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Strategy for using my strengths and avoiding my weakness

  • #1

    I have noticed that my weakness is early middlegame. I almost always end up loosing a pawn or a piece (or both) during that stage. But when the middlegame transposes into endgame (that is, when several pawns & pieces has come off the board), i always gain strength and recover my losses. Less clutter and lots of mobility is a blessing.

     

    Therefore i am considering employing a strategy where i am forcing to trade as much material as possible early on avoid my weakness and using my strength. Is this a good idea?

  • #2

        The worst thing you can do in chess is trying to hide your deficciencies instead of trying to fix them.You must do exactly the opposite.

        If you are indeed good in endgames(I haven't seen any of your games to verify that but I won't doubt it) it's a blessing.It means you are very talented.But how does it help?It allows you to turn even a minimal middlegame advantage to a favorable/winning endgame.But how will you do that if there is no advantage in the middlegame?Yes , you are able to win equal endgames right now but will you be able to win them later , against better opponents?

         Against better oponents you will need something concrete to win the position and you have to create it in the middlegame.If you are unable to do that then your talent in endgame will be wasted.

         Despite all these , playing as many endgames as possible is extremely beneficial.Dvoretsky once asked to describe with 10 words or less the fastest way for one to reach 2200 and he answered :

    "Trade down and learn to play the endgame."

        But  avoiding to fix your weaknesses is hardly a good idea.The point in playing a lot of endgames is to understand the good and the bad exchanges(the most critical  concept in chess).If you just do bad exchanges without learning anything and you win the endgame because of the mistakes your opponents do , then all this is pointless. 

  • #3
    Scotch Game perhaps?

    But if you want to get good, you shouldn't be avoiding your weakness ... You should fix it and you'll become a much better chess player.
  • #4
    Yep. Try to look for holes in your opponent's position and exploit them, but while doing that, don't forget your own holes or you'll be at the receiving end of the stick.
  • #5

    kaukasar wrote:

    I have noticed that my weakness is early middlegame. I almost always end up loosing a pawn or a piece (or both) during that stage. But when the middlegame transposes into endgame (that is, when several pawns & pieces has come off the board), i always gain strength and recover my losses. Less clutter and lots of mobility is a blessing.

     

    Therefore i am considering employing a strategy where i am forcing to trade as much material as possible early on avoid my weakness and using my strength. Is this a good idea?

    no it is not a good idea you should play sharp openings so that even if you're a pawn down you still have dynamic chances
  • #6

    If you don't like the middlegames you are reaching, it might be a good idea to try other openings. Pick openings that lead to middlegames (and ultimately endgames) that suit your style. 

  • #7

    Thanks for the feedback. I have checked out the scotch game and i will definitely try it out next time i play white! Meanwhile i'll keep doing opening lessons on this site to improve.

  • #8

    It is often said that openings aren't really where you should dedicate too much time when you're setting out in chess. Some GMs have even suggested not to bother until you're around 2000 ELO. Learn one or two basics, sure, but don't get bogged down in opening theory. Learn the principles of the opening rather than memorise moves.

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