When you play your kids do you ever let them win? How often.

wollyhood

I really want them to keep playing primarily. More games and chess discussions for me. Also it will be something enduring for them when all the videogames become too expensive and bad for them.

Drawgood
I am not trying to say video games are good for anybody. I play them myself as a 35 year old. But it may be incorrect to think that chess would significantly be better. If you want the kids to have something to talk about with other kids they might not find many kids who play chess. I also think it is a myth that chess necessarily is good for kids.
wollyhood

Hmm very interesting points posters. I think my daughter has lost one and won one at school, she has a tricky personality, it took us a couple of years to get comfortable at losing at snakes and ladders lol.

I don't mean letting them win at home all the time, I just mean letting them win or have a take back one in every X amount of games.

Not really sure about your spud analogy there.

Drawgood I play them a bit also, but my son is quite dejected about fortnight now, they have all become too proprietary / expensive and at least with chess they can play all the family members at something. Also it will be something that they can do online at any time, and in any country, and with any age of people. Especially when they are old themselves.

Kiwis probably aren't so competitive at young ages which might be good, social aspects of sports are usually encouraged as nearly as important as the games. In my experience though I haven't been to any NZ chess clubs yet but we are looking for ones with convenient times. There's only two near my "city" xD

bong711

I don't believe in giving kids fake wins.in chess. I prefer giving odds like queen odds. If they start winning more, reduce to rook odds, knight odds and so on.

StartAfresh

in my family we never let other win just to bolster his/her confidence, because we considered that it is fake and if you feel that you have been let to win it does not make it enjoyable. Nevertheless, here is an interesting interview by Hikaru, who said that when he was a kid a FIDE master let him win and it helped him: https://www.chess.com/article/view/hikaru-nakamura-interview-cause-of-a-chess-boom

So sometimes, it can be helpful apparently.

wollyhood
bong711 wrote:

I don't believe in giving kids fake wins.in chess. I prefer giving odds like queen odds. If they start winning more, reduce to rook odds, knight odds and so on.

Nice thanks. Thankfully we found that my son can beat me at blitz at least so that's pretty real. My daughter is going to be tricky. I think the 3 player chess will be good as we usually have mass hilarity when we play board games all together.

StartAfresh Thanks for the post about Hikaru I will read that soon. To everyone that believes in not giving games, do all your kids still play?

I agree that never experiencing failure til they get older is bad for people in general for sure.

bong711

Russian Checkers is a nice game to introduce to kids. Give them 4 pawns odds at start. Later 3, 2 ,1 and equal play at last.

molo1

PotatoChampion wrote:

What happens when they win and then go to school and play? Those parents who train their child will eventually beat your child. Then, their confidence will crumble. But figure, for every win they get 25 cents towards a sack of potatoes. After they earn enough to pay for a sack of potatoes, you get them a potato peeler. Then tell them, "This is the best food on the planet. Now, start peeling my child."

hehehehehehe

madratter7

What I did when I played my kids is play with a clock. That way I could give them time odds. They would get 5 minutes, I would start at some value (say 1 minute) and if they won, I got more time. If they lost, I got less time. That way, it kept things competitive for them, they were playing the real game, and if they won, they rightly felt a sense of achievement, knowing I had tried.

They adapted to using a clock very easily despite starting young.

congrandolor

I'm starting teaching chess to my nephew (4 years). Just the way the pieces move by now (but not «special» moves like castle and en passant yet). I put my pieces en prise on purpose, then I fake surprise expression: «Ohh, look, your bishop can take my knight!». I'm waiting for him to learn enough to start crushing him relentlessly.

wollyhood
madratter7 wrote:

What I did when I played my kids is play with a clock. That way I could give them time odds. They would get 5 minutes, I would start at some value (say 1 minute) and if they won, I got more time. If they lost, I got less time. That way, it kept things competitive for them, they were playing the real game, and if they won, they rightly felt a sense of achievement, knowing I had tried.

They adapted to using a clock very easily despite starting young.

That seems excellent as they would gain satisfaction as they need less time, and there's an inherent unsaid challenge to catch up to you. Plus less stress with clocks if they ever played tournies. I can see how that would work seamlessly with the queen odds.

lol @congrandolor , such fun. Luckily I make a few blunders especially after a couple of evening drinks. Handy that the only animal is like a unicorn, and our set is a bit  kidproof / indestructible :