What is the most SURPRISING incident happen with you while playing OTB tourney?

  • #321

    <9theagle> I'm probably close to USCF 2200 level - and I can tell you, that if I met a USCF 1400 in a tourney, who was otherwise performing like a 1400 (not some underrated whiz kid), and accidentally went down a piece rather early in the game - I would never accept a draw offer from  him, but would most probably win the game - probably win nine times out of ten from such a position. 

    Not because he would make accidental blunders - although he will make quite many of them - but just because he doesn't know what to do with his pieces, in comparison to my know-how. 

    I wouldn't expect to win up a piece when playing a GM in tournament time controls, and wouldn't offer him a draw either. I would play it out though - if nothing else, then for the learning experience. 

  • #322
    solskytz wrote:

    I'm probably close to USCF 2200 level - and I can tell you, that if I met a USCF 1400 in a tourney, who was otherwise performing like a 1400 (not some underrated whiz kid), and accidentally went down a piece rather early in the game - I would never accept a draw offer from  him, but would most probably win the game - probably win nine times out of ten from such a position. 

    Not because he would make accidental blunders - although he will make quite many of them - but just because he doesn't know what to do with his pieces, in comparison to my know-how. 

    I wouldn't expect to win up a piece when playing a GM in tournament time controls, and wouldn't offer him a draw either. I would play it out though - if nothing else, then for the learning experience. 

    So you're agreeing with me? I would still expect to win against someone playing at a level several hundred points lower than me even if I blundered a piece. I believe the argument was that if the higher rated person offered the draw, it would not be unreasonable for the lower rated person to accept. I probably wouldn't take the draw from either end unless I was in time trouble, but I think the lower player (up a piece) would be happier with a draw than the higher player.

  • #323

    <9thEagle>

     

    Sure. A piece disadvantage (in a complex position with many pieces on the board) is totally unimportant when playing someone 500 points lower than you. 

    I suppose it begins to have some importance when the lower-rated player is at least 1900 USCF, and it probably equalizes the chances, or close to that, when the weaker player is rated about 2200 USCF. 

  • #324
    solskytz wrote:

     

     

    Sure. A piece disadvantage (in a complex position with many pieces on the board) is totally unimportant when playing someone 500 points lower than you. 

    I suppose it begins to have some importance when the lower-rated player is at least 1900 USCF, and it probably equalizes the chances, or close to that, when the weaker player is rated about 2200 USCF. 

    A piece advantage with no compensation? I'd expect to beat Carlsen the majority of the time, let alone an average GM. Would not like my chances down a piece to an 1800 player, but would against a 1500 (800 point difference) if I had some kind of reasonable play. Assuming an OTB game and not blitz, of course.

  • #325

    well, clearly our opinions and experiences differ...

    I remember a game by Capablanca, where he lost a piece early on against another top 20 player. He did win in the end - but he made life very hard for that master, and it was very easy to imagine a different result. Their difference in playing strength was far from 500 elo points. 

    And I've seen too many examples of people managing to escape a piece-down game with adversaries only 150-200 points below them. 

    I think that you have chosen a particularly elusive opponent to demonstrate your piece-up winning abilities, in Carlsen. Maybe if you said Ivanchuk... or Van Vely... but I do like your attitude as expressed here, and from watching your profile, I have every reason to believe that you'll climb the elo ladder much further. 

    Should you have that situation against someone with 1800 USCF, I suppose that you would feel uncomfortable... you would have imagined a million horrible scenarios, that would be for the most part totally invisible to your opponent, who would know that 'the win is there somewhere'...

    Then you would naturally fend off his naive attempts to convert, slowly break down his conviction in winning, a couple of wrong moves would slip into his play, he will give you some active play, perhaps a pawn or two, an open line or two, an outpost... suddenly you have compensation for the piece! And the best is yet to come :-)

  • #326
    BetweenTheWheels wrote:
    Suvel_Karmarkar wrote:

    I had a water bottle next to be and my opponent said that i wasnt allowed to have a water bottle, it was a form of cheating??? WTH

    so we called the TD and he settled it and my opponent lost 5 min.

    I remember reading a story about Bobby Fischer accusing the Russians of helping Spassky by signaling him with different colored drinks. One color might signal, "This line has been known to favor White" while another color might signal, "He's played a novelty that has been refuted in practice." So if someone brought you the water, his accusation isn't entirely baseless.

