players?

ghost_of_pushwood

He never have been formally introduced.