Forums

The "Knight-Club" - A study from 1936

ThePawnSlayer
A study from 1936. See if you are able to solve!
Video solution:
Good luck!!

Arisktotle

I'm afraid this is not an endgame study from 1936 - or from any other year - it is only the end of a study by Kubbel and Herbstmann. This presentation is as bad as cutting away half the Mona Lisa and claiming that the remainder is a famous painting by Leonardo Da Vice portraying the mysterious "half-smile-half".

Here is the original:

 

ThePawnSlayer
Arisktotle wrote:

I'm afraid this is not an endgame study from 1936 - or from any other year - it is only the end of a study by Kubbel and Herbstmann. This presentation is as bad as cutting away half the Mona Lisa and claiming that the remainder is a famous painting by Leonardo Da Vice portraying the mysterious "half-smile-half".

Here is the original:

 

 

 

Many thanks for sharing the original puzzle. It is shame that the book I had only covered the final two moves. It is very beautiful the solution and answers my question as to why the pawn had to promote to a knight. Thank you for sharing this happy.png

Arisktotle
ThePawnSlayer wrote:

It is shame that the book I had only covered the final two moves. It is very beautiful the solution and answers my question as to why the pawn had to promote to a knight. 

We know that social media is mostly BS but it's shame that the contagion appears to have spread to books. It's the one medium we used to rely on for proper research - at least for chess. Tiiiiiiimes, they are a changin ... (Bob Dyyyyyylanwink.png)

MyNameIsNotBuddy

It's not a forced stalemate, Ke3 is a blunder since there are still checkmate chances with two knights

Arisktotle
MyNameIsNotBuddy wrote:

It's not a forced stalemate, Ke3 is a blunder since there are still checkmate chances with two knights

It's a chess composition, not a game. In the parts of the solution which are not shown both sides presumably play the best moves and the outcome is certain - a draw in this instance. The parts of the solution shown contain the most spectacular and difficult moves and (sometimes) the errors that should be avoided. In endgame studies such as this one speed doesn't matter. A forced draw is not better or worse than a draw after 183 aimless moves. Blunders are only those moves that change the final outcome of the challenge to your disadvantage.

MyNameIsNotBuddy
Arisktotle wrote:
MyNameIsNotBuddy wrote:

It's not a forced stalemate, Ke3 is a blunder since there are still checkmate chances with two knights

It's a chess composition, not a game. In the parts of the solution which are not shown both sides presumably play the best moves and the outcome is certain - a draw in this instance. The parts of the solution shown contain the most spectacular and difficult moves and (sometimes) the errors that should be avoided. In endgame studies such as this one speed doesn't matter. A forced draw is not better or worse than a draw after 183 aimless moves. Blunders are only those moves that change the final outcome of the challenge to your disadvantage.

I was just saying Ke3 was a mistake because you can still mate with two knights. 

jetoba
MyNameIsNotBuddy wrote:
Arisktotle wrote:
MyNameIsNotBuddy wrote:

It's not a forced stalemate, Ke3 is a blunder since there are still checkmate chances with two knights

It's a chess composition, not a game. In the parts of the solution which are not shown both sides presumably play the best moves and the outcome is certain - a draw in this instance. The parts of the solution shown contain the most spectacular and difficult moves and (sometimes) the errors that should be avoided. In endgame studies such as this one speed doesn't matter. A forced draw is not better or worse than a draw after 183 aimless moves. Blunders are only those moves that change the final outcome of the challenge to your disadvantage.

I was just saying Ke3 was a mistake because you can still mate with two knights. 

The study was for how White can achieve a position that is drawn with best play.  Prior to the Knight sacrifice it was theoretically possible that Black might make a mistake and allow White to mate Black (as just one of many examples think of Black Ka1, Na2, Nb2, Nb1 and White Nc3) but White throwing away that chance was not a mistake by White because it reached either stalemate or a K+2N vs K position where Black can only win if White makes a major blunder.