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teaching my kids

  • #21
    catkeson wrote:

    Best way to learn is have them play.   Teach them the rules and play a couple games with them where you are just fixing illegal moves/showing them how to play.  Get them chess.com accounts and put on the auto-disable chat setting on.   When you make a new account you have the option to specify your experience level so your initial rating is appropriate.  Set them up as the lowest one because they are going to be really bad at first.  Once a day get both of them together and play a 30 minute game with them.  Try to let them figure out the moves but point stuff out as you go along.  After they get a decent grasp of things set them up with their own accounts and have them play 10 minute games.  They will probably start off < 600 blitz but will improve the more they play.  If they have a knack for the game they should be rated about 1000 after 1000 games played.  The most important thing though is whether or not they like it.  If they don't really like it don't have them play because it will be  a waste of time.  You have to really like the game to get good.  

          My niece is 7 and I tried exactly that.The game was a mess of unreasonable clueless moves.She didn't learn anything.Plus I told her " the goal is to checkmate" and she asked me "how will I do that?".How to answer that to  a 7 year old kid that still doesn't know the moves and is eager to play have fun and win?Every move was a nonsese and I had to shut up because the more I explained ,the more she were bored. 

         In endgame the goal and the way to reach it is clear.Kids need clear goals that can understand.32 unknown pieces on the board and an unclear goal(in the initial position checkmate is only a distant vision , you have to do a lot of things before you achieve it) are not helping. 

  • #22
    DeirdreSkye wrote:
    catkeson wrote:

    Best way to learn is have them play.   Teach them the rules and play a couple games with them where you are just fixing illegal moves/showing them how to play.  Get them chess.com accounts and put on the auto-disable chat setting on.   When you make a new account you have the option to specify your experience level so your initial rating is appropriate.  Set them up as the lowest one because they are going to be really bad at first.  Once a day get both of them together and play a 30 minute game with them.  Try to let them figure out the moves but point stuff out as you go along.  After they get a decent grasp of things set them up with their own accounts and have them play 10 minute games.  They will probably start off < 600 blitz but will improve the more they play.  If they have a knack for the game they should be rated about 1000 after 1000 games played.  The most important thing though is whether or not they like it.  If they don't really like it don't have them play because it will be  a waste of time.  You have to really like the game to get good.  

          My niece is 7 and I tried exactly that.The game was a mess of unreasonable clueless moves.She didn't learn anything.Plus I told her " the goal is to checkmate" and she asked me "how will I do that?".How to answer that to  a 7 year old kid that still doesn't know the moves and is eager to play have fun and win?Every move was a nonsese and I had to shut up because the more I explained ,the more she were bored. 

         In endgame the goal and the way to reach it is clear.Kids need clear goals that can understand.32 unknown pieces on the board and an unclear goal(in the initial position checkmate is only a distant vision , you have to do a lot of things before you achieve it) are not helping. 

     

    Not all kids are like that.  It's worth a shot on your twins.  If they don't like it now try again in a couple years when there is more going on upstairs lol.  I have about 15 cousins below the age of 10 and about three of them demonstrated logical thinking and an interest in the game.

  • #23
    catkeson wrote:

    Best way to learn is have them play.   Teach them the rules and play a couple games with them where you are just fixing illegal moves/showing them how to play.  Get them chess.com accounts and put on the auto-disable chat setting on.   When you make a new account you have the option to specify your experience level so your initial rating is appropriate.  Set them up as the lowest one because they are going to be really bad at first.  Once a day get both of them together and play a 30 minute game with them.  Try to let them figure out the moves but point stuff out as you go along.  After they get a decent grasp of things set them up with their own accounts and have them play 10 minute games.  They will probably start off < 600 blitz but will improve the more they play.  If they have a knack for the game they should be rated about 1000 after 1000 games played.  Make sure they are doing tactics trainer too.  5 free puzzles a day and the puzzles will match to their skill level pretty quickly.  The most important thing though is whether or not they like it.  If they don't really like it don't have them play because it will be  a waste of time.  You have to really like the game to get good.   

