Two corrected puzzles

Arisktotle
sameez1 wrote:

@n951l  here is the diagram. I deleted it first time could not edit it .

I don't know if it's true but they told me that diagram editing fails in the new (v3) chess.com interface but works in the old version (v2). I only work with v2.

Nice problem with a great use of the e.p. rule. The solution is not a Novotny (see my comment on the threemover) as the rook is pinned. I would describe it as "taking the slow boat to China".

sameez1

@ Arisktotle Yes I was experimenting with it to see if I could animate the solution.when I posted it it was an on going movie .I could not make it stop,so I deleted it. It took me awhile to understand what the FEN markings were.I am finding that I know very little about this game,fits right in with my limited use of the computer. I think i am getting addicted to the puzzles,there is a kind of beauty to the situations created that is there for you to find.

n9531l
sameez1 wrote:

@n951l  here is the diagram.

Here is the information (from yacpdb) about the source of this problem.

php4YMfXx.jpeg

sameez1

  @n9531l  Thanks I can post this under more puzzles now. Giving the authors name is enough  right.

 

Arisktotle
sameez1 wrote:

  @n9531l  Thanks I can post this under more puzzles now. Giving the authors name is enough  right. 

It is common practice to mention the author name as well as year and place (magazine) of publication such that the source can be easily located/verified. Prizes are optional but are a nice way to pay tribute to the composer.

However, if you don't know them, then you don't know them. Need not stop you from posting or publishing a problem. Just say: author unknown. If you place a problem as a puzzle to be solved, it is quite allright to omit its credentials until the puzzle solution is found or given. This especially applies to solving contests between experts where knowing the author or the year may be a giveaway for the pattern of a solution.

carlosrod1

Wonderful puzzle! I love the 2nd one. 

minnesotachesscoach

Somehow I solved both of them in under 20 seconds... but they are quite nice. The simplest way to solve these mate in two-type problems is to understand the following:

  • No checks or captures (usually)
  • An opponent's check threat almost always has a capture to refute it, so eliminate any movement patterns that allow a check to avoid capture
  • Identify flight squares for the king
  • Leave batteries alone and create them.
sameez1

liked these happy.png