x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

Would you play chess without a clock ?

  • #1

    ?

  • #2
    yes, I would. and I do very often; playing casual OTB games. Don't think I'd play w/o clock online though -- online, seems no fun w/o time control.
  • #3

    Oh sorry I'm talking about OTB only

  • #4

    No. I downloaded chess clock from Google Play in case I might get to play OTB. I used to play with/o it when I was in high school (1994). I played in a joke tourney with infinite time setting. Haha. But I think we were just lazy to strain our brain too much. I get to play two or three games in one day. I only got my interest in chess back in 2011.

  • #5

    yes

  • #6

    Against a young, nude Raquel Welch?  Sure I would!

  • #7

    Yes. A game can last from 30 minutes to 2 hours though. My longest being 4 hours against my father.

  • #8

    every day

     

  • #9

    Yes, of course! I, just like some other people they think really slow, so we always run out time.

  • #10
    Yes,I love clocks especially blitz
  • #11

    Some games in the 1400s went on for 14 hours! Losing players would try and tire out their opponent. I definitely think clocks are the best way to play it.

  • #12
    Why not?
  • #13
    I play casual OTB games without a clock.
  • #14

    Years ago when I was a member of a chess club, clocks were always used even in casual games.  I wouldn't want to play without one.  First, having a time control limits the duration of the game.  Second, I think it's an important part of the game for "good" players.  It's not enough to come up with the right move eventually; you've got to come up with it in a timely manner.  Yeah, I know some think a player isn't "good" unless he's rated at least 2000 or something but I disagree.  I would bet most people who play chess have never played a rated game.  They're not even good enough to know they're bad.  We've all been there.  You ask, "Do you play chess?"  He answers, "Yeah, and I'm good.  I haven't lost a game in a couple of years."  He thinks he's good because Uncle Bill is even worse.  What I mean by "good" player is one who has at least a working understanding of opening, middle game and endgame theory; is able to see at least simple combinations and at least occasionally makes very good moves; has belonged to a chess club and or played in tournaments, and although he lacks the skill to produce a brilliancy himself, he has enough knowledge to understand and appreciate one when he sees it. 

  • #15

    #15

    Second, I think it's an important part of the game for "good" players. It's not enough to come up with the right move eventually; you've got to come up with it in a timely manner.

    That's very interesting, as some people might debate that, saying time is just a thought of a help line for weak player who rely on it and it takes true master to play without any help line or any distractions as you wish, just pure battle of combat . Strongest will will . Just like UFC in 1990s wheres no rules or weight category , no gloves etc just pure heart to heart , best wins no distructions, no time nor ref etc...

  • #16

    I disagree with those people.  I don't know why someone would think time controls help weak players more than strong players.  Seems to me that the stronger one is, the easier it is to find good moves quickly.  Time controls are necessary in tournament games.  If you want to be competitive in tournaments, you've got to be able to play well within the time allowed.  That's why I think it's smart to use clocks in casual games as well.  Train the way you fight.  

  • #17

    Well that's one way to look at it and what if we talk about situation just casual , not in a chess clubs or tournaments

  • #18

    Like I said, tournaments have time controls so it's smart to use them in casual games, which are essentially practice for rated games.  However, I haven't played in a tournament in many years and I have no intention of playing in one now.  But I still prefer to play with the clock because it limits the duration of the game.  I don't want to invest five hours in a casual game because my opponent likes to take his time.

  • #19

    Playing chess without a clock doesn't seem like real chess. The standard will be lower because there's not much point in trying too hard.

  • #20
    Optimissed wrote:

    Playing chess without a clock doesn't seem like real chess. The standard will be lower because there's not much point in trying too hard.

    I agree. The clock is an important part of a serious chess game, whether it's rated or not. Playing without one is not much different from allowing mulligans in an informal round of golf. You're relaxing the rules because the game is not important. So why put much effort into it?

Top

Online Now