Movie reviews

  • #161

    How about the cannibalistic film "Soylent Green"?

    Sorry but I am not hungry.

  • #162
    winerkleiner wrote:

    How about the cannibalistic film "Soylent Green"?

    Sorry but I am not hungry.


    I really liked that film! I wish they really had places like the one Edward G Robinson went to, to dieSmile

  • #163

    theoreticalboy wrote:

      I remembered the last film I actually watched was Kiki's Delivery Service, which is a Miyazaki effort no less stirring for being minor and generally adorable.

     hey, i saw that film recently as well. i recommend to anyone all of the Studio Ghibli films, especially 'Spirited Away' and 'Grave of the Fireflies', viewer discretion is advised for the latter since it contains some deep sadness.

  • #164

    ...the whole thing about bringing back films in colour, or 3-D, or HD...is clearly about squeezing every dime out of a movie, and where the film is already made...then re-finishing comes with minimal costs. Personally, I don't think the Film Industry really cares about the quality of the film...but the greatest priority is "sellability". Even when there is a great storey to tell Producers may not want to take the risk because of poor reviews etc...or when ratings start to dip they immediately pull the plug on great shows due to potential advertising revenue loss.

    Now, the fad is 3-D...so everyone is converting their films since "AVATAR" was the first to gross US$1billion in gross revenue...3-D Television demand is growing also...until the next "big thing" shows up.

    I personally have no problem with re-touching films, and giving them a modern look (as long as the original is still available).

  • #165

    trysts, I had this same idea about doing a "movie review" on these forums...but I must admit that you are doing a far better service than I could...Embarassed

  • #166
    jesterville wrote:

    trysts, I had this same idea about doing a "movie review" on these forums...but I must admit that you are doing a far better service than I could...


    I doubt that, but thank you!Laughing

  • #167
    totaLBeginner wrote:

    theoreticalboy wrote:

      I remembered the last film I actually watched was Kiki's Delivery Service, which is a Miyazaki effort no less stirring for being minor and generally adorable.

     hey, i saw that film recently as well. i recommend to anyone all of the Studio Ghibli films, especially 'Spirited Away' and 'Grave of the Fireflies', viewer discretion is advised for the latter since it contains some deep sadness.


    I liked "Spirited Away"(2001) when it first came out! Thanks for the other recommendations, totaLBeginnerSmile

  • #168
    totaLBeginner wrote:

    theoreticalboy wrote:

      I remembered the last film I actually watched was Kiki's Delivery Service, which is a Miyazaki effort no less stirring for being minor and generally adorable.

     hey, i saw that film recently as well. i recommend to anyone all of the Studio Ghibli films, especially 'Spirited Away' and 'Grave of the Fireflies', viewer discretion is advised for the latter since it contains some deep sadness.


    I actually couldn't stomach the sadness, thought it was too maudlin.  Though, perhaps I was just in a bad mood at the time.  Mononoke should certainly also be watched.

    But yeah, really, I wake up and we've got more trashing of the creators of the greatest war satire film (Duck Soup), and praise for the irrelevent, self-absorbed schlockyness of Eraserhead.  I didn't mind Lynch until I saw that film, which seems to exist solely to motivate Columbia College students that they can have a viable career putting whatever shit they feel like on screen, since that's clearly the level of production.  It's maybe the worst film mentioned here, worse even than American History X, which of course even the director knew was shit.

    One ought to watch the last few minutes of After the Fox.

  • #169
    trysts wrote:
    oinquarki wrote:

    Flowers for Algernon?


    Is that a movie? Did you like it, or not?


    Flowers for Algernon is a book about an autistic kid and a super mouse.  The mouse's name is Algernon.

    Somebody made a movie out of it.  It was called Charlie, I think.  I'm pretty sure that Charlie was the name of the protagonist.

  • #170

    If you like "The Usual Suspects" take a look at "Miller's Crossing" ... great flick by the Coen Brothers set in Prohibition Era New Orleans.

  • #171
    theoreticalboy wrote:

    But yeah, really, I wake up and we've got more trashing of the creators of the greatest war satire film (Duck Soup), and praise for the irrelevent, self-absorbed schlockyness of Eraserhead.


    Hmm...."...the greatest war satire"?! I recommend Bugs Bunny cartoons for you. You may find them powerful and provocative! In fact, you may want to consider the profound works of Porky Pig.Laughing

    And, by the way, the entire point of Eraserhead was exaggerated "self-absorption", in case you missed itWink

  • #172
    1pawndown wrote:

    If you like "The Usual Suspects" take a look at "Miller's Crossing" ... great flick by the Coen Brothers set in Prohibition Era New Orleans.


