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Chess for Young Kids ( age 4-6)

  • #41
    TatsumakiRonyk wrote:

    Jean, thank you for sharing. I didn't see this thread back in September when you first wrote about it. I'm rooting for Jean Jr.  Keep us updated on his progress!

    Thank you for you kind words and support....I will try and update as things progress yes. Yesterday he played against his mother, and lost. He was quite upset and almost emotional....so now I need to try and teach him that chess is not about winning and losing, but about learning and growing while I am trying to work on the checkmate concept with him hahahaha, seems impossible but I am trying my best. Thankful for all the input in this thread.

  • #42

    ooooooooooooooooooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh - my whole life long I was a nerd and people all people even nerds don't get along and don't like nerds - like think animal - kid needs to survive learn to interact with kids play teaches him to wheel and deal and negotiate - parents are role models and should know monkey see monkey do - - - he copies you - teach him to grow up in this world and how to later get what he wants legally - - or you can teach the 4 yr old chess and raise a creepy nerd - - - 

  • #43

    Thanks for the update, and congrats on the good results.

     

    One way I helped my kid play slower is to give him a reward if he finishes the game using at least 15 minutes on his clock.  Each extra minute (after the 15) = 1 minute of free screen time.  Now, he doesn't need this incentive any more (and I've removed it) since his games last longer.

     

  • #44
    mgx9600 wrote:

    Thanks for the update, and congrats on the good results.

     

    One way I helped my kid play slower is to give him a reward if he finishes the game using at least 15 minutes on his clock.  Each extra minute (after the 15) = 1 minute of free screen time.  Now, he doesn't need this incentive any more (and I've removed it) since his games last longer.

     

    I have the same problem with some of the older kids that play chess at our school. They all move way to fast, but I will see if there is a way I can reward them for playing longer, thanks for this tip.

  • #45
    PastotJLM wrote:
    mgx9600 wrote:

    Thanks for the update, and congrats on the good results.

     

    One way I helped my kid play slower is to give him a reward if he finishes the game using at least 15 minutes on his clock.  Each extra minute (after the 15) = 1 minute of free screen time.  Now, he doesn't need this incentive any more (and I've removed it) since his games last longer.

     

    I have the same problem with some of the older kids that play chess at our school. They all move way to fast, but I will see if there is a way I can reward them for playing longer, thanks for this tip.

    There are two possible factors why they move fast. One is  if they don't know what to do as they don't have much knowledge yet and number 2 is lack of patience. For lack of patience reward might work and solving tactics problems appropriate for their level. For lack of knowledge, solving easy puzzles will add knowledge to them that they will consider more things. One thing  you can also do is to give a reward to whoever will find first the solution to the tactics. Mix up with mate problems with tactics that win material.

     

    Tell them also to:

     

    Always study your opponent's last move

    Look at the whole board

    Before they make a move, check if there is a tactical drawback.

  • #46

    A game I played with my 4 year old son today. I was reading "The Amateur's Mind by Silman" when he came and asked me if he could play a game of chess with me.

     

    If you look at some of his previous games, I think progress is taking place.

  • #47

    Definitely there is a progress. You can also tell him that instead of qd3, he can play d3 to open up the bishop. Tell him in the opening, you need to develop/bringout all your pieces. Does he know that queen is the strongest piece?

  • #48
    jambyvedar wrote:

    Definitely there is a progress. You can also tell him that instead of qd3, he can play d3 to open up the bishop. Tell him in the opening, you need to develop/bringout all your pieces. Does he know that queen is the strongest piece?

    Yes, he is aware of those things you mention... I explain developing to him as "his pieces are sleeping on the back rank".... I did not want to "teach" him during this game as I wanted to get an idea of how he progressed. 

     

    There's still work to do, but I am very pleased with the progress so far, just don't know what he was thinking about moving his queen around like that, but hey, small steps at a time.

  • #49
    PastotJLM wrote:
    jambyvedar wrote:

    Definitely there is a progress. You can also tell him that instead of qd3, he can play d3 to open up the bishop. Tell him in the opening, you need to develop/bringout all your pieces. Does he know that queen is the strongest piece?

    Yes, he is aware of those things you mention... I explain developing to him as "his pieces are sleeping on the back rank".... I did not want to "teach" him during this game as I wanted to get an idea of how he progressed. 

     

    There's still work to do, but I am very pleased with the progress so far, just don't know what he was thinking about moving his queen around like that, but hey, small steps at a time.

     

    usually beginners like to move around their queen(with no good reason). but in due time such habit will lessen. what did your son say when you checkmated him? yeah, it is  a good thing at giving pointers after the game.

  • #50
    jambyvedar wrote:
    PastotJLM wrote:
    jambyvedar wrote:

    Definitely there is a progress. You can also tell him that instead of qd3, he can play d3 to open up the bishop. Tell him in the opening, you need to develop/bringout all your pieces. Does he know that queen is the strongest piece?

    Yes, he is aware of those things you mention... I explain developing to him as "his pieces are sleeping on the back rank".... I did not want to "teach" him during this game as I wanted to get an idea of how he progressed. 

     

    There's still work to do, but I am very pleased with the progress so far, just don't know what he was thinking about moving his queen around like that, but hey, small steps at a time.

     

    usually beginners like to move around their queen(with no good reason). but in due time such habit will lessen. what did your son say when you checkmated him? yeah, it is  a good thing at giving pointers after the game.

    He used to get upset when i checkmate him, but lately it is more a sense of disappointment of losing than the emotion of anger. He still gets a bit angry when his mom beats him at times, but mostly his attitude has improved. 

     

    After losing this game, we shook hands, and he gave a cheeky little smile afterwards. 

     

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