Accumulation of Advantages -by Wilhelm Steinitz

ChessReina

Principle of Concept of general logical value introduced in the strategy chess by Steinitz, according to which the progressive accumulation of small advantages, like isolating an enemy peon, to take a peon own to the center of the board, to place a piece in a dominant point is translated, In the long run, in an advantage of greater intitity, giving rise generally to chains of combination or winning lines.

yureesystem

Every player who has aspiration to becoming a CM or FM should study Steinitz and Chigorin games, reason is one is scientific and the other is dynamic and you will learn how to play chess properly. Chigorin interesting Old Indian defense or his Chigorin defense, he use a lot hyper-modern ideas. Steinitz is one the first to understand pawn chains, his Steinitz variation in Ruy Lopez 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 Bb5 d6 is deep and sound idea and safe-guarding his e5 pawn. His match against Zukertort, Steinitz was a able to defend against unsound attack and create a isolated queen pawn and exploited it and win it because the weakness.

Alekhine-Love
 
 
 
nullyureesystem wrote:

Every player who has aspiration to becoming a CM or FM should study Steinitz and Chigorin games, reason is one is scientific and the other is dynamic and you will learn how to play chess properly. Chigorin interesting Old Indian defense or his Chigorin defense, he use a lot hyper-modern ideas. Steinitz is one the first to understand pawn chains, his Steinitz variation in Ruy Lopez 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 Bb5 d6 is deep and sound idea and safe-guarding his e5 pawn. His match against Zukertort, Steinitz was a able to defend against unsound attack and create a isolated queen pawn and exploited it and win it because the weakness.

 

Alekhine-Love

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Ahptoemiz

Accumulation of Advantages lives on... In Silman.

I suspect Silman's famous HTRYC of being Steinitz's accumulation theory repacked (only Silman calls them "imbalances" instead of "advantages") 

If that's the case, Silman then sadly fails to give Steinitz proper credit.