    If his move was a novelty, how could it have been refuted in practice? lol Also, as someone else pointed out, the accusation was made by Korchnoi against Karpov.

  • #327

    In the most recent Supernationals, for most of the tournament, the top players were on the same boards, sitting next to each other every round. Well, the kid that won the K-6 blitz tournament which took place before the actual tournament was next to me for the entire time. Before one of the rounds (the 2nd, I believe) they gave out the trophies for all the blitz tournaments, and when they awarded 1st place for the K-6 blitz and he went up to collect this absolutely monstrous trophy, his opponent's eyes bulged so wide and looked to be extremely intimidated. Also, instead of taking the trophy out of the room, he left it right behind him for the entire game, letting the opponent stare at it! LOL

    ---------------------

    Later in that same tournament, the same person was in heated time pressure, as was his opponent. The opponent doesn't realize that his king is in check, and moves another piece instead. An arbiter is called over and he gets 2 minutes added to his time. The opponent takes back his move and the game continues. Instead of finding a legal move, the opponent MAKES HIS SECOND ILLEGAL MOVE IN A ROW by moving his king, but it was still in check! They both share a good laugh and he doesn't even bother to add 2 more minutes to his clock, and instead the game fizzles out to a draw in a few more moves.

  • #328

    In a Fide Rated tournament , it was a similar kind of situation , where I was with white pieces and my opponent was in hopeless situation , I thought he would resign after losing his queen but he kept on playing after rook loss etc , after every capture I expected him to resign but he didn't at last when the situation was like this (board) he moved his bishop to somewhere and stood up opened his palm for handshake , I finally took a relief that he is resigning , but to my horror he wrote draw 1/2 - 1/2 points in the sheet , I questioned then he said that he had offered draw and I have accepted it now its final after handshake :P , the win was important for me so I called the arbitar who asked me if I had accepted the draw , I questioned him , If he could have accepted draw in the position by pointing towards board . Arbitar had a close look at the board and after giving a big grin he asked my opponent to play on . My opponent played until I mated him.

  • #329

    That is hilarious Sandeep, the nerve of some people.

  • #330

    I've heard handshake stories before. It's definitely something to be careful about.

  • #331

    I was once doing well in an over-the-board tournament and then paired with well known Chicago master, Dr Eugene Martinovsky. We had each won our first 3 games.

    I was playing Black and on about the 11th move had a slight advantage and Dr. Martinovsky offered a draw.

    I knew that if someone offers a draw early in the game, he thought he had the worse of it.

    So, I turned down his offer of a draw. [he was rated about 2350]

     About 1/2 hour later, I resigned. 

  • #332

    once i was playing an person in an otb tournament that otb player was mated by me up to 10 times every time he took it back and said i willl kill you if you call the arbiter. he was twice as big as me that time and i also was a sissy that time. at last i lost my temper and called the arbiter. WHILE i was calling the arbiter he changed the position of the peices.the game was agreed to a draw.

  • #333
    ponz111 wrote:

    I was once doing well in an over-the-board tournament and then paired with well known Chicago master, Dr Eugene Martinovsky. We had each won our first 3 games.

    I was playing Black and on about the 11th move had a slight advantage and Dr. Martinovsky offered a draw.

    I knew that if someone offers a draw early in the game, he thought he had the worse of it.

    So, I turned down his offer of a draw. [he was rated about 2350]

     About 1/2 hour later, I resigned. 

    surprise!

  • #334

    I once played in a game where I forgot whose turn it was (I'm not very good at chess XD) and ended up sitting there for 10 minutes, waiting for something to happen before it hit me. Then I asked the opponent, and he was pretty empathetic about it, I moved and the game resumed XD 

  • #335

    I didn't witness this myself, but I heard about it from a tournament director. There were these 2 kids playing (for the drama, let's say they're playing for 1st place in the top section at the last round) and they're down to seconds on their clocks (this was before time delay was in general use). So they're playing, and one kid makes his move and hits the table beside the clock. The other kid instantly moves, but gets a penalty for an illegal move because his opponent had not yet completed his move!

  • #336

    I was playing in the major open in British Championship two years ago when a player on a neigbouring board had a heart attack. The arbiters announced to the hall that we could all stop playing but my opponent and I just carried on playing. The gentleman in question apparently was OK eventually.

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