Movie reviews

trysts
theoreticalboy wrote:


The latter, if you're defending the film on those grounds.  Though, you may be talking about self-absorption within the context of the film, whereas I refer to Lynch climbing steadily up his own back passage.

I have to say, Bugs Bunny was fantastically irritating.  That rabbit was one primo asshole.


Well, I'm not really doing anything this afternoon, so I might as well defend Bugs Bunny.

I know a sex-charged, creepy, wigged, trenchcoat-wearing mute with a horn, accounting for a third of the so-called "humour" of  Duck Soup, is not supposed to be "fantastically irritating", but I think he is. Chico's allegedly "funny" musical numbers, and his mispronunciation and misunderstanding of words(perhaps the easiest comedy to do, given that even infants do it, and are at least cute when it happens), is headache worthy. Then Groucho. If Alan Alda can become a success imitating him, and Bugs Bunny can transcend him, then I can safely say that Groucho has done more harm than good.Laughing

teocaf

Here's a short list of more "mainstream" movies that I find myself watching again and again for various reasons:

Bladerunner 

Glengarry Glen Ross

The Big Lebowsky

Amadeus

Wings of Desire

Chariots of Fire

theoreticalboy

What?  You feel the need to defend Bugs Bunny against charges of being fantastic?

jesterville

The Deer Hunter (1978), a great movie starring the young Robert De Nero and Meryl Streep. The film is about a group of Russian American steel workers, and their service in the Vietnam War. It was considered a "block buster" in those days...cost $15 million to produce, and grossed $49 million. Produced and Directed by Michael Cimino.

Schindler's List (1993), the true storey of Osker Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish/Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factory. Starring Lian Neeson and Ben Kingsley. Produced and Directed by Stephen Spielberg.

trysts
theoreticalboy wrote:

What?  You feel the need to defend Bugs Bunny against charges of being fantastic?


Oops! I misunderstoodLaughing

theoreticalboy
trysts wrote:
theoreticalboy wrote:

What?  You feel the need to defend Bugs Bunny against charges of being fantastic?


Oops! I misunderstood


Because you're living in a bizarro-world where "fantastic" is bad and Groucho Marx isn't funny?

trysts
teocaf wrote:

Here's a short list of more "mainstream" movies that I find myself watching again and again for various reasons:

Bladerunner 

Glengarry Glen Ross

The Big Lebowsky

Amadeus

Wings of Desire

Chariots of Fire


I didn't see "Wings of Desire"(1987), and I don't remember  "Chariots of Fire"(1981) at the moment, but the other four choices are very good, with my favorite being "Glengarry Glen Ross"(1992)! I've probably watched that film four times! Jack Lemmon was never better! Thanks.

Crazychessplaya
teocaf wrote:

Here's a short list of more "mainstream" movies that I find myself watching again and again for various reasons:

Glengarry Glen Ross


 Great movie indeed!

trysts
theoreticalboy wrote:
trysts wrote:
theoreticalboy wrote:

What?  You feel the need to defend Bugs Bunny against charges of being fantastic?


Oops! I misunderstood


Because you're living in a bizarro-world where "fantastic" is bad and Groucho Marx isn't funny?


Laughing

teocaf

for those fans of Glengarry and of writer David Mamet, you should also check out another great movie that he wrote: House of Games 

trysts
jesterville wrote:

The Deer Hunter (1978), a great movie starring the young Robert De Nero and Meryl Streep. The film is about a group of Russian American steel workers, and their service in the Vietnam War. It was considered a "block buster" in those days...cost $15 million to produce, and grossed $49 million. Produced and Directed by Michael Cimino.

Schindler's List (1993), the true storey of Osker Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish/Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factory. Starring Lian Neeson and Ben Kingsley. Produced and Directed by Stephen Spielberg.


The Deer Hunter was a great film. Surreal, without being dreamily surreal(gritty surrealism perhaps?). Pretty unforgettable experience for me. I could only watch it once, since it made such a vivid impact on me.

A have problems with Schindler's list. I recently watched it again and changed my opinion on it completely. In short, I don't like Spielberg. He seems to have made a film about the holocaust that I found to be disturbingly manipulative. It's such a serious subject, yet this film is really only a talent show for Spielberg. That made me uncomfortable.

corrijean

Isaac is a baseball fan, so we always kick off the season by watching For Love of the Game. It grows on you the more times you watch it.

MyCowsCanFly

"The Passion of the Christ" is the only movie I have intentionally not seen. I've heard it's based on a true story. 

A few people I've known said it changed their lives. They seem about the same to me.

MyCowsCanFly
LisaV wrote:

Last night I watched Memento (2000), starring Carrie-Anne Moss, aka Trinity, Joe Pantoliano, aka Cypher, and some guy I've forgotten.  ;)

This is one of those screenplays/novels/short stories (it's based on a short story) that makes me envious I didn't write, dammit. >:-(  Brilliantly conceived screenplay.  Damn.


That was amazing. I think I understood more each time I saw it but continued to puzzle and ponder.

theoreticalboy

Memento and The Usual Suspects are fun, but they're just writing tricks, right?  Nolan is one of the most literal directors around, actually.  The guy has no feel for the subtleties of cinematic language.

bigpoison
theoreticalboy wrote:

Memento and The Usual Suspects are fun, but they're just writing tricks, right?  Nolan is one of the most literal directors around, actually.  The guy has no feel for the subtleties of cinematic language.


The "literary trick" in The Usual Suspects isn't even a literary trick.  The director intentionally lies to the audience.  Kinda' like in that terrible movie Fight Club where they show outsiders interacting with both the Norton and Pitt characters.

theoreticalboy

I'm not talking about writing, I'm talking about directing.

theoreticalboy

....you want me to furnish detailed visual analysis of a movie I last saw six years ago?

theoreticalboy

Oh, it's just the way he films everything; it's constant shot/counter-shot/counter-counter-shot.  Actually, there was a great blog post on this apropos Inception.  Let's see if I can find it...

http://bigother.com/2010/08/08/seventeen-ways-of-criticizing-inception/

Yes, I can.

theoreticalboy

He's learned his craft entirely, he's just not very good at it.  The Dark Knight was awful, awful, awful, at least when Heath Ledger wasn't around.

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