    I totally agree, "Miller's Crossing"(1990) is fantastic! Albert Finney, John Turturro, and Gabriel Byrne were simply superb! One of the best gangster films I have seenSmile

  • #173
    trysts wrote:

    The Usual Suspects(1995)

    Though entertaining, this film is very overrated. It plays very fast, and has a clean ending. But, it just is okay. And of course, Gabriel Byrne, Kevin Spacey, and Benicio del Toro have done much more interesting roles. Not a bad film.


    i don't think this is overrated.  the compelling concept in this film is that the story is a fabrication told by unreliable sources so that you never know what actually happened.  i also found benicio del toro's character to be as interesting as he's ever been.  very good film that should be watched more than once.

  • #174
    trysts wrote:
    theoreticalboy wrote:

    But yeah, really, I wake up and we've got more trashing of the creators of the greatest war satire film (Duck Soup), and praise for the irrelevent, self-absorbed schlockyness of Eraserhead.


    Hmm...."...the greatest war satire"?! I recommend Bugs Bunny cartoons for you. You may find them powerful and provocative! In fact, you may want to consider the profound works of Porky Pig.

    And, by the way, the entire point of Eraserhead was exaggerated "self-absorption", in case you missed it


    That's the worst point ever.  In fact, I don't think even woodshover could have come up with an argument as weak as that one Surprised

  • #175
    theoreticalboy wrote:
    trysts wrote:
    theoreticalboy wrote:

    But yeah, really, I wake up and we've got more trashing of the creators of the greatest war satire film (Duck Soup), and praise for the irrelevent, self-absorbed schlockyness of Eraserhead.


    Hmm...."...the greatest war satire"?! I recommend Bugs Bunny cartoons for you. You may find them powerful and provocative! In fact, you may want to consider the profound works of Porky Pig.

    And, by the way, the entire point of Eraserhead was exaggerated "self-absorption", in case you missed it


    That's the worst point ever.  In fact, I don't think even woodshover could have come up with an argument as weak as that one


    Any woodshover comparisons, I find to be a great compliment! Thanks!Wink Now which "point"? That "Duck Soup" is not only very similar to Bugs Bunny cartoons, but the cartoons are even better than anything in that movie? Or, that "Eraserhead" is a film about self absorption to the point of being disturbing?

  • #176

    ...I always loved the old black and white films by Harold Lloyd...silent and very comical...I could watch his stuff for hours...no voices, "no colour", simple storey lines...but captivating. I guess the appeal was based on the simple everyday activities of the ordinary man, through the eyes of the clown...slap stick yes, and very funny.

  • #177
    jesterville wrote:

    ...I always loved the old black and white films by Harold Lloyd...silent and very comical...I could watch his stuff for hours...no voices, "no colour", simple storey lines...but captivating. I guess the appeal was based on the simple everyday activities of the ordinary man, through the eyes of the clown...slap stick yes, and very funny.


    I've only watched "The Freshman"(1925). Very amusing.

  • #178
    trysts wrote:
    theoreticalboy wrote:
    trysts wrote:
    theoreticalboy wrote:

    But yeah, really, I wake up and we've got more trashing of the creators of the greatest war satire film (Duck Soup), and praise for the irrelevent, self-absorbed schlockyness of Eraserhead.


    Hmm...."...the greatest war satire"?! I recommend Bugs Bunny cartoons for you. You may find them powerful and provocative! In fact, you may want to consider the profound works of Porky Pig.

    And, by the way, the entire point of Eraserhead was exaggerated "self-absorption", in case you missed it


    That's the worst point ever.  In fact, I don't think even woodshover could have come up with an argument as weak as that one


    Any woodshover comparisons, I find to be a great compliment! Thanks! Now which "point"? That "Duck Soup" is not only very similar to Bugs Bunny cartoons, but the cartoons are even better than anything in that movie? Or, that "Eraserhead" is a film about self absorption to the point of being disturbing?


    The latter, if you're defending the film on those grounds.  Though, you may be talking about self-absorption within the context of the film, whereas I refer to Lynch climbing steadily up his own back passage.

    I have to say, Bugs Bunny was fantastically irritating.  That rabbit was one primo asshole.

  • #179

    living in large cities, i was glad to always find repertory cinema as well as really good movie rental stores.  in my small town now, i am hard pressed to find any of that. recently i found a great source for films.  it's a series called Film Movement where they take international award winning independent feature films and shorts and release them once a month.  my local library carries it--they show the movie during movie night and then put the dvd on the shelf for checkout.  i think that individuals that collect films and want to support independent film can subscribe to the series.  all the movies that i've seen so far have been terrific. 

  • #180

    Film Movement is pretty cool, though the self-congratulatory opening sequence is fairly grating.  The Bothersome Man, Viva l'algerie and Ali Zaoua, prince de la rue, are all fantastic.

This forum topic has been locked

Online Now