Stefan Levitsky vs Frank Marshall, 1912: One of the most beautiful moves ever

  • #1

    This is Stefan Levitsky vs Frank J. Marshall (1912). It is said that after Marshall's last move, 23. ... Qg3!!, the audience literally showered gold pieces on the board!

    What was the exquisiteness of it was that White was offered the Queen in three ways, and Levitsky could not accept it by any means, else White would face an inevitable mate.

    Levitsky resigned.

    23. ... Qg3!! was indeed one of the best moves ever played!

  • #2

    Nice

  • #3

    The "shower of gold" story is totally bogus, but it sure is a beautiful move.

  • #4

    It looks like white will just be down a piece after 24. Qxg3 Ne2+ 25. Kh1 Nxg3+ 26. Kg1 Nxf1 27. gxh3

    Still winning of course, just no mate yet.

  • #5

    awesome!!! Cool

  • #6

    true beauty :)

  • #7
    browni3141 wrote:

    It looks like white will just be down a piece after 24. Qxg3 Ne2+ 25. Kh1 Nxg3+ 26. Kg1 Nxf1 27. gxh3

    Still winning of course, just no mate yet.

    Yes, that's a piece down. But that was too much! Smile

  • #8

  • #9

    Gr8

  • #10

    good move

  • #11

    Smile

  • #12
    Nongxha wrote:

    Marshall 21 move was Rh6.

    I would have played Rxf!!.

    Rxf2???? Blunder, blunder, blunder! Rxf2 = A ROOK DOWN! Smile

  • #13
    Nongxha wrote:

    @strategicplay ahahahaha you cnt c d line o wat dat u r kolng it blunder..

    21.... Rxf

    22.RxR Qa1+!!

    Samjha beta??

    XD Samajh gaya!

    Marshall missed a forced mate! (But forced only if he goes Rxf2) Laughing

  • #14

    The "shower of gold pieces" legend may have come from Polish spectators who wagered on Levitsky - side bets were not uncommon at the time. 

    Levitsky was a strong master, and was the reigning Russian Champion.  He had been competing against the strongest players in Russia and Europe for a dozen years, whereas Marshall was only known for his 4th place at San Sebastian the previous year - and having lost matches to Lasker and Capablanca badly.  So there is reason to believe local players may have bet on Levitsky.

  • #15

    Sorry SP,

    But i couldn't understand this :-

    1.Why the white didn't go for QxQ ?

    24.QXg3..Rxg3

    25.hxg3 would have followed  !

    2.what were the three ways that you said in which the Queen was offered ?

  • #16

    24... Ne2+ wins back the queen with a crushing advantage.

    With 24... Rxg3, black goes from being up a knight to being the exchange down.

  • #17

    Wonderful!

  • #18
    amrita1 wrote:

    Sorry SP,

    But i couldn't understand this :-

    1.Why the white didn't go for QxQ ?

    24.QXg3..Rxg3

    25.hxg3 would have followed  !

    2.what were the three ways that you said in which the Queen was offered ?

    23. ... Qg3!!
    24. Qxg3 Ne2+
    25. Kh1 Nxg3+
    26. Kg1 Nxf1
    27. gxh3

    And now Black is at an advantage.

    The three ways the White Queen was offered:

    24. hxg3 which follows Ne2#.

    24. fxg3 which follows Ne2+ Kh1 Rxf1#.

    24. Qxg3 whose continuation I posted above.

  • #19
    ChristianSoldier007 wrote:

    Here is a complete analysis of every possible move by black that I did a while back of this beautiful move

    http://blog.chess.com/ChristianSoldier007/queen-sacrifices-part-1

    Read it. Nice. Smile

    Please, everyone, read this too!

  • #20

    amritaji ,  even after queenz exchange  black was in one piece advantage ....  white was still loosing anyways  ...so he resigned ......and three ways are  by queen and by two pawns.....

    surely it was great move:) 

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