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Why I stopped caring about chess

  • #1

    The answer is easy. I simply do not want to sustain me and my wife by coaching 5 year old kids and charging way too much on dumb lessons about forks. Tell me dear chess.com user, why did you stop caring about chess?

  • #2

    I stopped caring about chess when I realized that chess had stopped caring about me.

  • #3

    The reason is obvious.

     

  • #4

    Well, OP, you're here! So I'm not sure I buy your story that you quit caring about chess. But if you mean that you quit caring about chess as a career, then I fully understand you. Like many a talented musician, writer, or artist, you are eventually faced with the fact that being very good at something is not enough is a field where even the almost-great struggle to make a living

  • #5

         Perhaps you just stopped caring about coaching,don't blame you! I'llnever stop caring because when I play a game or try to solve a puzzle, I,m in a world of  mt own. Escapism is what I think they call it.

  • #6

        Sorry for  the typo. 

  • #7

    As a 70 year old retiree, teaching Chess to kids is rewarding to see that they are learning (and, more importantly, having fun) in addition to making more money per hour than I did as a machinist. Of course I`m collecting Social Security and, quite frankly, I am benefitting in addition to a very nice inheritance. I know very talented musicians and tennis players  who have to work "9 to 5" jobs to survive as they have not gotten that "big break" (and probably never will!) and teaching alone just simply will not even come close to paying the bills. I guess that I am echoing the observations of mickynj as well.

  • #8

    Mostly because my billiards club is a lot more fun and outgoing than the chess club I tried. I'll never be more than mediocre at either game so I'd rather invest my spare time in the game I have more fun playing. It's rather hard to play billiards on the go though, so I'll keep playing a few daily games on the app.

  • #9

    They are young and well built, they have another thirty years ahead of them. So they don't hurry, they take their time, and they are quite right. Once they have been to bed together, they will have to find something else to conceal the enormous absurdity of their existence.
    JEAN-PAUL SARTRE,

    “J'existe, c'est tout.”
    Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea


    “It is the reflection of my face. Often in these lost days I study it: I can understand nothing of this face. The faces of others have some sense, some direction. Not mine. I cannot even decide whether it is handsome or ugly. I think it is ugly because I have been told so. But it doesn't strike me. At heart, I am even shocked that anyone can attribute qualities of this kind to it, as if you called a clod of earth or a block of stone beautiful or ugly.”
    Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea


    “I marvel at these young people: drinking their coffee, they tell clear, plausible stories. If they are asked what they did yesterday, they aren't embarrassed: they bring you up to date in a few words. If I were in their place, I'd fall all over myself.”
    ?Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

    We forfeit three-quarters of ourselves in order to be like other people.
    Arthur Schopenhauer

  • #10
    BronsteinPawn wrote:

    The answer is easy. I simply do not want to sustain me and my wife by coaching 5 year old kids and charging way too much on dumb lessons about forks. Tell me dear chess.com user, why did you stop caring about chess?

    I didnt stop caring, i stopped taking it so serious. Now i study what i want, when i want, how i want.  The teaching i do, i do for free.

  • #11
    BronsteinPawn wrote:

    The answer is easy. I simply do not want to sustain me and my wife by coaching 5 year old kids and charging way too much on dumb lessons about forks. Tell me dear chess.com user, why did you stop caring about chess?

    at my age it is not important to take it seriously so i do not take it seriously. 

  • #12
    patzer_sayantan wrote:
    BronsteinPawn wrote:

    The answer is easy. I simply do not want to sustain me and my wife by coaching 5 year old kids and charging way too much on dumb lessons about forks. Tell me dear chess.com user, why did you stop caring about chess?

    at my age it is not important to take it seriously so i do not take it seriously. 

    Well said!

  • #13
    You’ll feel a lot better once you realize the world doesn’t owe you a living.
  • #14
    I stopped caring when I looked around and saw a bunch of people hooked on their respective rating. I play for fun and never study.
  • #15

    I stopped caring when I discovered Table tennis

  • #16

    when I stopped caring, my rating went up by 300 elo points in 6 mos!

  • #17

    I can understand not caring about teaching chess for a living.  It's usually not a way to earn a decent living.

    My first piano teacher wanted to be a full-time musician but realized its hard to earn a living that way. So he majored in college in electronics, got a job in that field where he could retire with a pension with health insurance in 20 years, then turned to playing and teaching music with that pension and health insurance providing a safety net if he hit a bad patch in terms of music earnings.

    Another musician, who is the head of the Woodwinds Department at the world-class Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University (my logo shows me playing Chopin in the ACE Recital there), also majored in electrical engineering as well as music.  He taught jazz sax to my nephew. His name is Ian Sims and he's an up-and-coming modern jazz saxophonist.  If, for some reason, he doesn't do well in music, he has his other degree to fall back on.

  • #18
    Am I the only one on this thread who still cares a little bit about chess then?
  • #19

    Thanks for sharing your stories guys. Makes me feel better to know I am not the only unworthy human failure that took something seriously and gave up like a scared kid.

  • #20
    MickinMD wrote:

    I can understand not caring about teaching chess for a living.  It's usually not a way to earn a decent living.

    My first piano teacher wanted to be a full-time musician but realized its hard to earn a living that way. So he majored in college in electronics, got a job in that field where he could retire with a pension with health insurance in 20 years, then turned to playing and teaching music with that pension and health insurance providing a safety net if he hit a bad patch in terms of music earnings.

    Another musician, who is the head of the Woodwinds Department at the world-class Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University (my logo shows me playing Chopin in the ACE Recital there), also majored in electrical engineering as well as music.  He taught jazz sax to my nephew. His name is Ian Sims and he's an up-and-coming modern jazz saxophonist.  If, for some reason, he doesn't do well in music, he has his other degree to fall back on.

    Sir I promised to myself I would be a GM. 1 year ago when my rating was skyrocketing I saw ,myself in 12 years with a 2487 rating. Now I either have to accept that I was a dumb innocent human being back then which is hard or accept that I gave up on a hard yet possible to meet goal. 

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