    Don't waste your money on a coach.  There are thousands of excellent chess lectures online and chess books.  Have them watch John Bartholomew's fundamentals of chess or St Louis chess center lecture videos.  In my experience though the number one best way to improve is to play.  You are not going to learn from someone telling you how you should play.  You must internalize it through lots of experience.  I've given chess advice to countless people and don't think I've ever seen someone actually put my advice into their play.  I showed one guy a pattern for mating with a rook and a king like 5 times and would just be watching in agony as he forgot everything I told him every time he ended up in that situation in a game.  It's just so hard to use that part of your brain when there is time pressure and nervousness involved.  Things can seem so straightforward in practice but are so difficult in a game.  You really need to learn things in game circumstances to retain them.  

    This sound reasonable. When I give chess lessons for beginners I also try to get them play as quick as possible. If they play me, I give them a lot of material to make it sure they will win the game. And if I win the material back, I turn the board and let them play my side, until they checkmate me. Slowly they get confident, so I give less material. Another funny way is if I play a dubious line, for example QGA trying to hold the pawn and losing a figure. So they have already an idea of what is sound and what not in the opening.

  • #24
    DeirdreSkye wrote:
    catkeson wrote:

    Best way to learn is have them play.   Teach them the rules and play a couple games with them where you are just fixing illegal moves/showing them how to play.  Get them chess.com accounts and put on the auto-disable chat setting on.   When you make a new account you have the option to specify your experience level so your initial rating is appropriate.  Set them up as the lowest one because they are going to be really bad at first.  Once a day get both of them together and play a 30 minute game with them.  Try to let them figure out the moves but point stuff out as you go along.  After they get a decent grasp of things set them up with their own accounts and have them play 10 minute games.  They will probably start off < 600 blitz but will improve the more they play.  If they have a knack for the game they should be rated about 1000 after 1000 games played.  The most important thing though is whether or not they like it.  If they don't really like it don't have them play because it will be  a waste of time.  You have to really like the game to get good.  

          My niece is 7 and I tried exactly that.The game was a mess of unreasonable clueless moves.She didn't learn anything.Plus I told her " the goal is to checkmate" and she asked me "how will I do that?".How to answer that to  a 7 year old kid that still doesn't know the moves and is eager to play have fun and win?Every move was a nonsese and I had to shut up because the more I explained ,the more she were bored. 

         In endgame the goal and the way to reach it is clear.Kids need clear goals that can understand.32 unknown pieces on the board and an unclear goal(in the initial position checkmate is only a distant vision , you have to do a lot of things before you achieve it) are not helping. 

    Yeah, it's hard.

    I taught some kids. First lesson was how to checkmate with two rooks, and then Q+K vs K.

    So then they play and some of the games start with these (or similar) moves

    Followed by 100+ movse of no one capturing anything.

    I pointed out that with no way for pawns to capture each other, it's going to be a draw, but they said they agreed before the game to always use this opening.

    Which is fine, they're having fun, but when they do the same next week, and the week after that...

    Yeah, basically either the kid has to like chess enough to accept your advice, or the parents have to be willing to make them learn/practice even if the kid's not interested.

  • #25

    poodle, really funny, I should try this opening! 

  • #26

    St Louis lectures? en passant? QGA? sound openings? coaching? Tactics trainer ???!!!???

     

    They don't even know the horsey thing moves! They're 7, they're gonna get bored super easily, they're gonna wanna mess about, have fun, dive straight into playing, it's good to introduce them to the game but who knows how they're going to take to it if at all. Chesskid is a pretty sensible option though.

     

     

  • #27

    I don’t think these guys care about that😉

    ‘Checkmate’ code for something?

  • #28
  • #29

     Yes just make chess fun for them and make sure they really know how to move the pieces, but the most important thing is make them love chess, the rest is not that important

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