Will you analyze the games you won??

  • #1

    Im just curious. Normally i wont even bother analyze any games of mine . I know this is isnt good but im just plain lazy :P

  • #2

    Well, being lazy isn't good.

  • #3

    Put that on a resume and I am sure there will be a clear response.

  • #4

    Are you kidding?

    I LOVE to analyze my wins, although I usually find better moves for both sides, and sometimes that my "brilliant" ideas weren't so much.  Even so, it's fun to get back to the moment, the excitement, recall the experience.  And sometimes I even get to say of my move, "Yeah, that was a good one."

    I LEARN far more by analyzing my losses.

  • #5

    I've just been going back over all my USCF games (entering them into a database).  Eek!  Some real depressing crapola in there.  I guess I could take heart with the notion that now at least I'm able to see all the goofiness and mistakes...somehow though it doesn't seem to work out that way.

  • #6

    Doing nothing doesn't help you to improve your chess skills. However, not analysing your games and know your mistakes doesn't improve chess skills also.

    When analysing my games (Won): I always amazed by every beautiful move I made, sacrificing pieces to mate or positional advantage etc.

    When I analyse a (Lose) game: I we're also amazed by what am I thinking in that time playing a game, and I just take a excuse saying "This is not my day" LOL

  • #7

    Would it be more better with no loses? haha! Congratulations my friend.

  • #8

    At a tournament ages ago, two players were going over their game for some time. When they finished & got up, one said, "I sure learned a lot. But howcome I never learn anything from my wins?" I came back with, "The only thing you learn from your wins is what a big genius you are."

    Laughs galore, but it was true.

  • #9

    You should analyse all your games, win lose or draw. It's the best way to improve by far.

  • #10

    I analyze both my won and lost games. Because in my wins, I don't win because I played perfect, it is because my opponent played less accurate then me. There are usually lots of lessons to learn from in those games you think you played brilliantly. There is a hidden defensive resource or a tactical shot, or a faster way to finish the game.

  • #11
    Samsch wrote:
    Estragon wrote:

    Are you kidding?

    I LOVE to analyze my wins, although I usually find better moves for both sides, and sometimes that my "brilliant" ideas weren't so much.  Even so, it's fun to get back to the moment, the excitement, recall the experience.  And sometimes I even get to say of my move, "Yeah, that was a good one."

    I LEARN far more by analyzing my losses.

    +1

    I do that to, just not at your level :)

    +1 for Estragon and +1 for Daeru

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