x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

What if someone's first move is a3

  • #61
    poucin wrote:

    ok but there is no point to go for a grunfeld reverse where a3 is useless.

    U have to find a way to get a variation where control of b4 can be important. For example, someone talked about Benko gambit reversed...>>>>

    The Grunfeld is my personal favourite reversed QP opening for white. It seems to work far better than for instance, a reversed QGA. However, as you suggest, a3 is fairly useless here, because white needs to use the extra move to attack the centre.

    Would a reversed Benko even be a gambit if all black needs to do, as black, is to equalise?

     

  • #62
    restraint a écrit :

    a3 has only one logical followup: b4.  If black plays a5 or c5, your idea is toast.  a4 is a much better opening move because it cant be directly circumvented immediately.  

    Pretty wrong.

    Surprising but the idea of a3 is not to continue with b4...

  • #63
    RubenHogenhout a écrit :
    poucin schreef:

    ok but there is no point to go for a grunfeld reverse where a3 is useless.

    U have to find a way to get a variation where control of b4 can be important. For example, someone talked about Benko gambit reversed...

     

    So you suggests  1.a3 c5 2.Nf3 d5  and then   3.c4!?  d4 4.b4   or something?

     

     

    Something like that yes.

    But any system where b4 can be good at some point (and not at move 2, who would like to play a Sokolsky ).

    Benoni, Benko, KI( pointed out above), and i guess we can find other systems.

  • #64

    There is recent book out titled Play 1...d6 Against Everything. It seems to me a person could use 1 a3 followed by 2 d3 as white, use 1...d6 as black, and therefore have their entire repertoire in that one book. Sounds pretty good huh. However, the book's repertoire is based on the Philidor and Old Indian, so you have to be willing to play rope a dope and count on getting your punches in later. 

  • #65
    pipxr wrote:

    makes no sense

    It takes away the b4 square from black's king bishop, and likely signals a future a3-b4 pawn structure.

    Black can fianchetto his king bishop to put it on a strong diagonal.

     

  • #66
    sierkeri wrote:

    the andersons opening is a decent difficulty to counter, but one wrong move could get your important pieces wiped

     true, but it'll take a long while to see that your trapped?

Top

Online Now